Author Topic: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread  (Read 348198 times)

Offline Chris Bergin

« Last Edit: 03/18/2014 02:18 pm by Chris Bergin »
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Offline Jason Sole

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #1 on: 02/11/2013 04:33 am »
Thanks Chris. Great to see this one getting closer to launch!

Offline sdsds

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #2 on: 02/11/2013 04:34 am »
Nice article! It seems safe to assume that after the doublers were installed the pressurization test was repeated ... and it passed. That's somewhat implied by, "Lockheed Martin is now deep into outfitting work," right?
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Offline BrightLight

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #3 on: 02/11/2013 02:26 pm »
Great update - Thanks Chris

Offline TomH

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #4 on: 02/11/2013 04:14 pm »
Great article again, Chris.

A few questions come to mind:

These doublers, are they like the construction technique called sistering, wherein a weakened joist has another bolted to it for added strength? If so, I would think this is a one time solution for an already damaged prototype. If it serves the purpose on this unmanned test flight, that probably works. In the long term, however, a better solution would be needed. If memory serves correctly, the capsule is already around 9,000 lb. overweight and needs mass reduction. A design modification seems more appropriate than doubling the parts (and doubling the mass-on that part) for strength.

Since Orions will not be reused, will they be scrapped to recycle the titanium and other valuable materials?

Thanks,
Tom
« Last Edit: 02/11/2013 04:57 pm by TomH »

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #5 on: 02/12/2013 01:47 am »
Thanks very much guys.

Tom - I'll ask and see what more we can find out.
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Offline Lars_J

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #6 on: 02/12/2013 01:59 am »
Since Orions will not be reused, will they be scrapped to recycle the titanium and other valuable materials?

NASA may be short on funds, but not THAT short. (I hope) :)

I would imagine that they would end up on display in museums eventually.

Offline TomH

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #7 on: 02/12/2013 03:44 am »
Since Orions will not be reused, will they be scrapped to recycle the titanium and other valuable materials?

NASA may be short on funds, but not THAT short. (I hope) :)

I would imagine that they would end up on display in museums eventually.

You may be right. Auction them on eBay and see what museum (or individual) pays the most. For the first couple of dozen, that likely would fetch more money than scrapping to salvage the titanium.

Offline sdsds

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #8 on: 02/12/2013 05:16 am »
In the long term, however, a better solution would be needed. If memory serves correctly, the capsule is already around 9,000 lb. overweight and needs mass reduction. A design modification seems more appropriate than doubling the parts (and doubling the mass-on that part) for strength.

In what was said initially about the root cause it seemed they already had a design modification planned. (A beam that was bolted to the bulkheads was stiffer than anticipated, IIRC; lessening the stiffness of that beam might also reduce mass as a side effect!)
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Offline Jim

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #9 on: 02/12/2013 12:00 pm »

You may be right. Auction them on eBay and see what museum (or individual) pays the most. For the first couple of dozen, that likely would fetch more money than scrapping to salvage the titanium.

Unlikely to be that many

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #10 on: 02/12/2013 04:29 pm »
Orion Spacecraft ‏@NASA_Orion
Orion CPAS team just completed the EDU-A-CDT-3-8 airdrop test in Yuma, AZ. All visuals indicate a nominal parachute test.
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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #11 on: 02/12/2013 06:36 pm »
RELEASE: 13-048

NASA'S ORION LANDS SAFELY ON TWO OF THREE PARACHUTES IN TEST

WASHINGTON -- NASA engineers have demonstrated the agency's Orion
spacecraft can land safely if one of its three main parachutes fails
to inflate during deployment.

The test was conducted Tuesday in Yuma, Ariz., with the parachutes
attached to a test article. Engineers rigged the parachutes so only
two would inflate, leaving the third to flag behind, when the test
capsule was dropped from a plane 25,000 feet above the Arizona
desert.

"Today is a great validation of the parachute system," said Chris
Johnson, a NASA project manager for Orion's parachute system. "We
never intend to have a parachute fail, but we've proven that if we
do, the system is robust for our crew to make it to the ground
safely."

Orion's parachutes will perform in ways no landing system for a
spacecraft carrying humans has been required to do before. Because
Orion will return to Earth from greater distances, it will re-enter
Earth's atmosphere at speeds of more than 20,000 mph. After re-entry,
astronauts will rely on the parachutes to slow the spacecraft for a
gentle splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

This 21,000-pound capsule needs only two main parachutes and one
drogue parachute. But NASA spacecraft, particularly those carrying
humans, are designed to keep working when something goes wrong. So,
Orion will be equipped with three main parachutes and two drogues,
providing each system one backup parachute.

In December, engineers simulated a failure of one of the drogue
parachutes in a test that ended with a safe landing, proving the
system design is valid.

Tuesday's test was the eighth parachute engineering development drop
test. The next is scheduled for May. The system also will be put to
the test in 2014 when Orion makes its first flight test. During the
mission, an uncrewed capsule will travel 3,600 miles from Earth,
farther than any spacecraft designed to carry humans has gone in more
than 40 years.

