Author Topic: EM-1 Orion Service Module updates  (Read 113468 times)

Offline hektor

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Offline Nibb31

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #81 on: 12/04/2015 03:26 pm »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Orion

It looks like they didn't get the memo about the shiny coating on the capsule.

Offline jtrame

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #82 on: 12/04/2015 03:30 pm »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Orion

It looks like they didn't get the memo about the shiny coating on the capsule.

I wonder if the forward looking cockpit windows will retain the black covering in the recessed areas to prevent glare.  Latest NASA image shows them shiny like the rest of the spacecraft, but that could be artists license.

Offline bolun

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Offline Oli

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #84 on: 12/05/2015 04:18 pm »
You make the mistake of assuming that SpaceX would, under equal requirements, come up with the same behemoth vehicle that NASA forced onto LockMart.

I don't get it. So you think NASA forced the "behemoth" on Lockheed but would not force it on SpaceX? What's your argument again?

The lunar Dragon from the Evolvable Lunar Architecture by the way is almost as heavy as Orion, all things included, and can only keep a crew of 4 alive for 14 days (not that I trust the study, but its the only one I know of).

Two major flaws with your argument:

- Orion and Lunar Dragon cannot be compared as apples-to-apples: Orion does not carry it's LAS all the way to lunar orbit. That add's quite a bit of mass to Dragon.
- No actual input for the Evolvable Lunar Architecture actually came from SpaceX, so all mass figures for the Lunar Dragon, including those of the required modifications are to be taken with quite a bit of salt.

- Dragon's LAS engines and fuel are used for LLO insertion/departure.
- I agree, the cost projections are silly and they assume 324s of ISP for the SuperDracos, so I don't trust the study at all. Too "optimistic".

« Last Edit: 12/05/2015 04:18 pm by Oli »

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #85 on: 12/07/2015 06:33 am »
Two major flaws with your argument:

- Orion and Lunar Dragon cannot be compared as apples-to-apples: Orion does not carry it's LAS all the way to lunar orbit. That add's quite a bit of mass to Dragon.
- No actual input for the Evolvable Lunar Architecture actually came from SpaceX, so all mass figures for the Lunar Dragon, including those of the required modifications are to be taken with quite a bit of salt.

- Dragon's LAS engines and fuel are used for LLO insertion/departure.
- I agree, the cost projections are silly and they assume 324s of ISP for the SuperDracos, so I don't trust the study at all. Too "optimistic".


Have you even bothered to read that study properly?
- If you had you would have noticed that LLO insertion is not done by Dragon's LAS engines but by the still-attached Falcon 9 second stage.
- LLO departure (aka Trans Earth Injection) is done by Dragon's LAS engines using propellants being drawn from a second attached trunk.
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing. So my point, that Dragon carries it's LAS systems (including the needed propellants) all the way to the moon and back to Earth again, stands. It also means that comparing lunar Orion and lunar Dragon on weight alone is not apples-to-apples.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2015 11:10 am by woods170 »

Offline Oli

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #86 on: 12/07/2015 12:39 pm »
Two major flaws with your argument:

- Orion and Lunar Dragon cannot be compared as apples-to-apples: Orion does not carry it's LAS all the way to lunar orbit. That add's quite a bit of mass to Dragon.
- No actual input for the Evolvable Lunar Architecture actually came from SpaceX, so all mass figures for the Lunar Dragon, including those of the required modifications are to be taken with quite a bit of salt.

- Dragon's LAS engines and fuel are used for LLO insertion/departure.
- I agree, the cost projections are silly and they assume 324s of ISP for the SuperDracos, so I don't trust the study at all. Too "optimistic".


Have you even bothered to read that study properly?
- If you had you would have noticed that LLO insertion is not done by Dragon's LAS engines but by the still-attached Falcon 9 second stage.
- LLO departure (aka Trans Earth Injection) is done by Dragon's LAS engines using propellants being drawn from a second attached trunk.
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing. So my point, that Dragon carries it's LAS systems (including the needed propellants) all the way to the moon and back to Earth again, stands. It also means that comparing lunar Orion and lunar Dragon on weight alone is not apples-to-apples.

