Author Topic: Which commercial crew vehicle would you choose to be transported on?  (Read 31147 times)

Offline TomH

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Yeah, if a mod sees this please change this thread into a poll thread.

Well if it is changed to a poll, it would need to specify whether you go as a passive passenger (which isn't much different than being cargo) or you get to be the commander and be in control of the spacecraft (which means you get to pilot DC on the trip down).

Offline Oli

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The safest would be CST-100. Parachutes and airbags, no toxic fuels.

Dreamchaser would be the coolest and most comfortable.

I'd pick Dragon for landing on Mars.
« Last Edit: 09/02/2013 03:55 am by Oli »

Offline Robotbeat

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CST-100 uses regular old hypergols.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline brihath

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I would be happy to fly on any ofthe vehicles, but my emotional preference is the Dream Chaser.  There is just something about being able to step out of the vehicle onto a runway after returning from orbit, as compared to those crew members in the Soyuz who land, get rolled around and end up sitting upside down in their couches.

Offline Lars_J

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I would be happy to fly on any ofthe vehicles, but my emotional preference is the Dream Chaser.  There is just something about being able to step out of the vehicle onto a runway after returning from orbit, as compared to those crew members in the Soyuz who land, get rolled around and end up sitting upside down in their couches.

Then you will be happy to know that the nominal landing for Dragon and CST-100 is right side up, with a much reduced chance of rolling around like Soyuz.

Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

Offline Robotbeat

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I would be happy to fly on any ofthe vehicles, but my emotional preference is the Dream Chaser.  There is just something about being able to step out of the vehicle onto a runway after returning from orbit, as compared to those crew members in the Soyuz who land, get rolled around and end up sitting upside down in their couches.
Huh? Neither of the other two options (three, if you still include Blue Origin) would give you that result.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Zed_Noir

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I would be happy to fly on any ofthe vehicles, but my emotional preference is the Dream Chaser.  There is just something about being able to step out of the vehicle onto a runway after returning from orbit, as compared to those crew members in the Soyuz who land, get rolled around and end up sitting upside down in their couches.

Then you will be happy to know that the nominal landing for Dragon and CST-100 is right side up, with a much reduced chance of rolling around like Soyuz.

Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

My preference is the Dragon & Falcon 9 combo. With the CST-100 and Falcon 9 combo a close second. IMO the Atlas V will price itself off the commercial crew program.

If the Dreamchaser ditches in the sea, there is a chance it will pop up and cartwheel like most modern airliners. Also putting a liftbody airframe exposed on top of a LV will be interesting on the way up.

Offline dchill

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Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

I believe they have the ability to bail out and can/will carry parachutes, individual life rafts, life jackets and handheld radios.  The ascent does mostly follow the coastline, so I think most aborts still have an excellent chance of getting to a runway anyway.

Offline Zed_Noir

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Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

I believe they have the ability to bail out and can/will carry parachutes, individual life rafts, life jackets and handheld radios.  The ascent does mostly follow the coastline, so I think most aborts still have an excellent chance of getting to a runway anyway.

That would interesting since I don't recall the astronauts will be carrying the extra mass in escape & survival gear. Never mind how they are going egress from the vehicle's rear hatch after reentry while still in the air.

Offline Lars_J

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Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

I believe they have the ability to bail out and can/will carry parachutes, individual life rafts, life jackets and handheld radios.  The ascent does mostly follow the coastline, so I think most aborts still have an excellent chance of getting to a runway anyway.

That would interesting since I don't recall the astronauts will be carrying the extra mass in escape & survival gear. Never mind how they are going egress from the vehicle's rear hatch after reentry while still in the air.

Yeah, that seems hard to believe, especially if it happens pretty early during ascent. But they could have sufficient margins. I look forward to seeing more details about abort options.
« Last Edit: 09/08/2013 05:05 am by Lars_J »

Offline Robotbeat

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I look forward to how in heck they're going to get the hybrid motors to work as well as they need them to.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Rocket Science

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I would be happy to fly on any ofthe vehicles, but my emotional preference is the Dream Chaser.  There is just something about being able to step out of the vehicle onto a runway after returning from orbit, as compared to those crew members in the Soyuz who land, get rolled around and end up sitting upside down in their couches.

Then you will be happy to know that the nominal landing for Dragon and CST-100 is right side up, with a much reduced chance of rolling around like Soyuz.

Dream chaser does sound good, but my greatest question about it is how it would handle ditching into the sea, which would occur if an abort was made during most of the ascent.

My preference is the Dragon & Falcon 9 combo. With the CST-100 and Falcon 9 combo a close second. IMO the Atlas V will price itself off the commercial crew program.

If the Dreamchaser ditches in the sea, there is a chance it will pop up and cartwheel like most modern airliners. Also putting a liftbody airframe exposed on top of a LV will be interesting on the way up.
Most aircraft that cartwheel when ditching is due to an engine pod or wingtip catching a wave. Have a good look at Dream Chaser's lifting body shape; looks a bit like a boat doesn’t it?  ;)
« Last Edit: 09/08/2013 01:33 pm by Rocket Science »
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline Oli

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^

Water at that speed (354 kph) is like concrete. As long as the surface of the water is not absolutely flat I guess ditching Dreamchaser would tear it apart. Also I'm not sure for how long it would float.
« Last Edit: 09/08/2013 06:52 pm by Oli »

Offline Rocket Science

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^

Water at that speed (354 kph) is like concrete. As long as the surface of the water is not absolutely flat I guess ditching Dreamchaser would tear it apart. Also I'm not sure for how long it would float.
See Convair F2Y Sea Dart... ;)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline Overflow

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Dreamchaser. I can't help it. I'm a fan.

Plus it looks pretty cool too.  8)

Offline Zed_Noir

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^

Water at that speed (354 kph) is like concrete. As long as the surface of the water is not absolutely flat I guess ditching Dreamchaser would tear it apart. Also I'm not sure for how long it would float.
See Convair F2Y Sea Dart... ;)

The Convair F2Y got water ski landing gears that is almost half the length of the plane and was powered. Nothing like dead-sticking a liftbody onto water.

Offline Oli

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^

And apparently it came down at only 231.5 kph.

Or 125 knots vs Dreamchaser's 191 knots.

Offline Rocket Science

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^

And apparently it came down at only 231.5 kph.

Or 125 knots vs Dreamchaser's 191 knots.
So at least you learned that you can land a stout closed coupled airframe on the ocean either by regular ops as the Sea Dart and in an emergency with Dream Chaser. Ditch testing behavior is part of design studies in a water tank.  As I pilot I have been trained for water landings and technique is similar to a soft field one. This has been discussed over and over again on the main DC threads. Have a look!  ;)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline Oli

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^

Have I? What about Zed_Noir's points?

Also, as has been mentioned in another thread before, HL-20 was supposed to do ocean landing with parachutes and airbags. Is there any official info on this from SNC?


Offline Rocket Science

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We talked about all that as well. No chutes on Dream Chaser... The DC threads are really worth having a look at, great discussions!
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator, Vintage auto racer

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