Author Topic: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Rover ENTRY, DESCENT, LANDING - Aug 5-6, 2012  (Read 219297 times)

Offline haywoodfloyd

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 363
  • Ottawa, Ontario CANADA
  • Liked: 12
  • Likes Given: 1
Congrats to the MSL Team. Well done!!!
I understand they've already snapped a few photo's too.


Great! Now where is the Iludium Q-36 explosive space modulator?

Online Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7126
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 646
  • Likes Given: 759
Congrats to the MSL Team. Well done!!!
I understand they've already snapped a few photo's too.


Great! Now where is the Iludium Q-36 explosive space modulator?


That's their name for the RTG. ;)
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline briguy700

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 91
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Congrats to the WHOLE MSL team on this amazing achievement !! I will be the first to admit that I felt the whole "sky crane" concept was too complicated and would end up in a crash. Never been happier to be wrong or eat crow. Well done !! I'll never doubt you guys again !! You rock !! Looking forward to all the amazing images and data to come from Curiosity !!
"The greatest failure is in not even trying."

Offline JimO

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1869
  • Texas, USA
  • Liked: 308
  • Likes Given: 74
  It proves that even the longest of odds are no match for our unique blend of ingenuity and determination. 

I heard Holdren say much the same thing last night, 'gutsy determination' overcoming 'long odds', with skill.

I'm not sure they understand what 'long odds' means.

In the 1990s, NASA was directed to use determination and sincerity to make difficult missions easier. It was one disaster after another.

You use insight and intelligence to REDUCE the long odds to much BETTER odds, and then when you launch, the odds are on your side, not AGAINST you.

You 'stack the deck' and 'load the dice'. You do NOT wish hard, cross your fingers, squeeze your eyes shut, and jump. Or if you do, you will fail, and you will deserve it.

I'm probably over sensitive to this loose wording, since I've been up close and very, VERY personal to the hideous costs of relying on enthusiasm and self esteem to overcome Mother Nature.

So I'll just shrug it off as meaningless political phrase-making, which is not inappropriate at this joyous time. And I'll jump up and down and wear a silly hat, for a proper celebratory interval, as the success warrents.


Offline Space Pete

New images coming down from Curiosity! :)
NASASpaceflight ISS Editor

Offline Herb Schaltegger

  It proves that even the longest of odds are no match for our unique blend of ingenuity and determination. 

I heard Holdren say much the same thing last night, 'gutsy determination' overcoming 'long odds', with skill.

I'm not sure they understand what 'long odds' means.

In the 1990s, NASA was directed to use determination and sincerity to make difficult missions easier. It was one disaster after another.

You use insight and intelligence to REDUCE the long odds to much BETTER odds, and then when you launch, the odds are on your side, not AGAINST you.

You 'stack the deck' and 'load the dice'. You do NOT wish hard, cross your fingers, squeeze your eyes shut, and jump. Or if you do, you will fail, and you will deserve it.

I'm probably over sensitive to this loose wording, since I've been up close and very, VERY personal to the hideous costs of relying on enthusiasm and self esteem to overcome Mother Nature.

So I'll just shrug it off as meaningless political phrase-making, which is not inappropriate at this joyous time. And I'll jump up and down and wear a silly hat, for a proper celebratory interval, as the success warrents.



Ah, yes, "Better, Faster, Cheaper" . . . Pick any two.  :-\

And I'd dearly love to see pics of you wearing the silly hat, JimO.  ;D
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Offline Chris Bergin

United Launch Alliance Congratulates NASA on Flawless Mars Landing

 

ULA’s Atlas V Successfully Launched Mars Science Lab November 2011

 

Centennial, Colo., (Aug. 6, 2012) – United Launch Alliance (ULA) congratulates NASA on the flawless landing of the Mars Science Lab (MSL) on the surface of Mars after a nearly nine-month journey to the red planet.

"ULA applauds NASA’s MSL team on the remarkable technical achievements witnessed today as MSL touched down to begin its science mission on the Martian surface,” said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Mission Operations. “We could not be more proud of our role in safely and accurately delivering MSL and the Curiosity rover to orbit and look forward to the tremendous science that Curiosity will collect along with the yet unknown discoveries it will make.”

            Officials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., had prepared for a possible course-correction maneuver 15 days after launch, but navigators determined the trajectory was spot-on and did not need the maneuver.

            "This was among the most accurate interplanetary injections ever," said Louis D'Amario, mission design and navigation manager for Mars Science Lab during an interview in December 2011.

In celebration of MSL’s landing, ULA hosted an event for 300 school-age children where future rocket scientists conducted simulated launch countdowns and MSL mission landings to learn about the importance of this science mission, as well as to generate excitement about pursuing science, technology and engineering careers.

