Author Topic: Ukraine ISS Module  (Read 2276 times)

Offline Prober

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Ukraine ISS Module
« on: 05/30/2011 06:40 AM »
Been doing alot of reading about the Ukraine Space Program and ran into this:
 
It is planned the participation in development of Ukrainian research module for  international space station.
 
anyone heard of a research module from the Ukraine?
 
 
 
 
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Offline Skylab

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Re: Ukraine ISS Module
« Reply #1 on: 05/30/2011 01:30 PM »
That's been a plan for years, and I haven't seen it going anywhere yet.

Quote
Ukraine also counts on participation in ISS and for this purpose it is planning to build its own scientific module for the station. Ukraine and Rusisa signed a bilateral agreement on the sub­ject back in summer 1997.

«We are planning to sign a trilateral agreement in the first half of next year with RSA and NASA on the construction of a Ukrainian module in the framework of the Russian segment of ISS. According to plan, Ukraine will spend $100 to $150 million on developing one of the Russian research modules in order to launch it in 2005 or 2006,» said NSAU Deputy General Director Eduard Kuznetsov.

He added that Ukraine discussed the details of cooperation with Russia and the United States over a year ago and expected support from the European Space Agency. Rusisa intended to build two scientific modules for ISS by the end of 2004. However, the project badly lags behind schedule due to the lack of financing.

«We are planning to jointly develop one of the scientific modules. However, we should once again think over how to compensate this contri­bution to Ukraine. It is most likely that we will guarantee Ukraine access to certain resources of the Russian segment of the ISS,» head of RSA manned programs Mikhail Sinelshchikov said at the Kennedy Center on December 2, 1998.

NSAU counts on using the module for conduct­ing various scientific experiments and also regu­larly sending Ukrainian astronauts to ISS.

http://mdb.cast.ru/mdb/4-2001/mas/usp/ (Section Ukrainian Space Research)

Offline Prober

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Re: Ukraine ISS Module
« Reply #2 on: 05/31/2011 12:12 AM »
Thanks for the fine link Skylab.  I never would have found that.  Fills in some ISS gaps i've read about.
 
From what I've read on the Russian sites, they seem to be closer to building a new station and use the modules planned for ISS on it.  But it could be all talk.
 
 
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Offline Skylab

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Re: Ukraine ISS Module
« Reply #3 on: 05/31/2011 12:55 AM »
No problem whatsoever! We'll see how this turns out, eventually... ;)

Offline PeterAlt

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Re: Ukraine ISS Module
« Reply #4 on: 06/01/2011 11:08 AM »
Yes, I remember this. This bit is obsolete. Originally, Russia was to add two large research modules. This was part of the old plan to grow out the Russian segment. At some point, Russia decided they couldn't afford funding two research modules, so they gave Ukraine the opportunity to own and fund the other one. Ukraine agreed, but time would prove they wouldn't be able to find the funds for it. Additionally, under the original plan, the two modules required Russia to add a Docking and Storage Module, as well as a giant solar wing tower attached to a mini module. Russia simply did not have the funds to complete these and therefore the reach modules were DOA. That lead to the cancellation of the rest of planned modules on the RS. Later, the current expansion plans were approved. The pressurized mini module for the power module became Mini Research Module 2. Combined MRM-1 (built from hardware already built for the planned Eocking and Stowage Module) and MRM-2 replaced the planned larger Russian and Ukrainian research modules. MLM replaced the originally planned Enterprise Module. Under the new plan, a new Node Module will replace the functions that were planned for the Docking and Stowage Module and and is planned for launch in 2013. Under the new plan, two large solar modules that will also double as research modules will be launched in 2014 and 2015. If the Ukraine still wants to participate and finds cash, the Node module will have a free port available.

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