Author Topic: Galileo Deployment.  (Read 31139 times)

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #40 on: 06/10/2017 12:40 pm »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo/Launching_Galileo/Galileo_grows_two_more_satellites_join_working_constellation

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Two further satellites have formally become part of Europe’s Galileo satnav system, broadcasting timing and navigation signals worldwide while also picking up distress calls across the planet.

These are the 15th and 16th satellites to join the network, two of the four Galileos that were launched together by Ariane 5 on 17 November, and the first additions to the working constellation since the start of Galileo Initial Services on 15 December.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #41 on: 06/22/2017 08:28 pm »
ESA and the European Commission awarding the Bremen-based satellite producer a contract for a further eight navigation satellites

Bremen, Paris, June 22, 2017. OHB System AG was awarded a contract to produce additional eight navigation satellites for the Galileo programme.
Signed today, the contract is worth EUR 324 million. This will increase the number of Galileo FOC satellites supplied by OHB to a total of 30, of which the first 14 are already in orbit.

“This procurement from OHB will enable to complete the Galileo constellation and have reserves both in-obit and on-ground. The 30 satellites added to the 4 IOV satellites now bring the necessary infrastructure robustness that is essential for the provision of Galileo services world-wide. We are looking forward to work once more with OHB in the next phase” stated Paul Verhoef, ESA’s Director of Satellite Navigation.

“I am very pleased that after delivering 22 satellites under the first two contracts OHB has now also retained the confidence of ESA and the European Commission in the third bid. We are proud of being able to make such a crucial contribution to this major European project that will be providing so many people around the world with valuable services,” said Marco Fuchs, CEO of OHB-System AG, after signing the contract in Paris on June 22nd, 2017.

Continuation of the proven satellite design
“Our modular satellite design is outstanding and has proven itself with superb results. A large part of the satellites that we have already assembled have demonstrated their full functional capability in space. For this reason, there will be no major changes to the design of the eight new satellites. At this stage, we are working on the basis of a first launch date in 2020,” says Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, director of navigation at OHB System AG, who previously oversaw the development of the first and second satellite batch.
In its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager, OHB is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification.

Successful partnerships to be continued
OHB will be able to rely on proven partnerships and subcontractors. As with the previous two contracts, the OHB UK partner Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) has contributed also to this successful offer with the navigation payloads.
Management Board member Dr. Ingo Engeln, who is responsible for OHB System AG’s institutional space projects, is pleased to be able to continue production of the satellites. “Our proven processes and structures, the seven assembly islands in Bremen, the corresponding facilities at the other integration and testing sites and, not least of all, the highly trained teams at participating companies provide an ideal basis for expanding the satellite constellation swiftly.” This together with the modular design of the satellites will ensure that a pair of two satellites can be delivered within three months after the pair of satellites delivered before.

Shaping the future
Obviously, OHB wants to continue contributing to this beneficial project in the future. In Bremen, it is already working on designs for the next-generation Galileo satellites. In various studies for ESA, the engineers are exploring new materials and components and further services to be provided by the next generation. Needless to say, they are incorporating the experience gained from engineering and producing the previous navigation satellites. In this way, OHB can contribute proposals for the design of the next-generation satellites and offer the customer the benefits of the unique experience that it has gained from the successful first series.

from left to right  W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA
from left to right W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA

Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE
Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE

Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.
Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.

https://www.ohb-system.de/press-releases-details/serial-success-ohb-wins-third-tender-for-galileo-satellites.html

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #42 on: 08/19/2017 06:45 am »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #43 on: 09/16/2017 12:09 am »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5 32,5mln/Sat
One on a Vega-C costs 35mln if I'm not mistaken.
The single Sat on Vega-C should the most expensive launch option per satellite.

Two on A62 is a waist of money. This is EU funded, so paid by European citizens via taxes. My opinion is that wasting public money is very bad. (Also US government launched procurement, from all companies.)

