Author Topic: Nanoracks  (Read 25692 times)

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #20 on: 11/05/2013 07:19 PM »
Spaceflight Joins with NanoRacks to Deploy Satellites from the International Space Station

http://spaceflightservices.com/spaceflight-joins-with-nanoracks-to-deploy-satellites-from-the-international-space-station/


November 4th, 2013 – Seattle, WA- Spaceflight Inc. (Spaceflight), a leading provider of launch services for small and secondary payloads, and NanoRacks LLC (NanoRacks), a leader in commercializing space operations on and deployment from the International Space Station, formally announce a partnership to provide commercial launch services from the International Space Station (ISS).

Commenting on the partnership, Curt Blake, Senior Vice President and General Counsel at Spaceflight, said, “We are very excited to work with NanoRacks and leverage the unique capabilities of the International Space Station. The partnership is a great fit between two like-minded organizations that will help usher in a new chapter for low earth orbit satellite deployment.”

Under this partnership Spaceflight and NanoRacks are collaborating to provide customers routine commercial launch services from the ISS. Each customer spacecraft will be deployed from the ISS via the Japanese Experiment Module airlock utilizing NanoRacks’ Cubesat Deployers. NanoRacks operates via its Space Act Agreement with NASA.
« Last Edit: 11/05/2013 07:20 PM by Danderman »

Offline Danderman

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Commercial Solutions for Microgravity Experiments (in London)
« Reply #21 on: 11/07/2013 05:02 PM »
IISC Workshop: Commercial Solutions for Microgravity Experiments

http://www.isunet.edu/news-and-media-center-2/1279-iisc-workshop-commercial-solutions-for-microgravity-experiments

The International Institute of Space Commerce (IISC) in partnership with the International Space University (ISU) is inviting you to its next workshop on Wednesday 4th December 2013 taking place at the prestigious Royal Astronomical Society in London. The theme for this stakeholder workshop is “Commercial Solutions for Microgravity Experiments”. 

Panelists

The IISC has asked a number of those prominent, like amongst others Virgin Galactic in this new sector to participate in a workshop on this topic, in line with the IISC’s think-tank philosophy. Specialists in various fields will present their suggested solutions, which will be followed by a panel discussion comparing the different approaches.

XCOR Aerospace’s Director of Payload Sales & Operations, Ms Khaki Rodway will discuss the Lynx suborbital vehicle capabilities and its research and education missions.    "This is an exciting time to be thinking about space experiments, and I am truly looking forward to attending the IISC Workshop to discuss how commercial suborbital spaceflight will give microgravity researchers low cost and more frequent access to space."

Jeffrey Manber, managing director of NanoRacks will highlight his company’s commercial biopharma program now on International Space Station which has attracted customers from industry and academia.

Jose Maria Lopez-Urdiales of Zero2Infinity, an alumnus of ISU, will present an alternative approach using hi-altitude balloons accommodating automated microgravity experiments:  "In microgravity experimentation, it's time to change paradigms and embrace commercial solutions that can be cost-effective, capable and nimble."
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 05:03 PM by Danderman »

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #22 on: 11/10/2013 04:47 PM »
So from http://www.klofas.com/papers/klofas_amsat2013.pdf the 28+ Flock-1 cubesats, all from one single company, will utilize deployers from Nanoracks. How will they be put on the Antares upper stage and released?
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #23 on: 11/10/2013 06:05 PM »
So from http://www.klofas.com/papers/klofas_amsat2013.pdf the 28+ Flock-1 cubesats, all from one single company, will utilize deployers from Nanoracks. How will they be put on the Antares upper stage and released?

Apparently they will be deployed from the ISS, not from the upper stage. But to be sure, i have sent an inquiry to Nanoracks.

Offline pericynthion

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #24 on: 11/11/2013 07:02 PM »
Yes, the Flock-1 nanosats will be deployed from ISS via the Kibo airlock using the JEMRMS.

