Author Topic: NASA - MSL Updates  (Read 83227 times)

Offline Jim

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #160 on: 07/28/2012 01:19 PM »
Are there any plans for Curiosity to investigate the SkyCrane crash site? Might be interesting to see what happened to it, plus the skly crane will dig up some soil from the impact, revealing material underneath the top soil. Might be of scientific interest?

Greets, Chris

You mean descent stage

Offline Bogeyman

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #161 on: 07/29/2012 06:58 AM »
Quote from: Jim link=topic=27414.msg934456#msg934456

You mean descent stage
[/quote

Well, the part that lets Curiosity down on the cables and then flies away as soon it has disconnected. "Descent stage" or "Skycrane"... same thing?

Offline Jim

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #162 on: 07/29/2012 11:45 AM »
Quote from: Jim link=topic=27414.msg934456#msg934456


You mean descent stage

Well, the part that lets Curiosity down on the cables and then flies away as soon it has disconnected. "Descent stage" or "Skycrane"... same thing?

Skycrane is a technique and descent stage is the hardware
« Last Edit: 07/30/2012 11:23 PM by Jim »

Offline Norm38

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #163 on: 07/30/2012 09:32 PM »
Per JPL, 7/29:
Quote
Course Maneuver Successful; MSL Begins Final Approach
Late Saturday night, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft successfully fine-tuned its course to better zero in on its target entry point into the Martian atmosphere on landing day. Two brief thruster firings totaling about six seconds altered the spacecraft's velocity slightly, by about one-fortieth of one mile per hour (one centimeter per second). This trajectory correction maneuver the fourth since MSL's launch adjusted the point at which Curiosity will enter the Martian atmosphere by about 13 miles (21 kilometers). On landing day, MSL can steer enough during its flight through the upper atmosphere to correct for a miss of the target entry point by a few miles and still land within its target ellipse. Mission engineers and managers rated the projected 13-mile miss big enough to warrant a correction maneuver. Telemetry and tracking data indicate the maneuver was successful. MSL will have two further opportunities for additional course corrections during the final 48 hours before landing, if needed.
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1271

Thank God I'm too busy at work this week to obsess over this.  Sunday night can't come fast enough.

Offline Alpha Control

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #164 on: 07/30/2012 10:35 PM »
IIRC, they want to avoid the descent stage crash site due to contamination hazard to MSL instruments.

Couldn't they just approach it up to a safe point*, and then zoom in with the Mastcam? Would be quite interesting to see it.

*Perhaps no closer than 500 meters? Just a guess, as I don't know what a safe viewing distance would actually be.

edit: disregard the zoom comment. I found info recalling that the zoom capability was deleted, and only fixed focal length cameras are part of the Mastcam.
« Last Edit: 07/30/2012 10:40 PM by Alpha Control »
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Online jacqmans

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #165 on: 07/31/2012 06:35 AM »
News release: 2012-221b                                                                     July 30, 2012


NASA Announces News Activities for Mars Landing

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-221&cid=release_2012-221


PASADENA, Calif. The public is invited to tune in for a series of news briefings from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., for the upcoming landing of NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission will deliver the nearly 2,000-pound (1-ton), car-size robotic roving laboratory to the surface of Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT Aug. 5 (1:31 a.m. EDT Aug. 6). Curiosity's landing will mark the start of a two-year prime mission to investigate whether one of the most intriguing places on Mars ever has offered an environment favorable for microbial life.

News Briefing and Televised Event Schedule

News briefings will be held at JPL beginning Thursday, Aug. 2, and carried live on NASA Television. Additional events, including a NASA Social Media event Aug. 1 and landing commentary Aug. 5, will be televised. A full schedule of live news briefings is available at: http://www.nasa.gov/ntvnews and http://www.nasa.gov/msl .

The schedule of events below is subject to change. All times are PDT.

Thursday, Aug. 2

-- 10 a.m. - Mission Science Overview News Briefing

-- 11 a.m. - Mission Engineering Overview News Briefing

Friday, Aug. 3

-- 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. - NASA Social

Saturday, Aug. 4

-- 9:30 a.m. - Prelanding Update and Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

Overview News Briefing

Sunday, Aug. 5

-- 9:30 a.m. - Final Prelanding Update News Briefing

-- 3 p.m. - NASA Science News Briefing

-- 8:30 p.m. to about 11 p.m. - Landing Commentary No. 1

-- No earlier than 11:15 p.m. - Post-landing News Briefing

Monday, Aug. 6

-- 12:30 to 1:30 a.m. - Landing Commentary No. 2

-- 9 a.m. - Landing Recap News Briefing

-- 4 p.m. - Possible New Images News Briefing

Tuesday, Aug. 7

-- 10 a.m. - News Briefing

Wednesday, Aug. 8

-- 10 a.m. - News Briefing

Thursday, Aug. 9

-- 10 a.m. - News Briefing

Friday, Aug. 10

-- 10 a.m. (tentative) - News Briefing

For information on how to watch NASA TV, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv . The televised events will also be streamed live online at: http://www.Ustream.tv/nasa .

