Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon Heavy : STP-2 : LC-39A : H1-2019?  (Read 210805 times)

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3882
  • US
  • Liked: 3252
  • Likes Given: 1903
Planetary Society: Ground finale? Deployment test moves LightSail 2 closer to handoff
Quote
The Planetary Society's LightSail 2 spacecraft completed what may have been its final end-to-end systems test today here at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo...
LightSail 2 is nearly ready to be integrated with its P-POD, the spring-loaded box that will carry it to space. After integration takes place, the loaded P-POD will be shipped to the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Shipping may occur in January. At AFRL, LightSail's P-POD will be installed inside Prox-1, a Georgia Tech-built SmallSat that will hitch a ride to orbit aboard the second flight of SpaceX's new Falcon Heavy rocket.

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3882
  • US
  • Liked: 3252
  • Likes Given: 1903
https://mobile.twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/824371954559836160
Quote
In talk on COSMIC-2, NOAA says Falcon Heavy demo launch scheduled for 2nd Q; STP-2 mission (with COSMIC-2) planned for Sept. 30. #AMS2017

Offline butters

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1773
  • Liked: 397
  • Likes Given: 145
Is this mission still okay following the last-minute issues with the 2017 authorization bill?

It seemed that the STP program was flagged as one of the concerns for the WH/DOJ?

Online tater

  • Member
  • Posts: 47
  • NM
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 62
https://mobile.twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/824371954559836160
Quote
In talk on COSMIC-2, NOAA says Falcon Heavy demo launch scheduled for 2nd Q; STP-2 mission (with COSMIC-2) planned for Sept. 30. #AMS2017

Where would they launch it when they have no pad ready for it?

Offline Jim_LAX

  • Member
  • Posts: 77
  • California
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 364
Quote from Shotwell at Satelite 2017 on March 8th:
Cape Canaveralís Space Launch Complex-40 should be operational again this summer.
"I don't go along with going to the Moon first in order to build a launch pad to go to Mars.  We should go to Mars from Earth orbit."

Offline woods170

  • IRAS fan
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8595
  • IRAS fan
  • The Netherlands
  • Liked: 5219
  • Likes Given: 1672
Quote from Shotwell at Satelite 2017 on March 8th:
Cape Canaveralís Space Launch Complex-40 should be operational again this summer.
August was publically mentioned by SpaceX. After that, SpaceX will need at least 60 days to modify the current LC-39A reaction frame to host the additional TSM's and holddown posts needed for FH. That period is also from public SpaceX statements.
So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, it will be NET november 2017 for first FH launch attempt.
But that is assuming that the notorious SpaceX time dilation factor does not rear it's ugly head. If it does (like it almost always does) we could be looking at first FH launch attempt somewhere in Q1 of 2018.
« Last Edit: 03/11/2017 02:50 PM by woods170 »

Offline DOCinCT

Quote from Shotwell at Satelite 2017 on March 8th:
Cape Canaveralís Space Launch Complex-40 should be operational again this summer.
....After that, SpaceX will need at least 60 days to modify the current LC-39A reaction frame to host the additional TSM's and holddown posts needed for FH. That period is also from public SpaceX statements.
So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, ....
Do you have some references for that statement?

Offline old_sellsword

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 632
  • Liked: 531
  • Likes Given: 463
Quote from Shotwell at Satelite 2017 on March 8th:
Cape Canaveralís Space Launch Complex-40 should be operational again this summer.
....After that, SpaceX will need at least 60 days to modify the current LC-39A reaction frame to host the additional TSM's and holddown posts needed for FH. That period is also from public SpaceX statements.
So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, ....
Do you have some references for that statement?

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/03/spacex-falcon-9-echostar-23-slc-40-return/

Quote from: Chris Bergin
It was also noted that SpaceX is working a plan that involves returning operations to SLC-40 before then working on 39A to prepare it for the maiden launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket.

This work will take ďat least 60 daysĒ to complete, focusing on the 39A TEL table Ė which is currently specific to the single core Falcon 9 Ė and Tail Service Masts (TSM).

