Author Topic: Information about Angara rocket  (Read 258277 times)

Offline Space Pete

Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #40 on: 07/19/2010 12:37 PM »
RIA Novosti: "Russia to start testing new Angara rocket in 2013".
Quote
Test launches of Russia's new booster rocket, the Angara, are to start in 2013, the rocket designer said on Thursday.

Vladimir Nesterov, head of the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, said the rocket assembly would be completed in the first quarter of 2011, adding that the first-stage engine was "99% ready" and the second-stage engine had already been tested three times.

He said the only problem that could affect the schedule of tests was delays in the purchase of ground-based equipment that the center was unable to order due to underfunding.

Angara rockets, designed to provide lifting capabilities between 2,000 and 40,500 kg into low earth orbit, are expected to become the core of Russia's unmanned launcher fleet, replacing several existing systems.

The main purpose of the Angara rocket family is to give Russia independent access to space. The rockets will reduce Russia's dependence on the Baikonur space center it leases from Kazakhstan by allowing the launch of heavy payloads from more northerly sites such as Plesetsk and a new space center in Russia's Far East.

Khrunichev is also developing a super-heavy-lift version, the Angara 7, capable of orbiting payloads of 45 to 75 tons, and for which there is no equivalent in Russia's current rocket fleet.

MOSCOW, July 15 (RIA Novosti)
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20100715/159826586.html
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #41 on: 08/05/2010 10:46 PM »
Khrunichev Space Center PAO: "Cold Tests of Universal Rocket Module URM-2 for Angara Launcher will Continue in August".

NITS RKP, Peresvet, continues cold firing tests of Universal Rocket Module URM-2 for Angara launcher. URM-2 is to be used in the third stage of the rocket. The first and second sessions of the cold firing tests have been completed in June-July.

URM-2 bench firing tests are planned for the third quarter of 2010. Firing tests of the URM-1 for the first stage of Angara have been completed in 2009.

Development of the Angara launcher is the high-priority national objective. Angara‘s customers are Russian Federal Space Agency and the Ministry of Defense. Khrunichev Space Center is the prime contractor in the project.

www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=10023&lang=en
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Offline Dmitry_V_home

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #42 on: 11/18/2010 03:36 PM »
Today have taken place fire test URM-2. Duration of 399 seconds. Full success!

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #43 on: 11/19/2010 01:37 PM »
Testing the universal rocket module URM-2 rocket Angara http://www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=13792

Offline Danderman

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #44 on: 12/29/2010 05:44 PM »






Its the equivalent of the Soyuz Blok-I, using the RD-0124A engine, a variant of the Soyuz-2 upper stage engine.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2010 05:45 PM by Danderman »

Offline anik

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #45 on: 03/31/2011 05:13 PM »
http://www.khrunichev.ru/main.php?id=1&nid=2012

The first (suborbital) launch of Angara-1.2PP rocket is planned in the second quarter 2013, the first (orbital) launch of Angara-A5 - in the fourth quarter 2013.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #46 on: 04/01/2011 04:02 AM »
http://www.khrunichev.ru/main.php?id=1&nid=2012

The first (suborbital) launch of Angara-1.2PP rocket is planned in the second quarter 2013, the first (orbital) launch of Angara-A5 - in the fourth quarter 2013.

I thought the first suborbital launch happened in 2009, and the second in 2010, over the Eastern Cosmodrome.

Offline fregate

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #47 on: 04/29/2011 01:54 PM »
From RIA Novosti multimidea presentation about Khrunichev strategic Space Exploration Program 2020-2050
« Last Edit: 04/29/2011 01:55 PM by fregate »
"Selene, the Moon. Selenginsk, an old town in Siberia: moon-rocket  town" Vladimir Nabokov

Offline Danderman

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #48 on: 04/29/2011 02:59 PM »
I wonder if the A7 variant can use the same GSE for installing the strapons as does Proton.

Offline Dmitry_V_home

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #49 on: 04/29/2011 04:10 PM »
Angara-A7

Offline Downix

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #50 on: 04/29/2011 04:40 PM »
While interesting, I can see issues with their layout of A5 vs A7.  A5 straps the boosters to the core in a cross arrangement, while A7 straps them in a hexagon.  This means that either a) your core will be heavier due to the need to support not 6 mounts, but 8 due to the different connection points of boosters 3 and 4 in the two arrangements, or b) the core is customized between the two, which increases cost to produce and overhead needs.

A slight change would solve this.  Instead of a cross, simply consider it an A7 arrangement, but leave off boosters 5 and 6.  I've taken a moment to make a picture to demonstrate how this would work, and attached it here.  By doing so, they can improve both their production cost and overhead, and there is no loss in performance for this arrangement in my experience.  The only concern comes with staging, releasing both boosters on each side at the same time can cause a collision in rare scenarios.  There are several solutions for this, but the simplest is to not stage them simultaneously.  So, boosters 1,2 stage, 4 seconds later boosters 3,4 stage.  The RD-191 engine allows for the throttling down, so to ensure smooth hand-off for this, is you run the center at a lower thrust for most of the flight, the minimum is 40% but I suspect 50-60% would be better but I don't have the time to run through the full calculations. 15 seconds before staging, you throttle down boosters 3,4 to 70% while keeping boosters 1,2 at 100%, then once boosters 1,2 stage, you throttle up boosters 3,4 to 100% and when booster 3,4 stage you then throttle up the core to 100%. What this does is slow down acceleration slightly as you stage, which reduces the g-force stress on the payload and smooths out the fuel burn rate.
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Offline zaitcev

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #51 on: 04/29/2011 05:15 PM »
A7 is designed with a larger diameter core, which is still barely railroad-compatible. Probably same size as Rus-M core or similar. It should be enough for clean separation or the 6 URM-1.