Fair enough, sustract ~1.4t of fuel for landing and an additional ~0.5t from the trunk. Doesn't change the big picture. You have a less capable vehicle weighting ~3t less than Orion.

I'm still waiting for a technical argument why a lunar Dragon/CST-100 should be less heavy given equal requirements.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2015 12:53 pm by Oli »

Online Lars-J

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #87 on: 12/07/2015 06:29 pm »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #88 on: 12/07/2015 09:11 pm »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.
No. In the quoted study it is assumed that the propellant in the service module is reserved for LAS and Earth landing duties.
It does not matter if this not actually the case. What matters is what assumptions are made in the study.

Online Lars-J

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #89 on: 12/08/2015 04:28 am »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.
No. In the quoted study it is assumed that the propellant in the service module is reserved for LAS and Earth landing duties.
It does not matter if this not actually the case. What matters is what assumptions are made in the study.

Then the assumptions are wrong, and the study is questionable. How can propellant be reserved for LAS duties when the launch has already happened?

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #90 on: 12/09/2015 09:18 am »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.
No. In the quoted study it is assumed that the propellant in the service module is reserved for LAS and Earth landing duties.
It does not matter if this not actually the case. What matters is what assumptions are made in the study.

Then the assumptions are wrong, and the study is questionable. How can propellant be reserved for LAS duties when the launch has already happened?
Reserved for LAS duties during launch. The added trunk is left behind when a launch escape is required. The added trunk also is not there when a propulsive landing is performed. That's what was meant with the propellants in the Dragon service section being reserved (as in: set aside) for LAS or propulsive landing duties.
Only propellants from the added trunk are used for the TEI burn.

Offline Oli

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #91 on: 12/09/2015 01:04 pm »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.
No. In the quoted study it is assumed that the propellant in the service module is reserved for LAS and Earth landing duties.
It does not matter if this not actually the case. What matters is what assumptions are made in the study.

Then the assumptions are wrong, and the study is questionable. How can propellant be reserved for LAS duties when the launch has already happened?

Launch escape requires ~300m/s. Landing 200m/s according to the study and deorbiting probably ~100m/s. It does add up.

Online Lars-J

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #92 on: 12/09/2015 04:46 pm »
- The propellants stored in the Dragon service module (Dragon's own, internal propellant supply) is exclusively reserved for LAS duties and Earth propulsive landing.

This is incorrect. Once launch is successful, what would have been used for LAS (all of it) is split up between mission propulsion needs (orbit/trajectory adjustment and attitude) and propulsive landing. There is no separate propellant supply for the Draco thrusters.
No. In the quoted study it is assumed that the propellant in the service module is reserved for LAS and Earth landing duties.
It does not matter if this not actually the case. What matters is what assumptions are made in the study.

Then the assumptions are wrong, and the study is questionable. How can propellant be reserved for LAS duties when the launch has already happened?

Launch escape requires ~300m/s. Landing 200m/s according to the study and deorbiting probably ~100m/s. It does add up.

Yes, *I* know it adds up. The Dragon 2 propellant is either used for LAS *OR* in-space/deorbit + landing. I'm merely correcting the impression that once in space, a portion of the propellant remains set aside for LAS, which is not true.

Offline bolun

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Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #94 on: 01/21/2016 11:16 pm »
Orion European Service Module Flight Model-1 logo
Posted on 21 Jan 2016 by julien   

The first mission with ESA's service module is Exploration Mission-1. This logo shows the Orion spacecraft exploring our Solar System, with the rear view highlighting the service module. The logo includes stylised depictions of Earth, the Moon and Mars – some of Orion’s destinations.

