Author Topic: Mars Terraforming discussion  (Read 57505 times)

Offline Slarty1080

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Re: Mars Terraforming discussion
« Reply #280 on: 12/10/2018 10:59 pm »
Instead of tunnels why not just build greenhouses / domes slowly extending them over the entire surface of the planet. What gas and water there is on Mars would then be more concentrated close to the surface.
The first words spoken on Mars: "Humans have been wondering if there was any life on the planet Mars for many decades well ... there is now!"

Offline KelvinZero

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Re: Mars Terraforming discussion
« Reply #281 on: 12/10/2018 11:22 pm »
Instead of tunnels why not just build greenhouses / domes slowly extending them over the entire surface of the planet. What gas and water there is on Mars would then be more concentrated close to the surface.
The word for that is paraterraforming :)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraforming#Paraterraforming

My pet idea (that everyone here hears about ad-nauseam, and I have probably already inserted into this thread) is ocean forming.

Terraforming is hard and worlds like Mars will never be like earth, but we can trivially create earth-like ocean environments under the ice on thousands of dwarf planets in this system. It could even happen without it being a goal, just by virtue of our waste heat. A megawatt of waste heat would be enough to maintain a globe of water a kilometer in diameter under the ice on mars, and the radius (not the volume) goes up  proportional to the wattage of waste heat. Entire worlds can become earthlike oceans under protective eggshells of ice.

On mars you might be able to grow this ocean using just solar power. I think there are vast regions of mars away from the poles that have tens of meters of ice beneath them. Direct heat under the ice and create some lighter than water roof material that will sit on top and prevent evaporation, eg plastic bags spat out by a sausage maker, mostly water with a bubble of air. I think you need about 200kg of weight per square meter, but only a few kg of plastic. This roofed lake could grow naturally as your settlement grows, until it is continent-sized.
« Last Edit: 12/10/2018 11:22 pm by KelvinZero »

Offline Slarty1080

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Re: Mars Terraforming discussion
« Reply #282 on: 12/11/2018 02:34 pm »
Instead of tunnels why not just build greenhouses / domes slowly extending them over the entire surface of the planet. What gas and water there is on Mars would then be more concentrated close to the surface.
The word for that is paraterraforming :)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraforming#Paraterraforming

My pet idea (that everyone here hears about ad-nauseam, and I have probably already inserted into this thread) is ocean forming.

Terraforming is hard and worlds like Mars will never be like earth, but we can trivially create earth-like ocean environments under the ice on thousands of dwarf planets in this system. It could even happen without it being a goal, just by virtue of our waste heat. A megawatt of waste heat would be enough to maintain a globe of water a kilometer in diameter under the ice on mars, and the radius (not the volume) goes up  proportional to the wattage of waste heat. Entire worlds can become earthlike oceans under protective eggshells of ice.

On mars you might be able to grow this ocean using just solar power. I think there are vast regions of mars away from the poles that have tens of meters of ice beneath them. Direct heat under the ice and create some lighter than water roof material that will sit on top and prevent evaporation, eg plastic bags spat out by a sausage maker, mostly water with a bubble of air. I think you need about 200kg of weight per square meter, but only a few kg of plastic. This roofed lake could grow naturally as your settlement grows, until it is continent-sized.

It seems that this Paraterraforming could start as soon as there's a Mars base (ok on a tiny scale but start nevertheless...) given enough raw materials, which we know are present, the tunnels and domes can slowly expand outward covering more and more land. But with coventional terraforming you don't realy reap the benifits of any outlay for a long time.
The first words spoken on Mars: "Humans have been wondering if there was any life on the planet Mars for many decades well ... there is now!"

Tags: Chemistry