Offline VatTas

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #25 on: 11/12/2013 01:55 PM »
From NanoRacks facebook:
Quote
A lineup of satellites have been installed in the NanoRacks Cubesat Deployer, and are ready for their trip to the International Space Station!

According to one poster:
Quote
The satellites are (from left to right): LithuanicaSat, LitSat, SkyCube, ArduSat-2, and UAPSat.

Offline dcporter

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #26 on: 11/13/2013 03:03 AM »
Go Nanoracks!

Is there a thread or a resource anywhere with details on how satellites can be safely popped out of Kibo, presumably bound for many different orbits, without getting in the way of Station or each other? Forum search + about five minutes on Google were fruitless.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #27 on: 11/13/2013 04:00 AM »
Go Nanoracks!

Is there a thread or a resource anywhere with details on how satellites can be safely popped out of Kibo, presumably bound for many different orbits, without getting in the way of Station or each other? Forum search + about five minutes on Google were fruitless.

Since this is a new deployer, I don't think you will find much on it. If you are interested in the earlier deployer, there is probably info at the nanoracks.com site.


Offline pericynthion

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #28 on: 11/13/2013 04:06 AM »
Is there a thread or a resource anywhere with details on how satellites can be safely popped out of Kibo, presumably bound for many different orbits, without getting in the way of Station or each other? Forum search + about five minutes on Google were fruitless.

I'm not sure how much public information there is, but it is definitely carefully considered.

Unless the nanosatellites have propulsion (and I'm not aware of any to be deployed from the ISS that do, partly for crew safety reasons), they will all be deployed into orbits very similar to that of the ISS.  The deployer provides a small delta V, of order 1 m/s IIRC.  However, the direction of deployment and the position of the JEMRMS are carefully chosen to ensure an initial trajectory away from the station, and due to the square-cube law the nanosats always have a much smaller ballistic coefficient than the ISS (this is also an explicit requirement for Nanoracks cubesat payloads, so you can't launch a brick of lead).  The smaller BC leads to a fairly rapid departure from Station's orbit as apogee and perigee both decrease, ensuring no possibility of recontact.

Offline dcporter

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #29 on: 11/13/2013 04:29 AM »
Square/cube law means the smaller thing has less mass per surface area, so less inertia to power through the amount of atmo it'll run into? So Kibo-bound cubesats are destined for a lower (and presumably not terribly long-lived) orbit than Station? (Which resolves the issue of potentially running back into them during a Progress-reboost?) And if falling to a lower orbit, therefore deployed retrograde?

If yes to all then yay. If not then hopefully on-topic enough for some correction.

Offline pericynthion

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #30 on: 11/13/2013 05:05 AM »
You got it.  The deployment impulse might or might not be directly retrograde since there are other directions which could potentially give a more desirable trajectory with respect to the station structure during the first minutes after release.  Otherwise, spot on.

Offline VatTas

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #31 on: 11/13/2013 07:04 AM »
If I understand this correctly, satellites will be deployed from right end (see the picture above). Thing on the left looks like loaded spring.

Offline VatTas

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #32 on: 11/13/2013 11:08 AM »
Square/cube law means the smaller thing has less mass per surface area, so less inertia to power through the amount of atmo it'll run into? So Kibo-bound cubesats are destined for a lower (and presumably not terribly long-lived) orbit than Station? (Which resolves the issue of potentially running back into them during a Progress-reboost?) And if falling to a lower orbit, therefore deployed retrograde?
Per response I got from LituanicaSAT team, cubesats are deployed 45o down (from ISS orbit) retrograde.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #33 on: 11/20/2013 03:17 AM »
http://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/Right-This-Way-to-the-Space-Station-232395141.html

Right This Way to the Space Station
A new company makes it easier to get your experiments to orbit.

