Author Topic: EM-1 Orion Service Module updates  (Read 113493 times)

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #100 on: 02/27/2016 12:02 pm »
FINALLY! A decent shot of the ESM all buttoned-up. About time.

More at https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion/
« Last Edit: 02/28/2016 09:26 am by woods170 »

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #101 on: 02/27/2016 01:09 pm »
FINALLY! A decent shot of the ESM all buttoned-up. About time.

View from the forward end.

Offline SgtPoivre

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« Last Edit: 03/01/2016 07:11 am by SgtPoivre »

Offline redliox

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #103 on: 03/01/2016 08:18 am »
So far so good - at least the solar arrays from ESA work fine.  If life support and thrusters can do as well the Orion will be nearly ready to fly.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
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Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #104 on: 03/01/2016 08:48 am »
So far so good - at least the solar arrays from ESA work fine.  If life support and thrusters can do as well the Orion will be nearly ready to fly.
Not even close. Remember, what you are seeing here are the structural test articles of the ESM and the solar arrays. They will be in all kinds of test for the next year. By that time the actual flight hardware will have arrived in the USA for yet another round of testing, lasting nearly 10 months. NASA and ESA will be lucky if the complete Orion (CM + CMA + ESM) are ready for EM-1 in late 2018. But right now the planning is cutting it extremely tight.

Images below courtesy of Airbus Defense and Space
« Last Edit: 03/01/2016 09:00 am by woods170 »

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #105 on: 03/01/2016 03:25 pm »
Testing solar array
1 Mar 2016 - julien

On 29 February a test model of Orion’s solar array was unfolded at NASA’s Plum Brook Station test facility in Sandusky, Ohio to check everything works as expected. The solar panels were made by Airbus Defence and Space in the Netherlands for the ESA module that will supply power and life support for up to four astronauts.

Each wing stretches more than 7 m, folded inside the Space Launch Systems rocket that will launch the spacecraft on its first unmanned mission in 2018. Orion sports four wings of three panels with 1242 cells per panel to provide 11.1 kW of power – enough to run two typical European households. The distinctive X-wings are an evolution and improvement of ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle.

The test was passed with flying colours as the 260 kg array unfurled into its flight configuration. The stresses of flying to the Moon and beyond – and back again – mean the array is designed to bend up to 60º forward and backward, much like a bird in flight.

“That broad movement meant we had to design the wing with thickened solar panels and reinforced hinges and beams, which required extensive testing,” says Arnaud de Jong, head of the Airbus Defence and Space Solar Array team in Leiden, the Netherlands.  The wing tips are expected to deflect more than a metre. A camera on each wing tip, looking back at the spacecraft, will closely monitor the movement.

Further tests will look at how the solar array handles acoustic shocks, vibrations and other shock tests in the following months.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/03/01/testing-solar-array/

Online okan170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #106 on: 03/01/2016 04:47 pm »
“That broad movement meant we had to design the wing with thickened solar panels and reinforced hinges and beams, which required extensive testing,” says Arnaud de Jong, head of the Airbus Defence and Space Solar Array team in Leiden, the Netherlands.  The wing tips are expected to deflect more than a metre. A camera on each wing tip, looking back at the spacecraft, will closely monitor the movement.
...
http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/03/01/testing-solar-array/

I had read about this in an NTRS article last year and hoped that this would make it into the final vehicle... should be some really unique photos from those cameras!

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #107 on: 03/02/2016 12:51 pm »
On 29 February a test model of Orion’s solar array was unfolded at NASA’s Plum Brook Station test facility in Sandusky, Ohio to check everything works as expected. The solar panels were made by Airbus Defence and Space in the Netherlands for the ESA module that will supply power and life support for up to four astronauts.
 
Each wing stretches more than 7 m, folded inside the Space Launch Systems rocket that will launch the spacecraft on its first unmanned mission in 2018. Orion sports four wings of three panels with 1242 cells per panel to provide 11.1 kW of power – enough to run two typical European households. The distinctive X-wings are an evolution and improvement of ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle.
 
