Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : December 15, 2018  (Read 65227 times)

Offline beidou

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« Last Edit: 09/12/2018 01:59 AM by gongora »

Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #1 on: 04/29/2013 08:40 PM »
A question might be off topic: are there any additional payloads (except the navigation payload) on GPS satellites? As they have more than three or four times mass compared to peers of Galileo satellites, which are only about 800kg heavy.
« Last Edit: 04/29/2013 08:43 PM by beidou »

Online russianhalo117

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #2 on: 05/03/2013 05:07 PM »
PRESS RELEASE:
LINK: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2013/february/Feb28.html

Lockheed Martin Powers on the First GPS III Satellite

DENVER,  Feb. 28,  2013 – The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] team developing the U.S. Air Force’s next generation Global Positioning System III  satellites has turned on power to the system module of the program’s first spacecraft, designated GPS III Space Vehicle One (SV-1). The milestone is a key indication the team is on track to deliver the first satellite for launch availability in 2014.
The GPS III program will affordably replace aging GPS satellites, while improving capability to meet the evolving demands of military, commercial and civilian users. GPS III satellites will deliver better accuracy and improved anti-jamming power while enhancing the spacecraft’s design life and adding a new civil signal designed to be interoperable with international global navigation satellite systems.
“This milestone is the latest in a series of critical events signifying that our joint government and industry GPS III team is performing efficiently and meeting its commitments,” said Lt Col Todd Caldwell, the U.S. Air Force’s GPS III program manager.
Successfully powering on GPS III SV-1 demonstrates mechanical integration, validates the satellite’s interfaces and leads the way for electrical and integrated hardware-software testing.  The satellite will complete its Assembly, Integration and Test (AI&T) in Lockheed Martin’s new GPS Processing Facility (GPF) designed for efficient and affordable satellite production. Like in aircraft or automobile manufacturing, each GPS III satellite will move through sequential work stations for various AI&T operations, culminating with shipment to the launch site.
“Turning power on to the first GPS III satellite is a major milestone for the team,” said Keoki Jackson, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Navigation Systems mission area. “The successful integration of the first satellite’s system module follows on the heels of our pathfinder GPS III Non-Flight Satellite Testbed (GNST), and demonstrates the great value of the investments made by the Air Force to implement low-risk spacecraft acquisition.  In this challenging budget environment, we are focused on delivering the critical GPS III capabilities to users affordably and on schedule.”
Lockheed Martin is currently under contract for production of the first four GPS III satellites, and advanced procurement funding of long-lead components for the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth satellites. The Air Force plans to purchase up to 32 GPS III satellites.
The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the GPS III prime contractor with teammates ITT Exelis, General Dynamics, Infinity Systems Engineering, Honeywell, ATK and other subcontractors. Air Force Space Command's 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colo., manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.
Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 120,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products, and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.

Media Contact: 

Michael Friedman
303-971-7255
[email protected]

Online russianhalo117

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #3 on: 05/03/2013 05:16 PM »
A question might be off topic: are there any additional payloads (except the navigation payload) on GPS satellites? As they have more than three or four times mass compared to peers of Galileo satellites, which are only about 800kg heavy.
BTW GPS-III programme is first to use unpressurized SM for GPS III sat.

Answers to your questions can be found here: http://www.losangeles.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=18830

and here: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/products/gps.html

Offline grythumn

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #4 on: 05/16/2013 09:34 PM »
A question might be off topic: are there any additional payloads (except the navigation payload) on GPS satellites? As they have more than three or four times mass compared to peers of Galileo satellites, which are only about 800kg heavy.

GPS III birds have about 10 times the power budget, for one thing. 15kw, vs 1.6 kw for the first gen galileo FOC birds. Some of that is for the new spot beams[0]. The design life is somewhat higher, which also implies slightly larger prop reserves. I think they also carry updated NDS (nuclear detonation detection system) payloads, although it isn't mentioned in those other links:

http://scpnt.stanford.edu/pnt/PNT12/2012_presentation_files/14-Jackson_presentation.pdf

-R C
[0] IIRC, the spot beam also involves an extra modulator / transmitter chain; they'll actually appear as a second satellite in the same location when activated, with +20db signal levels.

Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #5 on: 05/16/2013 09:49 PM »

BTW GPS-III programme is first to use unpressurized SM for GPS III sat.


SM?

Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #6 on: 05/31/2013 07:08 PM »
This launch has been continually deferred to May of 2015 because of the ground segment support issues.

As can be found in the recent GAO report (P. 72, http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-294SP).
Air Force officials recently stated that, although GPS III is still maintaining an April 2014 “available for launch” date for the first satellite, the planned launch date is being moved to May 2015 in order to synchronize it with the availability of the GPS Operational Control Segment (OCX) Block 0, without which the satellites cannot be launched and checked out.”
« Last Edit: 05/31/2013 07:09 PM by beidou »

Offline jcm

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #7 on: 06/01/2013 11:25 AM »

BTW GPS-III programme is first to use unpressurized SM for GPS III sat.


SM?

I think they mean 'service module', i.e. satellite bus
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Offline Skyrocket

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #8 on: 06/01/2013 12:04 PM »

BTW GPS-III programme is first to use unpressurized SM for GPS III sat.


SM?

I think they mean 'service module', i.e. satellite bus

But this does not make sense, as all GPS satellites used an unpressurized bus, which has been the standard in western satellite building since several decades.

Offline baldusi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #9 on: 06/01/2013 11:37 PM »
BTW GPS-III programme is first to use unpressurized SM for GPS III sat.
May be you are confusing with Uragan-K?

Offline macpacheco

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #10 on: 12/29/2013 11:23 AM »
I predict this mission will slip 2 to 3 years.
Just a normal, usual pattern for GPS launches.
2013 should have been 3 launches, a single one was performed instead.
2014 will have no more than 2.
IIIA-1 shouldn't be launched until IIF-9 is operational.
Source:
 Comparison between official GPS launch schedule and actual launches performed.
 Assuming IIF-5 doesn't slip further, in the past 60 months prior to Feb 2014 just 7 launches (including IIF-5) will have been done about once every 10 months

I'm posting this here so we can compare notes in 2017 when the minimum 24 month slippage prediction ends.
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Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #11 on: 12/29/2013 12:07 PM »
IIIA-1 shouldn't be launched until IIF-9 is operational.

That isn't a valid statement.

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #12 on: 12/29/2013 02:58 PM »
Sounds like the debate of using the oldest inventory first vs. the customer wanting the newest inventory. Hence reaching behind the milk carton in the front of the dairy case for a newer carton in the back.

So Jim are you arguing that they might launch it out of sequence so they can bring it on line early to give themselves extra time to make adjustments to future IIIA's if lessons are learned?
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Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #13 on: 12/29/2013 03:23 PM »
Sounds like the debate of using the oldest inventory first vs. the customer wanting the newest inventory. Hence reaching behind the milk carton in the front of the dairy case for a newer carton in the back.

So Jim are you arguing that they might launch it out of sequence so they can bring it on line early to give themselves extra time to make adjustments to future IIIA's if lessons are learned?

Not say they will or a reason why, just that they have in the past, for GPS and other spacecraft

Offline macpacheco

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #14 on: 12/30/2013 03:14 PM »
Sounds like the debate of using the oldest inventory first vs. the customer wanting the newest inventory. Hence reaching behind the milk carton in the front of the dairy case for a newer carton in the back.

So Jim are you arguing that they might launch it out of sequence so they can bring it on line early to give themselves extra time to make adjustments to future IIIA's if lessons are learned?