The border includes the abbreviation ESM for European Service Module. Between the distinctive solar wings on the right are the characters “fm-1”, denoting the first Flight Model of the maiden mission.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/01/21/orion-european-service-module-flight-model-1-logo/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #95 on: 01/22/2016 08:28 am »
The patch

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #96 on: 01/26/2016 07:09 pm »
Inside a rocket’s belly
 

An unusual view of a spacecraft – looking from below, directly into the thruster nozzles. This is a test version of ESA’s service module for NASA’s Orion spacecraft that will send astronauts further into space than ever before.
 
The European Service Module provides electricity, water, oxygen and nitrogen, and thermal control as well as propelling the spacecraft.
 
The large cone is the spacecraft’s main engine, the same model that was used on the Space Shuttle for orbital manoeuvres. The surrounding red cones are auxiliary thrusters. The engines will provide almost 30 kN of thrust, only one-tenth that of a Jumbo Jet engine, but enough to manoeuvre in space. More thrusters are carried on the module’s sides.
 
This structural test model is used for testing purposes before installing the real thing. It is as close to the flight version as possible while keeping costs and development time manageable. The structure and weight are the same, while mass equivalents stand in for electronics boxes not needed for the series of tests.
 
The model was installed under a test version of the Crew Module Adapter, and sits on the Spacecraft Adapter that will attach Orion to its launch vehicle. This is the first time the European hardware has been physically connected to NASA’s elements.
 
The service module will be shaken at NASA’s Plum Brook station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA, to recreate the vibrations of launch, as well as being subjected to acoustic and shock environments.

Online b0objunior

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #97 on: 01/31/2016 11:19 pm »
Hello,
Just to show a couple images from : https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion/

I don't think they've been posted here sooooooo here we go.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #98 on: 02/18/2016 03:58 pm »
Propulsion Module arrives in Stockholm
Posted on 18 Feb 2016

Another important part of the service module for the Orion spacecraft is getting ready for testing. The Propulsion Qualification Module will ensure that Orion’s thrusters and fuel system work, used to orient the spacecraft and send it back to Earth.

OHB Sweden and Airbus DS will do the final integration of this part of the spacecraft test module in Stockholm, Sweden. The pictures show the distinctive fuel tanks that will hold mixed oxides of nitrogen (MON) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) – two tanks for each propellant. The tanks were built in Bremen and delivered to Sweden to be put in the Propulsion Qualification Module.

The qualification module will be shipped to NASA's White Sands test facility in the USA this summer with the engines being fired up for firsts in September.

Meanwhile in Switzerland RUAG, delivered the Solar Array Drive Electronics unit is now available for testing. The qualification model Solar Array is also complete, built by Airbus DS in The Netherlands.

ESA’s Service Module is a true collaboration involving companies from all over Europe with Airbus DS as main contractor.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/02/18/propulsion-module-arrives-in-stockholm/

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #99 on: 02/26/2016 06:43 pm »
Orion Test Hardware in Position for Solar Array Test
Last Updated February 25, 2016 - Kelly Heidman

Engineers and technicians at NASA Glenn's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, are preparing for the first major test in the campaign to verify the structural integrity of Orion’s service module for Exploration Mission-1, the spacecraft’s first flight atop the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. Orion’s service module, which will power and propel the vehicle and supply it with air and water, is being provided by ESA and built by Airbus Defence and Space. The solar array wing deployment test will verify that the qualification model wing unfurls as expected. On Saturday, Feb. 20, an international team of engineers and technicians lifted and tilted the service module test article -- which includes structural representations of the service module, crew module adapter, and spacecraft adapter -- to a 90 degree angle to position it for the deployment test of one of Orion’s four solar arrays. The next step in preparation for the test is attaching the solar array before the Feb. 29 deployment test. This is the first in a series of crucial tests to verify the service module’s structural integrity and ability to withstand the dynamic launch environment atop the SLS rocket.

http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/orion-test-hardware-in-position-for-solar-array-test

Image credit: NASA, Christopher J. Lynch (Alcyon Technical Services)

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