The disadvantages of launching four at a time instead of two are:
1) launch rate goes down from 1/year to 1/2years (24x Galileo satellites with 12year service live.)
2) production and processing is more demanding (2sats/year vs. 4sats/2year

There is a second reason I'm against using A6 to launch FOC Sat 23-26. Using A6 would keen that the Galileo  system wouldn't contain 24 sats until after 2020. (4xIOC + 22×FOC - 2x FOC wrong orbit, - 1x defect = 23 after 2018.
They should order another (4th) A5ES Galileo for FOC 23-26 with a launch date in 2019. Or dual Soyuz or a single Vega-C launch during 2019.
« Last Edit: 07/28/2018 01:53 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline calapine

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #44 on: 09/16/2017 04:51 am »
Before we start a debate:

Is it sure that Vega-C will be able to launch a single Galileo at all?
Same question regarding Ariane 62 and quad-launches

I'm a bit sceptical of both to be honest.


Offline Mike Jones

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #45 on: 09/16/2017 05:54 am »
Vega C was targeted at 35 M€ (not dollars) and lacks performance in its current version to even launch a single Galileo sat to MEO @ 22000km.

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #46 on: 09/16/2017 11:42 am »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2017 11:43 am by Skyrocket »

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #47 on: 09/16/2017 11:24 pm »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
launching one of the first gen Galileo sats on Vega Family is not possible due to the deployment architecture being designed only to launch in pairs and and quads. If launching one on Vega it would require asymmetrical mounting with moveable ballast as at sep the upper stages center of gravity would shift to the side opposite of the satellites location and would induct an end over end spin preventing the CCAM and deorbit maneuvers.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #48 on: 10/05/2017 10:24 pm »
New contract award for OHB: European Commission orders a further four Galileo satellites

Bremen, October 5, 2017


The European Commission has exercised one of its contractual options for the European Galileo navigation system and ordered a further four satellites from OHB System AG. As recently as in June 2017, the Bremen-based satellite producer had been awarded a contract for eight Galileo FOC*) satellites under the Batch 3 tender. “Once again, the quality of our navigation satellites has spoken for itself. I am very grateful to the European Commission and the European Space Agency ESA for the confidence which they have placed in us and our partners,” says Marco Fuchs, Chief Executive Officer of OHB SE.

“Following the completion of the satellites under the contract awarded in June, we will be commencing work seamlessly on the four satellites under the new contract. The ambitious schedule means that looking forward reserve satellites will be available both in orbit and on the ground,” adds Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, who is the member of the OHB System AG Management Board responsible for navigation, Earth observation and science.

The contract for the four satellites has a value of EUR 157.75 million. As with the previous contracts, OHB System AG in its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification. The contract increases the total number of Galileo satellites ordered from OHB System AG to 34. Of these, 14 are already in orbit. The satellite constellation is to be expanded incrementally.

Assembly work on the Ariane 6 launcher to commence in October
With a mass of 750 kilograms each, the Batch 3 satellites will be placed in their respective orbit approximately 23,000 kilometers above the surface of the Earth by Ariane 6 2 launchers. MT Aerospace AG, a subsidiary of OHB SE, is the largest supplier for the Ariane program outside the Ariane group. The Augsburg-based company supplies almost all of the tank and structural components for the new launcher. “Production will be commencing at the beginning of 2018 at the new halls built for this purpose in Augsburg,” says Hans J. Steininger, Chief Executive Officer of MT Aerospace AG. “We will be starting work on completing the upper stage tanks for the Ariane 6 at the MT hall at Bremen airport in the near future. With a floor area of 4,000 square meters, the hall has been specially built for this purpose.”

About the Galileo system
The European Galileo satellite navigation system will offer people in Europe and around the world numerous positioning, navigation and timekeeping services. Under the tender for Batch 3 in June 2017, a contract for the delivery of eight satellites was awarded to OHB System AG, followed now by a further four satellites, bringing to 26 the total of satellites produced to date. Of these,18 are currently in orbit. Preliminary Galileo services went live on December 15, 2016 in a preliminary step towards full operational mode. The constellation is to be expanded with the addition of further satellites. This incrementally increases the capabilities and global availability of the system.
More information on Galileo can be found on the ESA website at: http://www.esa.int/esasearch?q=Galileo&r=lokale_nachrichten_deutschland
and http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

*) The Full Operational Capability phase of the Galileo program is managed and fully funded by the European Union. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. The views expressed in this Press Release can in no way be taken to reflect the opinion of the European Union and/or ESA. “Galileo” is a trademark subject to OHIM application number 002742237 by EU and ESA.