Not say they will or a reason why, just that they have in the past, for GPS and other spacecraft

IIIA birds require the new OCX control system to join the constellation in healthy mode (usable by users without specially configured receivers that allow for usage of signals flagged as unhealthy).
OCX stage 0 allows for IIIA Launch and early orbit, Anomaly resolution, and Disposal Operations (LADO), this stage operates as a standalone system, without taking over AEP
OCX stage 1 allows for controlling the GPS constellation replacing the current AEP architecture (controlling all GPS birds)
But OCX stage 1 can't operate GPS IIA satellites, my assumption of IIIA-1 launched right after IIF-9 would require early retirement of then 3 remaining healthy IIA birds, which are ok based of published GPS specs.
This in itself would be a compromise. Might even get some users in the civilian side of things upset. Plus all IIA's with any capabilities wouldn't be candidates for reactivation anymore (28 total then compared to today with about 36 birds between healthy and residuals).
In order to maintain what's considered the usual minimum of 30 healthy birds, IIF-1 ... IIF-11 would need to be operational instead.
There were some talk about a workaround to enable IIA birds to operate under OCX stage 1, but I haven't seen anything published about it (although I study this GPS stuff in depth, I'm just an outsider, there could be unpublished news that change this prediction).
And that assumes no further OCX delays, if OCX stage 0 isn't ready, IIIA-1 launch can't proceed as well.

It's useful to notice that if 2003 schedules were met, right now all IIF birds would be operational plus 6 to 8 IIIA's. GPS launch delays are the norm. In case you haven't noticed already.

Finally, with another 6 GPS satellites operational (IIF-5 ... IIF-9 + IIIA) the constellation will be in so great shape, there will be no constellation sustainment need to launch more GPS birds in a while. As it is right now, the GPS constellation is performing a little better every year. The main reason for an early IIIA launch would be to help LM get orders for more GPS III satellites so they end up in storage...

If congress would fund the FAA properly, they could mandate that the FAA paid for some of those launches, since they're the single most interested party in North America to have all IIF and all planned IIIA launched ASAP, but congress keep cutting and cutting and cutting their budget. NextGen air traffic control is heavily dependent on GPS and have a few upgrades / retirements (worth a billion USD yearly in savings) pending until L5 is FOC (all IIF launches + 12 GPS III required).
« Last Edit: 12/31/2013 08:02 AM by macpacheco »
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Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #15 on: 03/06/2014 07:36 PM »
There has been a significant delay of GPS III procurement, as reported by InsideGNSS (http://www.insidegnss.com/node/3922)

"The delivery of first GPS III satellite will slip to fiscal year 2016, McMurry said."

This means the launch of GPS IIIA-1 will eventually slip into 2016.
« Last Edit: 03/06/2014 07:36 PM by beidou »

Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #16 on: 10/30/2014 06:39 AM »
This has been deferred to December 2016.

Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #17 on: 11/19/2014 05:53 PM »
Quote
First GPS III Launch Slips to FY17
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4270

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #18 on: 10/09/2015 02:10 AM »
A cross-post from the GPS IIF-12 thread:
http://www.patrick.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123460438

by Chrissy Cuttita
45th Space Wing Public Affairs

10/8/2015 - PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- The last Air Force GPS IIF in a block of 12 satellites was delivered to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, from Boeing's manufacturing facility in El Segundo, California Oct. 8 via a C-17 Globemaster III.

<snip>

"This GPS IIF-12 satellite represents the end of a legacy as it will be the last of the 61 GPS satellites processed here at CCAFS," said Brig. Gen. Wayne Monteith, 45th Space Wing commander. "This culminates an incredible 27-year legacy at our Area 59 Satellite Processing Facility.  We are the Nation's premier gateway to space and are humbled to be a part of the team that provides GPS and its capabilities to the world."

<snip>

Where will the GPS IIIA and B satellites be processed before launch from the Cape?
« Last Edit: 10/09/2015 03:11 AM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-1 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #19 on: 10/09/2015 12:52 PM »
Astrotech or Spacex facilities
« Last Edit: 10/09/2015 12:53 PM by Jim »

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