To join the online conversation about Orion, follow @NASA_Orion and
the hashtag #Orion. To learn more about all the ways to connect and
collaborate with NASA, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/connect

For information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

Offline TomH

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #12 on: 02/13/2013 04:34 pm »
Orion's parachutes will perform in ways no landing system for a spacecraft carrying humans has been required to do before. Because Orion will return to Earth from greater distances, it will re-enter
Earth's atmosphere at speeds of more than 20,000 mph.

Apollo lunar returns had a V of 25,000 m.p.h. @ reentry interface. Mars returns are projected @ c. 32,000 m.p.h. Surely he is referring only to EFT-1. In any case, it should not affect the chutes; drag will slow the capsule to same V @ time of deployment regardless of reentry V.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #13 on: 02/20/2013 03:23 pm »
Mainly about EFT-1, so I'll stick this in here - it's based around those happy chaps at the ASAP:

Safety Panel impressed with challenged Exploration Program:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/02/safety-panel-impressed-challenged-exploration-program/
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Offline jkumpire

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #14 on: 02/20/2013 06:37 pm »
Chris,

A very nice article, especially as it details the slow-motion death by strangulation of Orion and SLS. No money + bureaucracy = death of US HSF, or at least BEO HSF.   

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #15 on: 02/20/2013 09:27 pm »
Chris,

A very nice article, especially as it details the slow-motion death by strangulation of Orion and SLS. No money + bureaucracy = death of US HSF, or at least BEO HSF.   

Thanks!

And blimey, the head of the ASAP (VADM Joe Dyer (USN Ret.)) tweeted the article.
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Offline jkumpire

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #16 on: 02/20/2013 09:38 pm »
Chris,

A very nice article, especially as it details the slow-motion death by strangulation of Orion and SLS. No money + bureaucracy = death of US HSF, or at least BEO HSF.   

Thanks!

And blimey, the head of the ASAP (VADM Joe Dyer (USN Ret.)) tweeted the article.

He probably didn't see my post, I hope :)

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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #17 on: 02/20/2013 09:41 pm »
Chris,

A very nice article, especially as it details the slow-motion death by strangulation of Orion and SLS. No money + bureaucracy = death of US HSF, or at least BEO HSF.   
And remember, Orion and SLS is just the /bottom/ of the stack of things used for BEO HSF. All the stuff above it that is actually needed to actually do something once you get there (Deep Space Hab, SEV, any kind of manned lander, in-space propulsive tug, etc) has essentially no money at all (just study money) in an effort to keep Orion and SLS afloat (since Orion and SLS have much more powerful Congressional support). Even this wouldn't be so bad if NASA didn't have to face all these budget crises all the time.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #18 on: 02/22/2013 04:38 am »
Another EFT-1 related article, but did some more on a LAS feature run, so will give this a standalone too:

ATK Launch Abort hardware arrives at KSC ahead of EFT-1
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/02/atk-launch-abort-system-arrives-ksc-eft-1/
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Re: Orion EFT-1 Pre-Mission Update Thread
« Reply #19 on: 02/22/2013 12:14 pm »
Report #J13-005

NASA’S ORION ENGINEERS AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS IN SEATTLE

HOUSTON--NASA is building a new spacecraft to carry humans farther than ever before as we begin the next era of exploration. Seattle media are invited to learn more about Orion when engineers helping design the spacecraft are in Seattle on Feb. 26 and 27.

While in the area for program meetings at a local company producing elements of the spacecraft, several members of NASA’s Orion crew module team will be speaking with the public and available for interviews.

NASA’s Stuart McClung, manager for the Orion crew module landing and recovery system, and Larry Price, deputy program manager with Lockheed Martin, the primary Orion contractor, will be speak at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at The Museum of Flight. The event is open to the public without charge.

Howard Hu, deputy manager of NASA’s Orion vehicle integration office, and Nujoud Merancy, Orion systems engineer, will speak with students at the University of Washington. Both are University of Washington alumni and Seattle natives. The event is not open to the public, but interview opportunities will be available.

Charlie Lundquist, NASA’s crew and service module manager for Orion, and Price will be available on Feb. 27 for interviews at Aerojet, a Seattle-area company building the launch abort system jettison motor and reaction control system elements for Orion’s first test flights. Julie Van Kleeck, Aerojet’s vice president for space and launch systems, also will be available.

Hu and Merancy will speak again with students at the University of Washington that day.

Other interview opportunities are available on request. Contact Dan Huot at [email protected] for details on any of these opportunities.

The Orion spacecraft will have the ability to send humans to the moon, asteroids and eventually Mars. Its first uncrewed test flight will take place next year, when it will be launched farther into space than any spacecraft designed for humans has gone in more than 40 years, and return to Earth at speeds greater than 20,000 mph.

Further information – including photos, videos and b-roll – on the Orion program can be found at:
http://www.nasa.gov/orion


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