For further Information please contact:

Julia Riedl
Corporate Communications
Phone: +49 8153 4002 249
Fax: +49 8153 4002 99 249
E-Mail: [email protected]

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #49 on: 10/20/2017 01:33 pm »
http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_Council_October_2017

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The ESA Council, chaired by Jean-Yves Le Gall, met on 17–18 October in Paris, France.

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The Director of Navigation, Paul Verhoef, presented the status of Galileo and plans for the Second Generation.

With 18 satellites now in orbit, a full constellation will include eight more satellites to be launched by mid-2018, providing 99.8% global coverage.

Hardware manufacturers like Samsung are including Galileo in their chipsets, the latest being Apple in the new generation of iPhones, unveiled last month.

“A technical benchmarking of the different satellite navigation systems has demonstrated that Europe is already the ‘best in class’ in terms of precision,” commented ESA Director General Jan Woerner.

Preparations are under way for the second generation of Galileo.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/10/Galileo_in_smartphones

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Galileo in smartphones

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system seen at work with commercially available Samsung S8+ smartphones.

The sky has been full of Galileo signals since Europe’s satnav system began Initial Services at the end of last year, and a steady stream of Galileo-ready devices is finding its way to the marketplace.

This has been underpinned with years of effort by ESA’s Navigation Laboratory, working with European manufacturers of mass-market satnav chips and receivers as well as ESA’s Galileo team in cooperation with the European Global Navigation Satellite System Agency.

Industry responded to Initial Services by making the first Galileo-enabled smartphones available to the public. The list of available devices includes phones from Apple, BQ, Huawei, Samsung and Sony.

Image credit: ESA–G. Porter,   CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
« Last Edit: 10/20/2017 04:44 pm by bolun »

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #50 on: 07/26/2018 04:04 pm »
A question now that the last batch of the original satellites have been launched - there are 26 satellites in orbit now but only 22 that can be functional (so far - I don't know if the clock problems (?) on FOC FM-04/GSAT 0204 is permanent), with 0104's power problems seems to be unsolvable and 0201/0202 in a wrong orbit.

Until more replacement satellites are launched and enter service in 2021-ish, how much performance penalty would the constellation have from the original planned 3 x 8 "FOC complete constellation"?
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline GWR64

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #51 on: 07/26/2018 09:29 pm »
Quote
(so far - I don't know if the clock problems (?) on FOC FM-04/GSAT 0204 is permanent),

cryptic NAGU:

Quote
NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2017045
DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2017-11-23 17:45
NAGU TYPE: GENERAL
NAGU NUMBER: 2017045
NAGU SUBJECT: GSAT0204 REMOVED FROM ACTIVE SERVICE FOR CONSTELLATION MANAGEMENT PURPOSES
NAGU REFERENCED TO: N/A
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2017-12-08 07:30
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: GSAT0204
EVENT DESCRIPTION: GALILEO SATELLITE GSAT0204 NOT CONTRIBUTING TO SERVICE PROVISION (ALL SIGNALS) FROM 2017-12-08 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

I`m guessing:
GSAT-0204 has no working hydrogen clock anymore. The problems with these clocks (if they still work) can be avoided in orbit.
The rubidium-clocks in the FOC satellites until 2016 (?) may fail due to a manufacturing defect.
(does not affect the IOV satellites)
Since the rubidium-clocks on GSAT-0204 can fail without warning, the satellite spared during the "Initial Service".
After that, he will be put back into operation and will work as long as possible.
« Last Edit: 07/27/2018 07:07 am by GWR64 »

Offline GWR64

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #52 on: 07/28/2018 08:19 am »
Galileo: from GIOVE to constellation



Paul Verhoef describes the plan at 2:29

two satellites in an elliptical orbit ... we can still use it ...
(GSAT0201 and GSAT0202, but, as far as I know, the orbit cannot be imaged in the almanac)
one satellite is a reserve ... (GSAT0204)
one satellite is faulty ... (GSAT0104)

in brackets from me
« Last Edit: 07/28/2018 08:31 am by GWR64 »

Offline nzguy

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #53 on: 07/29/2018 12:29 am »
Yes GSAT0201/0202 can be used by receiver with ephemeris but not the almanac from current ICD version as there is not enough range in one or the orbit parameters. It's possible to update the Galileo ICD to increase the parameter range which would allow them in the almanac but GNSS receivers will need a firmware update to recognise them.

