Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : SES-10 with reuse of CRS-8 Booster SN/1021 : 2017-03-30 : DISCUSSION  (Read 390656 times)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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SES: Based on SpaceX’s return-to-flight plans, we expect SES-10 to launch on reused Falcon 9 in January. Payload for next Falcon 9 still TBD

https://twitter.com/stephenclark1/status/791914581065019392

Edit: report of same SES remarks by Peter B. de Selding

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SES(6): CFO says SES-10 tentatively set for January launch on SpaceX Falcon 9. (This mission will inaugurate reuse of Falcon 9 1st stage.)

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/791915233677758465
« Last Edit: 10/28/2016 09:24 AM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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This weekend our #SES10 #satellite was shipped from @AirbusDS facilities in Toulouse to Cape Canaveral for its forthcoming launch w. @SpaceX

Twitter.com/SES_Satellites
And this is a good reminder that just because one of your fellow space enthusiasts occasionally voices doubts about the SpaceX schedule announcements or is cautious about believing SpaceX has licked a problem before actually seeing proof that's true, it doesn't mean they hate SpaceX.

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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So, SES are willing to fly on an unmodified F9 v.1.2 with just the altered prop and He load procedure?
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Offline kevinof

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Yep, and their Insurers.


So, SES are willing to fly on an unmodified F9 v.1.2 with just the altered prop and He load procedure?

Offline gongora

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So, SES are willing to fly on an unmodified F9 v.1.2 with just the altered prop and He load procedure?

If any mods were made to the Iridium booster because of the accident investigation (I don't know if there were any), then I'd expect those same mods to be made to the SES-10 booster.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Peter B. de Selding ‏@pbdes  2h2 hours ago
@SES_Satellites still intends SES-10 (5,300kg/GTO) as 1st @SpaceX mission using previously flown Falcon 9 1st stage. Planned Q1 launch.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/820971443605434368

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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If the payload has been shipped that usually indicates a launch ~ 30 days later. Putting a SES launch at end of Feb. It is possible that by the end of Feb the launch count for the year could be 4 ;D

Offline envy887

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If the payload has been shipped that usually indicates a launch ~ 30 days later. Putting a SES launch at end of Feb. It is possible that by the end of Feb the launch count for the year could be 4 ;D

That would be hitting the 2 per month pace they reported want.

Offline gongora

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SpaceX is starting their FCC applications for GTO mission F9-33, which I'm guessing is this one (EchoStar 23 should be F9-31, CRS-10 would be F9-32).

Offline wannamoonbase

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If the payload has been shipped that usually indicates a launch ~ 30 days later. Putting a SES launch at end of Feb. It is possible that by the end of Feb the launch count for the year could be 4 ;D

That would be hitting the 2 per month pace they reported want.

That would huge so soon after return to flight.  That would be a most impressive cadence and they wouldn't need to improve that to have an incredible year.
Jonesing for a copy of 'Tales of Suspense #39'

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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When you think about it, the AMOS-6 accident didn't really seriously affect the procedures that are really critical to launch cadence: pad flow, production and testing. It just meant that they're going to have to look again and tanking and possibly, in the mid-term, redesign the upper stage LOX and He systems.

So long as they can get the feed of payloads and rockets onto pads that are turning around at the right rate, then there is no reason why they can't manage 2/month. This is especially so given as launches will be spread around LC-39A, -40 and -4E in such a way that the individual HIFs, payload preparation facilities and pads will have longer than 2 weeks between launches.
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Offline Navier–Stokes

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SES-10 currently targeting NET February 22 according to Spaceflight Now:

SES 10 telecom satellite in Florida for launch on reused SpaceX rocket
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Assuming the final launch pad work is completed in the coming days, and SpaceX can launch its next two missions on, or close to, their current target dates, the launch of SES 10 could occur around Feb. 22, at the earliest, an SES official told Spaceflight Now.

Offline douglas100

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When you think about it, the AMOS-6 accident didn't really seriously affect the procedures that are really critical to launch cadence....
Disagree. The loss of use of SLC-40 is bound to affect launch cadence.

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...This is especially so given as launches will be spread around LC-39A, -40 and -4E in such a way that the individual HIFs, payload preparation facilities and pads will have longer than 2 weeks between launches...

