Author Topic: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread  (Read 214474 times)

Online eeergo


Offline Lar

  • Fan boy at large
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11356
  • Saw Gemini live on TV
  • A large LEGO storage facility ... in Michigan
  • Liked: 8400
  • Likes Given: 6728
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #901 on: 12/20/2018 02:23 pm »
In the coming days, the InSight team will work on leveling the seismometer, which is sitting on ground that is tilted 2 to 3 degrees. The first seismometer science data should begin to flow back to Earth after the seismometer is in the right position.

How will they level the seismometer? Pick it up a little and jiggle it? Scrape sand away on the high side first (or only)?
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Online eeergo

Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #902 on: 12/20/2018 02:34 pm »
In the coming days, the InSight team will work on leveling the seismometer, which is sitting on ground that is tilted 2 to 3 degrees. The first seismometer science data should begin to flow back to Earth after the seismometer is in the right position.

How will they level the seismometer? Pick it up a little and jiggle it? Scrape sand away on the high side first (or only)?

It has motorized leveling legs that will level its base horizontal. They will also minimize thermal contact with the ground (which would otherwise constitute an important source of noise, remember SEIS is sensitive enough to detect jiggles smaller than an atom!) and ease the instrument settling on the porous ground.
-DaviD-

Offline marshallsplace

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 708
  • UK
    • music website
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #903 on: 02/02/2019 08:16 pm »
Hope this is OK to post. I've used an InSight NASA sound download to create an electronic composition.  The thing is, the vibrations recorded were very low frequency - almost inaudible with our human hearing range - but the recordings from the InSight seismometer contain so much complex waveforms and audio information you can make almost any sound with them!

An example is here: https://soundcloud.com/gjmarshall/marsinsight

Inspired by Mars and NASA InSight


Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2210
  • Liked: 330
  • Likes Given: 404
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #904 on: 02/03/2019 10:30 pm »
Can the seismometer gather local stratigraphic information from the activities of the mole?
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2642
  • Canada
  • Liked: 430
  • Likes Given: 649
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #905 on: 02/04/2019 01:18 am »
A layman's question. Does the operation of the mole degraded the performance of the seismometer since the mole is operating so nearby?

Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2210
  • Liked: 330
  • Likes Given: 404
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #906 on: 02/04/2019 01:49 am »
A layman's question. Does the operation of the mole degraded the performance of the seismometer since the mole is operating so nearby?

It  would while it is operating, it would create a lot of noise.  However the signal may be processed to yield other information,hence my question.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Online Johnnyhinbos

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1792
  • Boston, MA
  • Liked: 2645
  • Likes Given: 328
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #907 on: 02/04/2019 02:47 am »
I would expect that the fact that these two payloads are both on the lander would yield your answer...
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Offline hop

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3352
  • Liked: 484
  • Likes Given: 842
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #908 on: 02/04/2019 04:56 am »
I would expect that the fact that these two payloads are both on the lander would yield your answer...
I don't think it does answer the question. The hammering is just a byproduct of the engineering solution chosen to deploy HP3 to the required depth. If SEIS can get some information from it, that's a cool bonus, but it certainly isn't the reason the two instruments were flown together. 

From a draft version of https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-018-0512-7 (available from https://elib.dlr.de/121299/2/SPAC-D-18-00006_R1_1.pdf) (edit: published version available from https://authors.library.caltech.edu/87854/)
Quote
2.5. HP3 – SEIS Hammering Investigation
The hammering of the HP3 mole into the ground to 5 m depth to measure a vertical thermal conductivity profile will generate seismic signals that provide a unique opportunity to investigate the shallow martian subsurface (meters to possibly few tens of meters) using seismic-exploration techniques (Kedar et al. 2017). It is expected that the mole will require several thousand strikes to reach 3-5 m depth and each strike will generate a seismic signal. An adapted seismic-data sampling strategy to increase the recorded frequency bandwidth (e.g., Lognonné et al. 2018) will enhance the data analysis such that the signals can be used in a manner similar to high-resolution active seismic experiments conducted with sledgehammers for terrestrial engineering and environmental applications (e.g., Schmelzbach et al. 2005). The near-surface elastic properties can be derived from measurements of P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation, Q, and will be used to reduce travel-time and amplitude errors of globally propagating seismic waves as well as help test hypotheses on the shallow structure of the landing site.

As far as interference with SEIS primary mission goes, the cadence of the HP3 deployment is pretty low: https://www.seis-insight.eu/en/public-2/the-insight-mission/other-instruments states that it will wait 48 hours every 50 cm, and this LPSC abstract https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2014/pdf/1325.pdf states that the individual hammer strokes are 3 sec apart.
« Last Edit: 02/04/2019 06:10 am by hop »

Offline mcgyver

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 546
  • milan, rome
  • Liked: 153
  • Likes Given: 111
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #909 on: 02/12/2019 02:55 pm »
Ok let's see how many conspiracy UFO theories will be started by this picture!  ;D ;D

Offline redliox

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1996
  • Arizona USA
  • Liked: 409
  • Likes Given: 67
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #910 on: 02/12/2019 11:18 pm »
SEIS now has company via the HP3.

They moved it surprisingly fast.  Would that be because of practiced moves or motivated to rush by fear of (the American) government shutdown again?
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Offline redliox

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1996
  • Arizona USA
  • Liked: 409
  • Likes Given: 67
Re: The InSight Mission to Mars Master Thread
« Reply #911 on: 02/13/2019 03:22 am »
There's a chance that, when InSight detects Marsquakes, some Marsquakes might come from the South Pole and its underwater lakes.  A study suggests even brine water might need extra heat to be liquid on Mars, and it is implied magma might be moving around.

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL080985
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Tags: InSight Mars magma