Decent GNSS receivers would still find them without almanac but the cell phone receivers might not. The low power chips used in phones often do not run full PRN searches as they rely on the almanac downloaded over the Internet.

I think even with a few satellites missing the availability will be in high 90s percentage. Most receivers also use GPS so I doubt it will be an issue for the several minutes a day there isn't 4 Galileo visible.

Offline TripleSeven

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #54 on: 07/29/2018 12:46 am »
Yes GSAT0201/0202 can be used by receiver with ephemeris but not the almanac from current ICD version as there is not enough range in one or the orbit parameters. It's possible to update the Galileo ICD to increase the parameter range which would allow them in the almanac but GNSS receivers will need a firmware update to recognise them.

Decent GNSS receivers would still find them without almanac but the cell phone receivers might not. The low power chips used in phones often do not run full PRN searches as they rely on the almanac downloaded over the Internet.

I think even with a few satellites missing the availability will be in high 90s percentage. Most receivers also use GPS so I doubt it will be an issue for the several minutes a day there isn't 4 Galileo visible.

Our PBN systems use GPS primary but we can also take signals from Galileo...the computer rarely does :)

here at IST my station monitors all of the nav systems in range...the Chinese are below the horizon but the Indian geo sats are mostly visible...the Polot Hotel does a little blockage :)

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #55 on: 12/04/2018 06:09 pm »
Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet

4 December 2018

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system – already serving users globally – has now provided a historic service to the physics community worldwide, enabling the most accurate measurement ever made of how shifts in gravity alter the passing of time, a key element of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity.

Two European fundamental physics teams working in parallel have independently achieved about a fivefold improvement in measuring accuracy of the gravity-driven time dilation effect known as ‘gravitational redshift’.

The prestigious Physical Review Letters journal has just published the independent results obtained from both consortiums, gathered from more than a thousand days of data obtained from the pair of Galileo satellites in elongated orbits.

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_satellites_prove_Einstein_s_Relativity_Theory_to_highest_accuracy_yet

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #56 on: 12/04/2018 08:44 pm »
Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet

...gathered from more than a thousand days of data obtained from the pair of Galileo satellites in elongated orbits.

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_satellites_prove_Einstein_s_Relativity_Theory_to_highest_accuracy_yet

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Offline nzguy

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #57 on: 01/09/2019 08:46 am »
This article from December has some interesting updates coming for Galileo: https://www.gpsworld.com/galileo-moves-toward-foc/

It was mentioned the July 2018 launched sats were supposed to be online by end of the last year, but have not yet been set healthy. Hopefully they will finish their checkout soon.

They also plan to but the 0201 and 0202 elliptical orbit sats into the operational constellation as part of the 24 satellite FOC constellation after a software update on those sats. I guess this means they reckon there won't be too much degradation vs a constellation with all 24 sats in the right orbits.

The next batch of 12 satellites is under construction for launch starting late 2020 to finish off the constellation.

A bunch of ground infrastructure is getting upgraded over next few years which will bring some new features online (including some that aren't in the published ICDs yet) like the COSPAS-SARSAT return link message, E1 navigation data authentication/anti spoofing, expanded I/NAV data, E6 high accuracy signal (which will also be encrypted with public access to provide extra authentication/anti spoofing).

Finally work has started on the design of the next generation of Galileo satellites with new signals for launch in 2025.

The future looks great for Galileo after all those initial setbacks.

Offline nzguy

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #58 on: 02/08/2019 12:25 am »
Latest update from Galileo om the four satellites launched in July: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Four_new_Galileos_join_Europe_s_largest_satellite_constellation

So far my receivers still show them as unhealthy and https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information still shows them under commissioning.

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #59 on: 02/08/2019 11:57 am »
Latest update from Galileo om the four satellites launched in July: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Four_new_Galileos_join_Europe_s_largest_satellite_constellation

So far my receivers still show them as unhealthy and https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information still shows them under commissioning.

the above is the formal process, the switch over from IOT to "live" is coming ;-)

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