Author Topic: liquefy Martian CO, make steel  (Read 1035 times)

Offline quanthasaquality

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liquefy Martian CO, make steel
« on: 11/14/2011 02:36 PM »
For the record at 9:36 AM, November 14, 2011

Has Pioneer Astronautics considered proposing to NASA about liquefying Martain Atmosphere during Winter at the Martian South Pole, to extract carbon monoxide & oxygen, using the carbon monoxide to reduce iron oxide in the soil, and then form iron carbonyl, to use in production of steel? The South Pole on Mars gets down to ~140 Kelvin in the Winter. The critical point for carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and oxygen is around 130 Kelvin and 35 atmospheres (wikipedia). Liquefication sounds easy with those temperatures.

Christopher England thinks so. He did a study back in 2001 for NASA's Institute of Advanced Concepts (MARRS).  http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/library/meetings/annual/jun00/483England.pdf  He found liquefication of the atmosphere to have potential. The study focused on acquisition of oxygen and water, but carbon monoxide will work too.

You know that carbon monoxide can be used to reduce iron oxide, and produce iron carbonyl. An experimental nuclear reactor (liquid flouride, or pebble bed) might be required to generate the heat, but it's on Mars. So what if the reactor melts down. Mars would be a better place to have steel than Earth, by virtue of its smaller gravity well. If only Mars atmospheric liquefication, iron ore reduction via carbon monoxide, and iron carbonyl formation were put together.

Offline Jim

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Re: liquefy Martian CO, make steel
« Reply #1 on: 11/14/2011 03:17 PM »
For the record at 9:36 AM, November 14, 2011

Has Pioneer Astronautics considered proposing to NASA about liquefying Martain Atmosphere during Winter at the Martian South Pole, to extract carbon monoxide & oxygen, using the carbon monoxide to reduce iron oxide in the soil, and then form iron carbonyl, to use in production of steel? The South Pole on Mars gets down to ~140 Kelvin in the Winter. The critical point for carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and oxygen is around 130 Kelvin and 35 atmospheres (wikipedia). Liquefication sounds easy with those temperatures.

Christopher England thinks so. He did a study back in 2001 for NASA's Institute of Advanced Concepts (MARRS).  http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/library/meetings/annual/jun00/483England.pdf  He found liquefication of the atmosphere to have potential. The study focused on acquisition of oxygen and water, but carbon monoxide will work too.



Don't understand the point of the post.  You ask question and give an answer that doesn't satisfy the question.

what do Pioneer Astronautics  and Christopher England have to do with each other?

Offline Wyvern

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Re: liquefy Martian CO, make steel
« Reply #2 on: 11/17/2011 02:55 AM »
Jim I think this guy(girl?) just copy pasted an article on the thread topic he found and than forgot to actually cite the article.

If not then I think the OP needs to be rewritten.
Darn it where is my Moon base!

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