"NanoRacks, which Manber established in 2009, provides a pioneering service for anyone who wants to place an experiment in space. The company is named for the platforms—racks—it built to house small science experiments on the space station. Now permanently installed in Japan’s Kibo module, two NanoRacks have a total of 32 locker spaces for small, cube-shaped laboratories—NanoLabs, the company calls them—that plug into the station’s power supply and data ports. But a NanoRacks customer gets more than a box for an experiment. The company offers advice about available equipment and instruction in how to use it—initially, with tutorials like “How to Build a NanoRacks Payload,” which can be downloaded from the company website. NanoRacks staff also perform the safety review required for station occupancy, get the box assigned to a launch manifest, fill out the thousands of pages of paperwork, provide support and data collection while the experiment is on the station, and, if required, make sure it’s returned to Earth."


« Last Edit: 11/20/2013 03:17 AM by Danderman »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #34 on: 11/21/2013 09:17 PM »
Quote
The satellites are (from left to right): LithuanicaSat, LitSat, SkyCube, ArduSat-2, and UAPSat.
Is there a timeline for this deployment?

Offline pericynthion

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #35 on: 11/21/2013 09:25 PM »
There isn't a date set yet.  It will probably be between January and March 2014.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #36 on: 11/29/2013 04:16 PM »


Just released, but recorded a few months back.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #37 on: 12/27/2013 06:49 PM »
A Microfluidic, High Throughput Protein Crystal Growth Method for Microgravity

http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3836816/

I am not going to try to quote any part of this article, but it is a great description of the work Nanoracks did to generate protein crystals aboard a commercial facility at the International Space Station.

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #38 on: 01/24/2014 02:54 PM »
Emerald Bio Announces New Partnership to Study Therapeutic Targets in Space

http://www.embios.com/news/bid/366529/Emerald-Bio-Announces-New-Partnership-to-Study-Therapeutic-Targets-in-Space

VEDFORD, Mass. – Jan. 8, 2014 –Emerald Bio, world class protein science researchers and drug discovery experts integrating structure-guided drug discovery and target knowledge to transform the treatment of disease, announced today a partnership with industry, academic and nonprofit organizations to explore the effects of microgravity on crystallization of two challenging therapeutic targets implicated in cancer and cardiovascular disease. The company is collaborating with the Broad Institute, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), NanoRacks and Protein BioSolutions.

Protein growth studies in microgravity, or space, allow life scientists to determine the structures of specific therapeutic targets, in turn enabling future drug discovery and insight into treating disease. Proteins grown in microgravity may produce larger, better-organized crystals. According to NASA, protein crystal growth experiments have flown on past space shuttle missions since 1985.

 

“The Broad Institute aspires to transform the process of drug discovery and the treatment of human disease by developing and applying novel drug discovery technologies to vital medical problems,” said Brian Hubbard, director of the Therapeutics Projects Group within the Broad‘s Center for the Science of Therapeutics. “This unique collaboration with Emerald Bio, as well as with CASIS, NanoRacks and Protein BioSolutions, will provide us with the needed protein structures and drug discovery insights to enable our teams to evaluate the three-dimensional crystal structures of two important therapeutic targets.”

During the study, Emerald Bio and its partners will test their hypothesis that microgravity will provide an improved environment for crystal growth of Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a key gene that drives elevated levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein 1 (MCL1), one of the most commonly altered genes in cancer.

 
“As Emerald Bio seeks to transform the treatment of disease through our structure-guided drug discovery solutions and our comprehensive target knowledge, we are excited to collaborate with the Broad Institute, CASIS, NanoRacks and Protein BioSolutions on this new study,” said Johan Pontin, CEO of Emerald Bio. “Given that proteins are at the heart of all disease, microgravity may prove to be integral to developing novel treatments for disorders. This information may help to advance our target-centric drug discovery efforts as our teams further integrate biophysics and comprehensive target knowledge to alter the treatment of disease.”

Offline Danderman

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Re: Nanoracks
« Reply #39 on: 02/13/2014 02:29 PM »

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