Author Topic: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018  (Read 45161 times)

Offline SciNews

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #100 on: 09/13/2018 04:57 AM »
Short presentation of the mission

and orbit


Offline catdlr

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #101 on: 09/13/2018 06:05 AM »
LAUNCH ALERT

                              Brian Webb
                  [email protected]
                        www.spacearchive.info

                           2018 September 12 (Wednesday) 19:17 PDT
----------------------------------------------------------------------

                     SATURDAY VANDENBERG LAUNCH
                           by Brian Webb

A Delta II rocket carrying a NASA satellite is scheduled for launch
from Vandenberg AFB, California this Saturday morning (September 15)
during a 05:46-06:26 PDT launch window.

Following liftoff from Space Launch Complex 2-West, the rocket will
climb vertically for several seconds before beginning a gradual turn
towards the south. If the launch goes as planned, the Delta will place
NASA's IceSat-2 elevation measuring satellite into orbit.

Weather permitting, the early portion of the launch could be visible
to the unaided eye as far away as Santa Rosa, Marysville, Fresno,
Bakersfield, San Bernardino, and Mexicali, California and Ensenada,
Mexico. Observers located further east may have difficulty seeing the
launch because of the brightness of the sky from the approaching
sunrise.

The vehicle's flame will initially be a bright orange color due to the
four solid rocket motors (SRMs) strapped to the rocket's first stage.
Following SRM burnout and jettison, the spent motors will continue to
burn as they tumble and fall away and may appear to flash. Meanwhile,
the rocket's first stage engine will continue running and the Delta
will resemble a slowly moving white star until Main Engine Cutoff
(MECO) near stage 1/stage 2 separations.

If the launch happens early in the window, a Twilight Effect will not
occur because it's too early for the Delta to catch the sun's rays
during the first stage burn. However, observers in dark locations may
still be able to see the dim, tenuous exhaust plume behind the rocket.
A photograph of a Delta II launch under similar lighting conditions (a
dawn launch, but too long before sunrise for a Twilight Effect) is
posted at http://www.spacearchive.info/delta-ii-iridium-ms-11.htm.

However, there is still an opportunity for a Twilight Effect to happen.
If liftoff takes place at 06:00, the vehicle will enter sunlight at T+
3 minutes 55 seconds (near the end of the first stage burn). A 06:26
PDT liftoff has the Delta entering sunlight much earlier at T+ 1 minute
45 seconds. Even if a Twilight Effect occurs, it will probably be
underwhelming since the sunlight will be reflecting off of the plume
(a dusk Twilight Effect tends to be more impressive because of the
sunlight shines through the exhaust plume as seen from the western U.S.
and Mexico).

If you plan to view the launch near the coast, be aware there's a real
possibility the event could be obscured by low clouds or fog. For the
best view, find an observing site above the haze or marine layer with
an unobstructed horizon towards the launch site and downrange ocean
area.

Regardless of where you plan to go to view the launch, allow yourself
enough time to get there well before liftoff. After you arrive, be
aware of your surroundings and possible hazards such as traffic.

For launch status and countdown information, go to:

     https://spaceflightnow.com

     https://www.nasa.gov/live/

     https://www.ulalaunch.com

For information on viewing Vandenberg rocket and missile launches, go
to:

     www.spacearchive.info/vafbview.htm

If you plan to use an Internet countdown feed for launch event cueing,
be aware the feed may be delayed by more than a minute. Instead, use a
GPS receiver or another source such as the National Institute of
Standards and Technology (www.time.gov) to obtain the exact time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Copyright 2018, Brian Webb. All rights reserved. No portion of this
newsletter may be used without identifying Launch Alert as the
source and providing a functioning hyperlink or text that point to
http://www.spacearchive.info/newsletter.htm.
______________________________________________________________
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #102 on: 09/13/2018 04:00 PM »
About the ICESat-2 Launch Window

Anna Heiney  September 13, 2018

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, is scheduled to launch Saturday, Sept. 15, at 5:46 a.m. PDT (8:46 a.m. EDT). There is a 40-minute launch opportunity within the spacecraft launch window, which extends for 2 hours, 34 minutes. The 40-minute window is determined by super-cold liquid oxygen temperature (cryogenic propellant) effects on the Delta II rocket. The team is targeting the earliest opportunity within the spacecraft window, which could shift based on launch operations.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #103 on: 09/13/2018 05:16 PM »
ICESat-2 Prelaunch Mission Briefing Today

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, is being prepared for liftoff Saturday aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The launch window opens at 8:46 a.m. EDT (5:46 a.m. PDT).

NASA will host a prelaunch mission briefing today at 4 p.m. EDT (1 p.m. PDT). The briefing will be broadcast on NASA TV. Scheduled participants are:

Tom Wagner, ICESat-2 program scientist at NASA Headquarters
Doug McLennan, ICESat-2 project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
Cathy Richardson, Deputy Program Manager, Earth Science Projects Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Tom Neumann, ICESat-2 deputy project scientist at Goddard
Lori Magruder, ICESat-2 science definition team lead at the University of Texas at Austin
Helen Fricker, ICESat-2 science definition team member at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Bill Barnhart, ICESat-2 program manager at Northrop Grumman
Tim Dunn, launch director at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center
Scott Messer, program manager for NASA Programs at United Launch Alliance
1st Lt. Daniel Smith, launch weather officer with the 30th Space Wing at Vandenberg
Media and the public may ask questions during the briefing using #askNASA.