NASA Television Commentary Feeds

Two live feeds during key landing activities from mission control at JPL will be carried on NASA TV and on the Web from 8:30 to 11 p.m. PDT Aug. 5, and from 12:30 to 1:30 a.m. PDT Aug. 6. The NASA TV Public Channel and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl will carry a feed including commentary and interviews.

The NASA TV Media Channel and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 will carry an uninterrupted, clean feed with only mission audio.

Online Information

Extensive information on the Mars Science Laboratory mission, including an electronic copy of the press kit, news releases, fact sheets, status reports, briefing schedule and images, is available at: http://www.nasa.gov/msl .

For more information about NASA's Mars program, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars .

The public can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.


Offline TISM

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #166 on: 07/31/2012 08:01 AM »
Those times for Australians on the East coast  8):

Friday 3rd
3 am -- Mission Science Overview News Briefing
4 am -- Mission Engineering Overview News Briefing

Saturday 4th
2:30 am -- NASA Social

Sunday 5th
2:30 am -- Prelanding Update and Entry, Descent and Landing Overview

Monday 6th
2:30 am -- Final Prelanding Update News Briefing
8 am -- NASA Science News Briefing
1:30-4 pm -- Landing Commentary No. 1
~ 4:15 pm -- Post-landing News Briefing
5:30-6:30 pm -- Landing Commentary No. 2

Tuesday 7th
2 am -- Landing Recap News Briefing
9 am -- Possible New Images News Briefing

Wednesday 8th
3 am -- News Briefing

Thursday 9th
3 am -- News Briefing

Friday 10th
3 am -- News Briefing

Saturday 11th
3 am (tentative) -- News Briefing
« Last Edit: 07/31/2012 08:04 AM by TISM »

Offline racshot65

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #167 on: 07/31/2012 10:08 AM »
« Last Edit: 07/31/2012 10:08 AM by racshot65 »

Offline Paul Adams

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #168 on: 07/31/2012 10:12 AM »
Excellent program!
It's all in the data.

Offline Nathan

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #169 on: 07/31/2012 10:26 AM »
Those times for Australians on the East coast  8):

Friday 3rd
3 am -- Mission Science Overview News Briefing
4 am -- Mission Engineering Overview News Briefing

Saturday 4th
2:30 am -- NASA Social

Sunday 5th
2:30 am -- Prelanding Update and Entry, Descent and Landing Overview

Monday 6th
2:30 am -- Final Prelanding Update News Briefing
8 am -- NASA Science News Briefing
1:30-4 pm -- Landing Commentary No. 1
~ 4:15 pm -- Post-landing News Briefing
5:30-6:30 pm -- Landing Commentary No. 2

Tuesday 7th
2 am -- Landing Recap News Briefing
9 am -- Possible New Images News Briefing

Wednesday 8th
3 am -- News Briefing

Thursday 9th
3 am -- News Briefing

Friday 10th
3 am -- News Briefing

Saturday 11th
3 am (tentative) -- News Briefing

Thankyou so much!
Given finite cash, if we want to go to Mars then we should go to Mars.

Offline Retired Downrange

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #170 on: 07/31/2012 04:14 PM »

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #171 on: 07/31/2012 04:31 PM »
Horizon Mission to Mars (UK Only) -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01llnb2/Horizon_20122013_Mission_to_Mars/

Was hoping for a programme actually on the landing day but I suppose the Olympics coverage precludes that.

Offline jcopella

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #172 on: 08/02/2012 04:46 PM »
Not to take anything away from our excellent coverage here at NSF, but is anyone else having trouble reaching unmannedspaceflight.com?  Been down for me since last night, via two different broadband nets.
"I don't think the country is really going to realize what a good deal that we had in the space shuttle until we don't have it anymore." -- Wayne Hale

Online ugordan

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #173 on: 08/02/2012 04:51 PM »
Not to take anything away from our excellent coverage here at NSF, but is anyone else having trouble reaching unmannedspaceflight.com?  Been down for me since last night, via two different broadband nets.

Down for me too, most likely related to some IP-address change mentioned over there and DNS updating issues.

Online jacqmans

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #174 on: 08/02/2012 06:10 PM »
RELEASE: 12-264

NEWEST NASA MARS MISSION CONNECTS PAST AND FUTURE

WASHINGTON -- NASA's newest Mars mission, landing in three days, will
draw on support from missions sent to Mars years ago and will
contribute to missions envisioned for future decades.

"Curiosity is a bold step forward in learning about our neighboring
planet, but this mission does not stand alone. It is part of a
sustained, coordinated program of Mars exploration," said Doug
McCuistion, director of the Mars Exploration Program at NASA
Headquarters in Washington. "This mission transitions the program's
science emphasis from the planet's water history to its potential for
past or present life."

As the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft places the Curiosity rover
on the surface of Mars next week, NASA will be using the Mars Odyssey
orbiter, in service since 2001, as a relay for rapidly confirming the
landing to Curiosity's flight team and the rest of the world. Earth
will be below the Mars horizon from Curiosity's perspective, so the
new rover will not be in direct radio contact with Earth. Two newer
orbiters also will be recording Curiosity's transmissions, but that
data will not be available on Earth until hours later.

When Curiosity lands beside a mountain inside a crater at about 1:31
a.m. EDT, Aug. 6 (10:31 p.m. PDT Aug. 5), the 1-ton rover's two-year
prime mission on the surface of Mars will begin. However, one of the
rover's 10 science instruments, the Radiation Assessment Detector
(RAD), already has logged 221 days collecting data since the
spacecraft was launched on its trip to Mars on Nov. 26, 2011.

"Our observations already are being used in planning for human
missions," said Don Hassler of Southwest Research Institute in
Boulder, Colo., principal investigator for Curiosity's RAD.

The instrument recorded radiation spikes from five solar flare events
spewing energetic particles from the sun into interplanetary space.
Radiation from galactic cosmic rays, originating from supernova
explosions and other extremely distant events, accounted for more of
the total radiation experienced on the trip than the amount from
solar particle events. Inside the spacecraft, despite shielding
roughly equivalent to what surrounds astronauts on the International
Space Station, RAD recorded radiation amounting to a significant
contribution to a NASA astronaut's career-limit radiation dose.

Curiosity's main assignment is to investigate whether its study area
ever has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial
life. To do that, it packs a science payload weighing 15 times as
much as the science instruments on previous Mars rovers. The landing
target, an area about 12 miles by 4 miles (20 kilometers by 7
kilometers), sits in a safely flat area between less-safe slopes of
the rim of Gale Crater and the crater's central peak, informally
called Mount Sharp. The target was plotted to be within driving
distance of layers on Mount Sharp, where minerals that formed in
water have been seen from orbit.

"Some deposits right inside the landing area look as though they were
deposited by water, too," said John Grotzinger of the California
Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, project scientist for
Curiosity. "We have a great landing site that was a strong science
contender for earlier missions, but was not permitted for engineering
constraints because no earlier landing could be targeted precisely
enough to hit a safe area inside Gale Crater. The science team feels
very optimistic about exploration of Mount Sharp and the surrounding
region that includes the landing ellipse."

Mission engineers designed a sky crane maneuver, lowering Curiosity on
nylon cords from a rocket backpack because the rover is too heavy to
use the airbag system developed for earlier rovers. "We know it looks
crazy," said Adam Steltzner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
in Pasadena, leader of the team that developed the system. "It really
is the result of careful choices." By designing the aeroshell
enclosing Curiosity to create lift and be steerable, engineers were
able to build a system that lands much more precisely instead of
dropping like a rock.

JPL, a division of Caltech, manages the Mars Science Laboratory for
NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

For more information about the mission is available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/mars

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/

You can follow the mission on Facebook and on Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

Offline John44

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #175 on: 08/02/2012 06:43 PM »

Offline John44

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #176 on: 08/02/2012 07:36 PM »
NASA Science News Conference - Mission Engineering Overview
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7752

Offline racshot65

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #177 on: 08/03/2012 10:14 AM »
Relevant snippet from the MER update:

Quote
On Sol 3028 (July 31, 2012), Opportunity served as a trial horse for possible direct detection at Earth of Curiosity's Ultra High Frequency (UHF) signal during landing with the Parkes Radio Observatory in Australia. Opportunity transmitted a UHF signal configured as Curiosity's UHF will be at landing. The Parkes antenna was able to detect the Opportunity test signal and will be now be listening during Curiosity's landing.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status_opportunityAll.html#sol360

Offline racshot65

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #178 on: 08/04/2012 10:55 AM »
What to Expect When Curiosity Starts Snapping Pictures

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-226

Offline John44

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Re: NASA - MSL Updates
« Reply #179 on: 08/04/2012 06:12 PM »
NASA Social for the Mars Science Laboratory-Curiosity Rover Landing
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7754


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