The test was passed with flying colours as the 260 kg array unfurled into its flight configuration. The stresses of flying to the Moon and beyond – and back again – mean the array is designed to bend up to 60º forward and backward, much like a bird in flight.
 
“That broad movement meant we had to design the wing with thickened solar panels and reinforced hinges and beams, which required extensive testing,” says Arnaud de Jong, head of the Airbus Defence and Space Solar Array team in Leiden, the Netherlands.
 
The wing tips are expected to deflect more than a metre. A camera on each wing tip, looking back at the spacecraft, will closely monitor the movement.
 
Further tests will look at how the solar array handles acoustic shocks, vibrations and other shock tests in the following months.

Offline SgtPoivre

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« Last Edit: 04/11/2016 05:58 pm by SgtPoivre »

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #109 on: 04/12/2016 08:21 am »
Original image added via the .orig extension.

This shows the integrated Orion service module stack, consisting of the Spacraft Adapter (SA), European Service Module (ESM), Crew Module Adapter (CMA) and the Spacecraft Adapter Jettisoned Panels (SAJP), being lowered onto the Orion Spacecraft Adapter inside the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility.

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #110 on: 04/26/2016 12:00 pm »
Orion [SM] update March-April
Posted on 26 Apr 2016 by julien

In February we reported on Orion spacecraft’s propulsion test qualification model main elements arriving in Sweden for assembling – time for an update. Although the Propulsion Qualification Module (PQM) will not go to space the model serves an important role in development: ensuring everything works as planned.

The model has four stainless-steel tanks 2000 litres each with walls 1 cm thick. The tanks will hold the propellants at a pressure of 25 bar with a total capacity of nine tonnes . Other elemenst of the PQM  include two high-pressure helium tanks; pressure-control systems; the sensing and command system with drive electronics; the propellant lines with shut-off valves; filters; and of course engines that will propel and orient Orion.

The engines that are part of the propulsion system include a US Space Shuttle engine as main engine, eight auxiliary thrusters and 12 smaller thrusters for the Reaction Control System, made by Airbus DS in  Lampoldshausen (Germany).

The integration of these parts for testing is taking place in Sweden with delivery planned for July/August 2016. The model will be tested in end 2016 or early 2017 including  firing the engines at White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico, USA.

Meanwhile the Solar Array Wing will start its acoustic testing to recreate the intense sounds and vibrations of launch in Plum Brook, USA, in April. The Exploration Mission-1 flight structure ­– the actual chassis that will be launched into space in 2018 – is scheduled to arrive end of April in Bremen, Germany as well.

From April 11 to June 16 an important Critical Design Review is happening a moment when any concerns about the spacecraft’s design are reviewed before fixing the design once and for all. A cutoff point in all spacecraft design, from this moment no more changes can easily be made…

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/04/26/orion-update-march-april/

Photo Captions:

Top: PQM Integration Readiness Review 1 (IRR1) at OHB Sweden, held on 22nd of March.

Bottom: Propulsion Qualification Model (PQM), currently including the structure and the propellant tanks, ready for the start of integration activities at OHB Sweden.

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #111 on: 04/26/2016 12:03 pm »
First flight module arrives in Bremen
Posted on 26 Apr 2016 by julien

The first flight module of the Orion European Service Module was delivered by Thales Alenia Space to the Airbus DS site in Bremen, Germany on 25 April 2016.

The Service Module will for now rest in Building 43 where first integration steps will take place. Later on it will be transported to the cleanroom in building 41, for integration and test in the clean environment.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/04/26/first-flight-module-arrives-in-bremen/

Offline SgtPoivre

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #112 on: 05/01/2016 08:44 pm »
Short NASA video somewhat related to the on-going Orion SM acoustic tests.


Sent from my SM-T810 using Tapatalk


Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #113 on: 05/07/2016 12:48 am »
The Exploration Mission-1 Service Module primary structure arrives at the Airbus Defence and Space facility in Bremen, Germany.  Photo taken 25 April 2016

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion/26634564681

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #114 on: 05/12/2016 01:13 am »
Call for Media: Integration of Orion’s European Service Module

Contracted by ESA, Airbus Defence and Space is building the European Service Module for NASA’s Orion spacecraft. Integration of the module’s flight model for
Orion’s first deep-space  mission has begun at the company’s Bremen site, Germany, where media representatives are invited to attend a press briefing on 19 May.