Offline Moe Grills

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #52 on: 04/29/2011 07:37 PM »
  1154 tonnes launch mass.
Launch thrust must be at least 1,300 tonnes then.
 
40.5 tonnes to low earth orbit? Wow.
That's better than the Falcon 9 Heavy capability.

Offline Downix

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #53 on: 04/29/2011 08:43 PM »
A7 is designed with a larger diameter core, which is still barely railroad-compatible. Probably same size as Rus-M core or similar. It should be enough for clean separation or the 6 URM-1.
It would be.  Although, they may just adapt the Proton tooling of 4.15 meters as well.

And yes, a larger core stage would make for cleaner separation.
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Offline grdja

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #54 on: 04/30/2011 01:36 PM »
A7 using larger diameter core and being specifically noted to be intended  for beyond LEO manned exploration; all that clearly translates into "will never be built, ever".

Offline ArbitraryConstant

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #55 on: 05/31/2011 07:58 PM »
  1154 tonnes launch mass.
Launch thrust must be at least 1,300 tonnes then.
 
40.5 tonnes to low earth orbit? Wow.
That's better than the Falcon 9 Heavy capability.
Somewhat less from what SpaceX has disclosed since you made this post, though Angara's LH2 will be an advantage for GTO.

Both vehicles will benefit from customers taking advantage of the greater lift, which some might be reluctant to do if it were only one provider.

Offline Prober

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #56 on: 06/02/2011 10:48 PM »
May 23, 2011

First RD191 Production Engine Delivery

In May 19, 2011 OAO NPO Energomash delivered the first RD191 production engine No. D023 to Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center (SRPSC). The engine is intended for the utilization within Angara 1.2 launch vehicle first launching. 5 more RD191 production engines No., No. D012-D016 are to be delivered to SRPSC to provide Flight Design Testing of Angara 5 heavy class Launch Vehicle.

« Last Edit: 06/03/2011 08:44 PM by Prober »
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Online Stan Black

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #57 on: 06/04/2011 08:50 AM »
“ANGARA” LAUNCH VEHICLE FAMILY CONCEPT, DEVELOPMENT STATUS
AND OPERATIONAL PLANS
 
A. Medvedev, A. Kuzin, E. Motorny, Khrunichev Space Center, Russia,
B. Katorgin, NPO Energomash, Russia
 
http://propulsion2002.aaaf.asso.fr/papers.html

Offline libs0n

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #58 on: 06/04/2011 07:05 PM »
I'd like to propose a booster recovery option for the Angara vehicles, as opposed to the hypothetical Baikal flyback stage, that the vehicle is ideally suited for.

1. Parachutes - to slow the descent
2. Airbags - to cushion the impact
3. Helicopter retrieval of the booster - to return the booster for remanufacture.

The vehicle seems ideally suited for this for the following reasons.  The boosters stage at a lower velocity than in a TSTO vehicle.  The landing zone of Angaras launched from Baikonur would be over land; I not familiar with the landing zones from the new launch sites within Russia.  The booster mass is within the payload capability of a helicopter for retrieval.

This is similar to the plan to recover Zenits in Energia, except that concept included retro rockets and landing legs, while this uses a Kistler like airbag system, although either method would be open for the manufacturer to pursue.  There is also an American concept for mid-air helicopter retrieval that would be applicable to this method.

I present this idea as this seems like a low hanging fruit idea for booster reuse.  It first came to mind during discussion of an all NK-33 powered Soyuz, as in that case it would have allowed for preservation of the legacy engine stock over a larger amount of flights.

edit:

The closing section of the PDF in the post above mine implies that there are intermediate options for booster reusability that can be pursued prior to development of flyback boosters.

"At the same time, with an existence
of the RD-191M engine’s reusable version
and with an introduction of necessary
changes into the design of the URM-1 basic
module itself, we can start with the “inter-
mediate” version of the first stage’s univer-
sal booster with limited level of reusability. "

"We are convinced that practical reali-
zation of the modular concept as well as an
introduction of reusability for separate
stages (modules) of space launch vehicles
are one of the most promising ways for
radical enhancement of operational capabili-
ties and reducing costs of current and ad-
vanced space transportation systems."
« Last Edit: 06/04/2011 09:50 PM by libs0n »

Offline Danderman

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Re: Information about Angara rocket
« Reply #59 on: 09/23/2011 04:50 PM »
Balterek, which is Angara A5 launched from Site 250 at Baikonour, is a joint venture of Russia and Kazakh, and has been delayed until 2017:

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/baikonur_energia_250.html#delays

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