Author Topic: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel  (Read 6482 times)

Online douglas100

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #20 on: 12/16/2011 03:39 PM »

If one really wanted to use methane as a combustion engine fuel, why not get it directly from the lakes rather than the atmosphere?

Where would you get the oxygen from?
Douglas Clark

Offline 8900

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #21 on: 12/17/2011 06:22 AM »

If one really wanted to use methane as a combustion engine fuel, why not get it directly from the lakes rather than the atmosphere?

Where would you get the oxygen from?
haven't you even bother to read the post? Oxygen will be carried on board the vehicle like vehicles on Earth carrying gasoline on board, in the form of liquid oxygen. At the average temperature on Titan at 94K LOx will stay as liquid with minimal insulation needed

Offline 8900

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #22 on: 12/17/2011 06:25 AM »
I know some plastics harden and strengthen under UV. 

Are the types of hydrocarbons on titan suitable for making these types of plastics? 

If so, perhaps giant hydrocarbon stations at tether-tops above Titan could be the "gas stations" of the distant future: Fueling huge, plastic-hulled exploration vehicles and tanker fleets for operations in the solar system. 
to the best of my knowledge, making hydrocarbon polymer requires unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. On Earth these unsaturated hydrocarbons form from catalytic cracking of heavier longer chain hydrocarbon from crude oil. On Titan all hydrocarbon are "light", with 1-2C. I am not sure how can we make hydrocarbon polymer from those material. Maybe someone with better chemistry background can answer this ;)

Online douglas100

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #23 on: 12/17/2011 09:01 AM »

haven't you even bother to read the post? Oxygen will be carried on board the vehicle like vehicles on Earth carrying gasoline on board, in the form of liquid oxygen. At the average temperature on Titan at 94K LOx will stay as liquid with minimal insulation needed
[/quote]

And where in the post do you actually say that the oxygen is to be brought from Earth?
Douglas Clark

Offline mmeijeri

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #24 on: 12/17/2011 09:26 AM »
On Titan all hydrocarbon are "light", with 1-2C. I am not sure how can we make hydrocarbon polymer from those material.

You can synthesise higher hydrocarbons using a Gas To Liquids process. This is how the synthetic component of Shell V Power is made. Since it is too expensive to use neat it is blended with ordinary refined diesel.
We will be vic-toooooo-ri-ous!!!

Offline 8900

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #25 on: 12/17/2011 12:23 PM »

haven't you even bother to read the post? Oxygen will be carried on board the vehicle like vehicles on Earth carrying gasoline on board, in the form of liquid oxygen. At the average temperature on Titan at 94K LOx will stay as liquid with minimal insulation needed

And where in the post do you actually say that the oxygen is to be brought from Earth?
[/quote]
Post #1 Line 11
In a Titan vehicle, oxidizer (liquid O2) is stored in tank

Online douglas100

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Re: Titan ground/aerial vehicle burning atm. CH4 as fuel
« Reply #26 on: 12/18/2011 03:35 PM »
You didn't say brought from Earth. The word Earth does not appear. I believe you just assumed that anyone reading it would think that the oxygen was brought from Earth. I didn't. I didn't know if you were assuming the oxygen was produced in situ by some kind of ISRU process. That's why I asked the question. If you had just replied "from Earth" I would have said thanks. But you accused me of not bothering to read your post properly. That was rude and unnecessary.
Douglas Clark

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