Author Topic: What were the greatest decisions/accomplishments in US space history?  (Read 9454 times)

Offline Jim

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So far, you're not very convincing.  You have given a version of events around Sputnik that is at odds with every account I've read before.  You don't have any source to cite.  Even worse, you refer to primary sources in the National Archives.  That would seem to indicate there are no books or articles that have been written supporting your theory, which brings up the question of why such secondary sources don't exist.  There's lots of interest in the events surrounding Sputnik, so lots of historians have surely researched it.  Why didn't any of them come to the same conclusions you did?  Or, if one or more of them did, why are you mentioning the National Archives instead?


MrTim is correct.  Ike wanted to establish freedom of passage for satellites.
The reason that past histories were wrong is that the information was classified.  Not until the release of Corona data did the truth come out. 

Discoverer (Corona) tried to launch in Jan 59.  This was only after a few Juno 1 & 2, Vanguard and Pioneer launches. 

Secret Empire: Eisenhower, the CIA, and the Hidden Story of America's Space Espionage
« Last Edit: 12/28/2013 11:04 am by Jim »

Offline geza

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Easily to enlist many of them. I restrict myself to two.

(1) Human Moon. The small step was the closing one for the Copernican revolution: Standing on a celestial body, other than Earth, has become a part of human experience. The Apollo 8 moment, seeing our world as a celestial body on the sky, was the last-but-one step.

(2) Voyager Grand Tour. The Solar System, as a whole, has become area of human activity.

Science included...

Offline apollolanding

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After reading the Centaur history, I would have to say developing hydrolox engines/stages despite VonBraun's initial reluctance has to rank up near the top.  RL-10/Centaur paving the way for RL-10/S-IV, J-2/S-II & S-IVB, SSME, etc...  Oops, just saw that USFdon already listed this.
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Offline AS-503

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After reading the Centaur history, I would have to say developing hydrolox engines/stages despite VonBraun's initial reluctance has to rank up near the top.  RL-10/Centaur paving the way for RL-10/S-IV, J-2/S-II & S-IVB, SSME, etc...  Oops, just saw that USFdon already listed this.

Edkyle had mention "Abe Silversteins leadership on liquid hydrogen." up thread.
Stages to Saturn (Roger Bilstein) highlights Silverstein's gamble into new territory of LH2.

Offline MarsMethanogen

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After reading the Centaur history, I would have to say developing hydrolox engines/stages despite VonBraun's initial reluctance has to rank up near the top.  RL-10/Centaur paving the way for RL-10/S-IV, J-2/S-II & S-IVB, SSME, etc...  Oops, just saw that USFdon already listed this.

Edkyle had mention "Abe Silversteins leadership on liquid hydrogen." up thread.
Stages to Saturn (Roger Bilstein) highlights Silverstein's gamble into new territory of LH2.

Mentioned frequently in the Forum, but worth mentioning again in this (Silverstein) context is "Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket; 1958-2002 by Dawson and Bowles.  NASA History Series.  SP-2004-4230.

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