You can't spread missions between Vandenberg and the other pads. If SLC-4E is out of action then polar missions like Iridium are going to be held up. And you obviously can't spread missions between LC-39A and SLC-40 until 40 is repaired.
Douglas Clark

Offline envy887

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When you think about it, the AMOS-6 accident didn't really seriously affect the procedures that are really critical to launch cadence....
Disagree. The loss of use of SLC-40 is bound to affect launch cadence.

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...This is especially so given as launches will be spread around LC-39A, -40 and -4E in such a way that the individual HIFs, payload preparation facilities and pads will have longer than 2 weeks between launches...

You can't spread missions between Vandenberg and the other pads. If SLC-4E is out of action then polar missions like Iridium are going to be held up. And you obviously can't spread missions between LC-39A and SLC-40 until 40 is repaired.

Polar missions can't launch from the Cape. And getting payloads on-site fast enough might be an issue. Iridium can't launch again until April.

But each pad has on average 4 weeks (or 6, once 40 is back up) to prepare a mission to keep the total flight rate at once every 2 weeks. They were getting missions through as fast as once every 3 weeks at LC-40 last year. Is there any evidence that SLC-4 and LC-39A will not be able to match that if the launch vehicles and spacecraft are available?

Online M.E.T.

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When you think about it, the AMOS-6 accident didn't really seriously affect the procedures that are really critical to launch cadence....
Disagree. The loss of use of SLC-40 is bound to affect launch cadence.

Quote
...This is especially so given as launches will be spread around LC-39A, -40 and -4E in such a way that the individual HIFs, payload preparation facilities and pads will have longer than 2 weeks between launches...

You can't spread missions between Vandenberg and the other pads. If SLC-4E is out of action then polar missions like Iridium are going to be held up. And you obviously can't spread missions between LC-39A and SLC-40 until 40 is repaired.

Polar missions can't launch from the Cape. And getting payloads on-site fast enough might be an issue. Iridium can't launch again until April.

But each pad has on average 4 weeks (or 6, once 40 is back up) to prepare a mission to keep the total flight rate at once every 2 weeks. They were getting missions through as fast as once every 3 weeks at LC-40 last year. Is there any evidence that SLC-4 and LC-39A will not be able to match that if the launch vehicles and spacecraft are available?

Well it seems to me they are targeting an even faster turnaround than that. Currently it seems that just LC39A will be targeting a launch every 2 weeks, at least as far as the first 3 launches are concerned. Currently we are tentatively looking at 26 Jan, 8 Feb and 22 Feb, all from LC39A.

So anyting from Vandenberg will be on top of that.

Online guckyfan

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Well it seems to me they are targeting an even faster turnaround than that. Currently it seems that just LC39A will be targeting a launch every 2 weeks, at least as far as the first 3 launches are concerned. Currently we are tentatively looking at 26 Jan, 8 Feb and 22 Feb, all from LC39A.

So anyting from Vandenberg will be on top of that.

I am quite sure with a sufficiently large pad crew they can have turn around times of even less than 2 weeks. But on average weather, pad range availability, ISS related shifts, installing the crew access arm and getting FH launch ready will slow them down a lot.
« Last Edit: 01/18/2017 09:49 PM by guckyfan »

Offline gongora

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On Reddit /u/Spiiice (a SpaceX employee) made the following comment:
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1021 passes through Texas before the Cape, yes.
(S/N 1021 = F9-23 = CRS-8 Core = SES-10 Core)

Offline gongora

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This appears to be the FCC application for the SES-10 landing, since the operational start date is Feb. 20.  I still don't see an application for the EchoStar 23 landing?

North  28  15  19    West  74  1  18    Autonomous Drone Ship, within 10 nautical miles

Online docmordrid

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This appears to be the FCC application for the SES-10 landing, since the operational start date is Feb. 20.  I still don't see an application for the EchoStar 23 landing?

North  28  15  19    West  74  1  18    Autonomous Drone Ship, within 10 nautical miles

Another first: the first re-landing of a stage.
DM

Offline Flying Beaver

This appears to be the FCC application for the SES-10 landing, since the operational start date is Feb. 20.  I still don't see an application for the EchoStar 23 landing?

North  28  15  19    West  74  1  18    Autonomous Drone Ship, within 10 nautical miles

Another first: the first re-landing of a stage.

Hopefully, heaviest GTO mission to date.
Watched B1019 land in person 21/12/2015.

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