Offline Pete

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Cubicle
  • Liked: 199
  • Likes Given: 115
...So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, it will be NET november 2018 for first FH launch attempt.
But that is assuming that the notorious SpaceX time dilation factor does not rear it's ugly head.
...
One would have to look hard to find a time dilation factor as bad as yours.
"this August" + 60 days == NET November 2018?

Online ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7543
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1753
  • Likes Given: 393
...So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, it will be NET november 2018 for first FH launch attempt.
But that is assuming that the notorious SpaceX time dilation factor does not rear it's ugly head.
...
One would have to look hard to find a time dilation factor as bad as yours.
"this August" + 60 days == NET November 2018?

Well, he did get the year right at least...

Offline woods170

  • IRAS fan
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8595
  • IRAS fan
  • The Netherlands
  • Liked: 5219
  • Likes Given: 1672
...So, assuming LC-40 is back in action this August, and assuming the 60-day modification period goes off without a hitch, it will be NET november 2018 for first FH launch attempt.
But that is assuming that the notorious SpaceX time dilation factor does not rear it's ugly head.
...
One would have to look hard to find a time dilation factor as bad as yours.
"this August" + 60 days == NET November 2018?
Good catch. Corrected in the original post. And thanks for pointing out.

Offline sdsds

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5479
  • "With peace and hope for all mankind."
  • Seattle
  • Liked: 581
  • Likes Given: 677
Although the launcher isn't explicitly mentioned, this article belongs here. (Yes?)

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6784

Last month, the space agency's next-generation atomic clock was joined to the spacecraft that will take it into orbit in late 2017.

That instrument, the Deep Space Atomic Clock was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. On Feb. 17, JPL engineers monitored integration of the clock on to the Surrey Orbital Test Bed spacecraft at Surrey Satellite Technology in Englewood, Colorado.
« Last Edit: 03/21/2017 07:44 PM by sdsds »
-- sdsds --

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3882
  • US
  • Liked: 3252
  • Likes Given: 1903
A recent presentation on the Cosmic-2 payload by Wei Xia-Serafino/NOAA.  PDF file is attached below.  There is an updated graphic of the STP-2 payload stack, and much information/pictures on Cosmic-2 of course.

Offline Formica

  • Rocket Boi
  • Member
  • Posts: 70
  • Richmond, CA
  • Liked: 61
  • Likes Given: 434
What is the purpose of the 5 tonnes of ballast on this mission? Is it simply to ensure that FH is capable of meeting the EELV New Entrant specifications?
I'm just a space fan, please correct me if I'm wrong!

Offline woods170

  • IRAS fan
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8595
  • IRAS fan
  • The Netherlands
  • Liked: 5219
  • Likes Given: 1672
What is the purpose of the 5 tonnes of ballast on this mission? Is it simply to ensure that FH is capable of meeting the EELV New Entrant specifications?
No. The launcher is too powerfull for just the payload alone. It requires additional payload mass (provided by means of ballast) to prevent over-performance.

Offline Pete

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Cubicle
  • Liked: 199
  • Likes Given: 115
About the date for this mission, it reminds me of a movie .

"Mission Impossible"?  no, that's not it
.
"Back to the Future"?  closer
.
"Days of our Lives"? almost
.
I have it.. Annie, singing "Tomorrow, Tomorrow, i love ya, your only a day away"



Offline vaporcobra

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1143
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Liked: 2046
  • Likes Given: 2390
Potentially great news. STP-2 is NET April 30th, 2018, according to the USAF.
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2017/20170721-lightsail-2-updates-prox-1-launch-dates.html

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9708
  • UK
  • Liked: 1850
  • Likes Given: 183
That date appears again in this tweet from Jeff Foust showing a chart of educational nanosatellites missions.

https://mobile.twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/894608571186388992
« Last Edit: 08/07/2017 07:00 PM by Star One »

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3882
  • US
  • Liked: 3252
  • Likes Given: 1903
I'm not going to believe any dates on this one yet, let's see how the first couple flights go.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9708
  • UK
  • Liked: 1850
  • Likes Given: 183
I'm not going to believe any dates on this one yet, let's see how the first couple flights go.

Isn't this the second FH flight.

Tags: