Author Topic: Radiation sickness: possible treatment  (Read 1001 times)

Online docmordrid

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Radiation sickness: possible treatment
« on: 11/24/2011 04:13 AM »
I'm speechless....taking doses of both Cipro (a common  antibiotic) and BPI (a human infection-fighting protein) acts as a treatment for radiation sickness in mice, and they're an excellent human analog.

Just what human spaceflight needs.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-therapy-sickness.html
« Last Edit: 11/24/2011 04:15 AM by docmordrid »
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Offline aquanaut99

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Re: Radiation sickness: possible treatment
« Reply #1 on: 11/24/2011 04:33 AM »
I'm speechless....taking doses of both Cipro (a common  antibiotic) and BPI (a human infection-fighting protein) acts as a treatment for radiation sickness in mice, and they're an excellent human analog.

Just what human spaceflight needs.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-therapy-sickness.html

Let's not cry victory too quickly. As I understand it, this therapy would mainly fight the symptoms of radiation sickness (like vomiting, pettaciae and hair falling out) as well as the main cause of death in people who have absorbed 7 Gray or more: Collapse of the immune system.

I doubt it will be able to undo the organ and tissue damage caused by radiation tho. IE, you would still risk irreversible brain damage due to prolonged exposure to GCR on a Mars voyage even if you swallow these pills religiously.

Also, I don't think it will work against the elevated cancer risk.

Finally, just because it works in mice doesn't mean it works in humans. And testing this with humans is out of the question.
« Last Edit: 11/24/2011 04:34 AM by aquanaut99 »

Online docmordrid

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Re: Radiation sickness: possible treatment
« Reply #2 on: 11/24/2011 12:39 PM »
I completely agree and I'm "in the business" so I understand the issues, but those results are still impressive.

Yes this was in mice, but they are a good human analog. These drugs are also innocuous enough to try them on a few selected exposed humans - radiation therapy patients etc.
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Offline deaville

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Re: Radiation sickness: possible treatment
« Reply #3 on: 11/24/2011 06:33 PM »
A conversation stopper about a trip to Mars. There is evidence, or so I believe, that a use of the solid waste produced by the crew would be to coat the outer skin of the spacecraft. It would seem it makes a very effective radiation blocker.
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Offline aquanaut99

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Re: Radiation sickness: possible treatment
« Reply #4 on: 11/24/2011 06:55 PM »
There is evidence, or so I believe, that a use of the solid waste produced by the crew would be to coat the outer skin of the spacecraft. It would seem it makes a very effective radiation blocker.

Ewwww!
« Last Edit: 11/24/2011 06:56 PM by aquanaut99 »

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