ESA and Airbus are playing a major role in the next step in human spaceflight by developing the European Service Module for Orion, NASA’s next-generation exploration
spacecraft that will send astronauts on missions beyond the Moon. 

The module sits below the crew capsule, and provides propulsion, power, thermal control, water and air.

The first full Orion mission, Exploration Mission-1, will be an uncrewed flight more than 64 000 km beyond the Moon in 2018 to demonstrate the vehicle’s performance
before a crewed flight. 

Based on decisions from the ESA Ministerial Council meeting in November 2012, the European industrial team led by Airbus Defence and Space is developing and
building the European Service Module for Exploration Mission-1, drawing on extensive experience gained from building the five Automated Transfer Vehicle supply
ferries for the International Space Station.

Provisional programme

Hall 43, Airbus Defence and Space, Bremen, Germany

10:30 Doors open and welcome
11:00 Start of the event. On podium:
– Jan Wöerner, ESA Director General 
– Jim Free, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Technical, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate 
– Philippe Deloo, ESA head of Orion ESM programme
– Tbd, DLR 
– Bart Reijnen, Airbus DS Head of On-Orbit-Services and Exploration 
– Walter Cugno, Thales Alenia Space, Vice President Exploration and Science
– Michael Hawes, Lockheed Martin: Vice President & Orion Program Manager 
11:50 Q&A
12:15 Individual interviews
12:45 Refreshments
13:30 End of event, more photo opportunities, ‘tour’ of the flight model

How to apply 

Media with valid press credentials should contact Airbus by 16 May 2016 at: [email protected]

IMPORTANT: security regulations mean that a valid identity card / passport is required to enter the premises. Press cards are not recognised for access to the
premises. 

For further information, please contact:

ESA Media Relations Office
Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99
Email: [email protected]

Airbus Defence and Space Media Relations Office
Tel: +49 89 607 33971
Email: [email protected]

Offline donaldp

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #115 on: 05/20/2016 09:26 pm »
The BBC have published a short article with an update of the service module progress.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36343542

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #116 on: 05/21/2016 09:26 am »
What are those dark rectangular structures placed between the solar cells?


Offline Jim

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #117 on: 05/21/2016 01:51 pm »
What are those dark rectangular structures placed between the solar cells?

Its likely where the array is held together for launch

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #118 on: 05/21/2016 08:31 pm »
What are those dark rectangular structures placed between the solar cells?

Its likely where the array is held together for launch
Correct. In the stowed configuration each array is supported by four posts sticking out of the ESM outher shell. A wire runs from each wire-end on the outermost panel of an array, through the holes in the center and inner panels into the support post. This is how the panels are held in their stowed configuration.
The support post contains a thermal knife that cuts the wire and releases the array. Springs in the array hinges do the actual work to deploy the arrays.
So, each array is secured for launch by four wires. It thus requires four thermal knifes to function perfectly for a single array to deploy, 16 thermal knifes for the full set of four solar arrays. Naturally, the thermal knifes are fully redundant. Each knife consists of actually two independantly powered thermal cutters. If one fails, the other will still be able to cut the wire.
On the flight arrays most of the black rectangular structures will actually be covered with photovoltaic cells. The single array shown on the images and footage of the deployment test is a structural model and holds only a handful of instrumented actual photovoltaic cells.
With regards to stowage and deployment these arrays for ESM are identical to the ones on ATV. They are better known as flatpack arrays and have been used on a good number of ESA and commercial satellites. With regards to the basic design the ESM solar arrays are largely standard.
« Last Edit: 05/22/2016 03:25 pm by woods170 »

Offline hektor

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #119 on: 05/23/2016 03:18 pm »
I disagree. Arrays which can be canted during engine boosts are pretty non standard (see Orion EM-1 youtube video).
« Last Edit: 05/23/2016 03:18 pm by hektor »

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