Offline Joffan

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #104 on: 09/13/2018 07:07 PM »
Just to keep it bundled with this mission thread, I'll tag William Graham's excellent long-article retrospective on the evolution of Delta II (from Thor) that this launch marks the final mission for.
Max Q for humanity becoming spacefaring

Offline catdlr

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #105 on: 09/13/2018 09:21 PM »
Delta II ICESat-2 Mission Profile


United Launch Alliance
Published on Sep 13, 2018

A United Launch Alliance Delta II Heavy rocket will launch NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation-2 (ICESat-2) mission from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The ICESat-2 mission will be the final for the workhorse Delta II rocket, which has launched 154 times, including missions for the U.S. Air Force, NASA, the National Reconnaissance Office, and commercial customers. Go Delta! Go ICESat-2!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmdXxLlF3Os?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #106 on: 09/14/2018 01:28 AM »
ICESat-2 Proceeds Toward Launch Sept. 15

Anna Heiney September 13, 2018

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, mission and launch teams today concluded a successful Launch Readiness Review. There are no technical issues being worked at this time. Teams are proceeding toward liftoff from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base on Saturday, Sept. 15, at 5:46 a.m. PDT (8:46 a.m. EDT) on a United Launch Alliance Delta II, the rocket’s final mission.

ICESat-2 will measure the height of our changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses per second. The satellite will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which measures the travel times of laser pulses to calculate the distance between the spacecraft and Earth’s surface. ICESat-2 will provide scientists with height measurements that create a global portrait of Earth’s third dimension, gathering data that can precisely track changes of terrain, including glaciers, sea ice and forests.

The U.S. Air Force 30th Space Wing weather officer indicated that they are predicting a 100 percent chance of favorable weather on launch day.

Offline PahTo

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #107 on: 09/14/2018 04:00 AM »

Will this Delta II employ GEM 40 or GEM 46 SRMs?  I note it is referenced as a "Heavy", yet I thought the GEM 40 is utilized in the 7420 configuration.  As well, will the 2nd stage do a deorbit burn or decay on its own?
Any which way--Go ICESat-2!  Go (final) Delta II!

Offline ZachS09

Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #108 on: 09/14/2018 06:00 AM »

Will this Delta II employ GEM 40 or GEM 46 SRMs?  I note it is referenced as a "Heavy", yet I thought the GEM 40 is utilized in the 7420 configuration.  As well, will the 2nd stage do a deorbit burn or decay on its own?
Any which way--Go ICESat-2!  Go (final) Delta II!

GEM-40 boosters will be used. There never has and never will be a Delta II with three or four GEM-46 boosters. In addition, Vandenberg SLC-2W was never modified to accommodate the Heavy version.

As for the second stage, it probably will have enough fuel to deorbit after all payloads are deployed.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #109 on: 09/14/2018 09:41 AM »
Here's the press kit and poster.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #110 on: 09/14/2018 01:32 PM »
ICEsat-2 brochure plus two other docs, plus the misison logo

Offline Newton_V

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #111 on: 09/14/2018 05:40 PM »
As well, will the 2nd stage do a deorbit burn or decay on its own?

There is a de-orbit burn.

Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #112 on: 09/14/2018 08:00 PM »
On September 15, the launch window opens at 5:46am PDT and the live broadcast begins at 5:10am PDT
https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1040674615637540865?p=v

Online Chris Bergin

Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #113 on: 09/15/2018 03:35 AM »
FEATURE ARTICLE: Delta II to conclude an amazing legacy with ICESat-2 launch

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/09/delta-end-legacy-icesat-2-launch/

- By William Graham.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #114 on: 09/15/2018 04:10 AM »
ICESat-2 Weather Remains Favorable for Launch

Stephanie Martin September 14, 2018

Weather remains favorable for the Sept. 15 launch of NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. The latest forecast from the U.S. Air Force 30th Space Wing predicts a 100 percent chance of favorable weather on launch day with patchy fog and visibility of 2-3 miles.

The spacecraft window opens at 5:46 a.m. PDT (8:46 a.m. EDT) and extends for 2 hours, 34 minutes.

The launch vehicle window is now approximately 50 minutes based on the launch team’s decision to load RP-1 fuel during the countdown, approximately 2 hours and 40 minutes prior to the beginning of the launch window.

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #115 on: 09/15/2018 04:34 AM »
Ed Kyle will be delighted to see this very last Thor decorated with stars and the number 381 inside the Delta triangle.  :)

Thomas Zurbuchen

@Dr_ThomasZ

A star bearing the name of @NASAEarth Science Director Mike Freilich will fly on @ULAlaunch's #DeltaII rocket that'll carry #ICESat2 to orbit. This small token of gratitude does not equate for his dedicated service to #NASAScience & work to further the study of our home planet.

https://twitter.com/Dr_ThomasZ/status/1040811701850001408
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #116 on: 09/15/2018 05:16 AM »
I just got back from the pad and they still had not done tower rollback, which was supposed to happen around 6:45 PM. The consensus of the guys with me, none of whom are tied to the launch, was that it's not looking like they will launch.

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #117 on: 09/15/2018 07:21 AM »
Quote
The Mobile Service Tower is rolling back from the ULA #DeltaII with NASA's #ICESat2 mission @NASA_LSP

https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1040852360459939841?s=21

Quote
We have Tower Rollback!

https://twitter.com/nasa_edge/status/1040852630459826176?s=21
« Last Edit: 09/15/2018 07:23 AM by Ronsmytheiii »
"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #118 on: 09/15/2018 08:15 AM »
Photo posted by NASA

Offline SciNews

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #119 on: 09/15/2018 08:23 AM »
A little late, but here it is: The final Delta II rocket ready to launch ICESat-2 (rocket & payload integration)

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