The MSL mission was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida Nov. 26, 2011 aboard an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Atlas V 541 configuration vehicle, which includes a 5-meter diameter RUAG Space payload fairing along with four Aerojet solid rocket motors attached to the Atlas booster. The Atlas booster was powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 engine and the Centaur upper stage was powered by a single Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL10A engine.

“This was an impressive launch on the Atlas V,” said Amanda Mitskevich, program manager of NASA’s Launch Services Program. “The teamwork between NASA’s Launch Services Program, ULA and JPL made for an almost seamless integration and perfect launch of this historic mission."

Developed by the United States Air Force to provide assured access to space for Department of Defense and other government payloads, the commercially developed EELV Program supports the full range of government mission requirements, while delivering on schedule and providing significant cost savings over the heritage launch systems. 

ULA's next launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida is the Atlas V Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission for NASA scheduled August 23 from Space Launch Complex-41.


Offline Chris Bergin

(link: http://www.commercialspaceflight.org/?p=3285)


Commercial Spaceflight Federation Congratulates the Mars Science Laboratory Team


Washington D.C. - The Commercial Spaceflight Federation applauds the team of explorers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, industry, and throughout NASA, that has successfully delivered the Curiosity rover to the surface of Mars. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landed on the Martian surface at 1:31AM ET today after launching from Cape Canaveral in November.

“Curiosity is NASA’s next great explorer, a technological wonder that will bring Mars into laboratories and living rooms across the country,” said Michael Lopez-Alegria, President of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “Thousands of people designed, developed, built and delivered Curiosity, and they all deserve our acclaim. Congratulations, in particular, to the scientists and engineers of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who have led their team to such an inspiring achievement.”

Many CSF companies were involved in the successful delivery of MSL to Mars. Back in November, MSL began its journey atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Sierra Nevada Corporation and Aerojet worked on key components of the rover such as the descent brake and descent engines, respectively, among others. And Planetary Resources was a JPL contractor that assisted with various aspects of the MSL program.


Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2580
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
« Last Edit: 08/06/2012 03:34 PM by racshot65 »

Offline jcopella

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 280
  • Orlando, FL
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 7
Oh my.
"I don't think the country is really going to realize what a good deal that we had in the space shuttle until we don't have it anymore." -- Wayne Hale

Offline StephenB

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 282
  • Liked: 17
  • Likes Given: 200
WOW.  :o
Wow indeed. I didn't expect the image to be that good.

Offline robertross

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17803
  • Westphal, Nova Scotia
  • Liked: 462
  • Likes Given: 4208
Nathan Moeller has just tweeted this:

https://twitter.com/AstroN8/status/232496228464750592/photo/1/large


WOW.  :o

Right on Nathan!!

What an image! Beat us all to the punch
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline Herb Schaltegger

Nathan Moeller has just tweeted this:

https://twitter.com/AstroN8/status/232496228464750592/photo/1/large


WOW.  :o

That's pretty freaking amazing right there, on so many levels.
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1996
  • Liked: 170
  • Likes Given: 0
Excellent pic, simply awesome!

Offline iamlucky13

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1660
  • Liked: 102
  • Likes Given: 93

Doesn't look like pyros to me.

If pyros look like pyros, they're probably oversized. The animation clearly shows a spring on the cover, but it was likely restrained by some sort of catch severed by a pyro. It could alternatively have been solenoid released like a pop-up flash on a camera, but usually a pyro is the lightest, simplest, and most reliable way. It could be as simple as thin wire coated in a little bit of powder that creates enough gas pressure to push a pin out of a slot or burns through a severable link.

Sorry for being late, but could anybody link me to info about the rover I'm particularly interested about how it is being powered.

There's a really good 2 page (PDF) description of the RTG here:
http://www.ne.doe.gov/pdfFiles/MMRTG_Jan2008.pdf

The RTG charges a small set of batteries that give engineers more flexibility in using the energy generated, similar to a hybrid car.

Offline iamlucky13

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1660
  • Liked: 102
  • Likes Given: 93
Nathan Moeller has just tweeted this:

https://twitter.com/AstroN8/status/232496228464750592/photo/1/large


WOW.  :o

Stunning!

By which I mean, it's stunning nobody wrote "Hi Mom" or anything like that on the parachute before packaging it. :D

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8652
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1123
  • Likes Given: 243
I am so hopping that pic is real... Incredible if it is!
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7526
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1746
  • Likes Given: 384
It is real, but apparently it was leaked prior to the press conference.

Offline Carreidas 160

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 170
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 0
I am so hopping that pic is real... Incredible if it is!

Seems real enough.

« Last Edit: 08/06/2012 04:36 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline Herb Schaltegger

It's real. The official MSL Twitter account just tweeted it a few minutes ago too.
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Tags: