Author Topic: The Shuttle Centaur  (Read 93471 times)

Offline Danderman

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #60 on: 03/18/2011 10:45 pm »
What I don't understand is why this hardware is not used for EELV for LEO payloads. Yeah, I know that there aren't any actual LEO payloads that need it today, but there are plenty of potential payloads, like Orion.

The DIV Heavy upperstage is larger and the current Centaur carries nearly the same amount of propellant.

Do either have 2 engines?

Offline bobthemonkey

Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #61 on: 03/18/2011 10:47 pm »
Dual engine Centaur is a growth option for A-V. It's offered but never been ordered.

Offline Downix

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #62 on: 03/18/2011 10:49 pm »
Dual engine Centaur is a growth option for A-V. It's offered but never been ordered.
Untrue, there was a single Dual-Engine Centaur order, on an Atlas III launch. It is of the older style, with mechanical vs electronic controls, but the rest of the systems are the same.
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Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #63 on: 03/19/2011 04:06 am »
Dual engine Centaur is a growth option for A-V. It's offered but never been ordered.
Untrue, there was a single Dual-Engine Centaur order, on an Atlas III launch. It is of the older style, with mechanical vs electronic controls, but the rest of the systems are the same.
More information (and a photo of the DEC) here.
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Online DaveS

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #64 on: 03/19/2011 12:42 pm »
Sorry for the necromancy, but I just found a bunch of images of the sole Centaur-G on display. Enjoy!
Nice ones, but technically it is the sole G Prime. G was the shorter version. Any other shots? They're kinda repetitive given other photos available on the net. I'm kinda thinking of the right side and some more detailed shots of the CISS hardware.
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Offline jsmjr

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Re: RE: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #65 on: 04/09/2011 09:12 pm »
There were retractable umbilicals (Rolling Beam Umbilical System) on the top of the TSM's which mated with panels on the sides of the orbiter, towards the rear of the payload bay.

The LO2/LH2 were to be dumped during aborts thru the side panels.  There was a H2  vent on top of the tail.

That's pretty fascinating.  Any ideas where might one find descriptions / schematics of how this worked?  (For that matter, I've yet to come across a primer on how the standard umbilicals work.)  I gather Challenger was fitted out with the necessary equipment at the time it was lost. Does Atlantis still have any of this hardware aboard or was it swapped out over the years?

EDIT: Some good discussion begins here: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=17437.msg632423#msg632423
« Last Edit: 04/09/2011 09:21 pm by jsmjr »

Online DaveS

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Re: RE: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #66 on: 04/09/2011 09:29 pm »
There were retractable umbilicals (Rolling Beam Umbilical System) on the top of the TSM's which mated with panels on the sides of the orbiter, towards the rear of the payload bay.

The LO2/LH2 were to be dumped during aborts thru the side panels.  There was a H2  vent on top of the tail.

That's pretty fascinating.  Any ideas where might one find descriptions / schematics of how this worked?  (For that matter, I've yet to come across a primer on how the standard umbilicals work.)  I gather Challenger was fitted out with the necessary equipment at the time it was lost. Does Atlantis still have any of this hardware aboard or was it swapped out over the years?

EDIT: Some good discussion begins here: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=17437.msg632423#msg632423
Here you go: A technical document on the RBUS hardware:
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"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
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Online DaveS

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #67 on: 08/04/2011 09:16 pm »
I also got the top level configuration drawings.
No way you could scan those?

They are full size, I only have a 8x 11 scanner.
No way you could scan them in segments and then use a photo-editing program to stitch them back together? If you can scan and post the segments, I can stitch them back together into the full images.
Just to give this one final shot: Any updates on this?
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline jscott1

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Re: RE: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #68 on: 05/18/2012 04:09 pm »
There were retractable umbilicals (Rolling Beam Umbilical System) on the top of the TSM's which mated with panels on the sides of the orbiter, towards the rear of the payload bay.

The LO2/LH2 were to be dumped during aborts thru the side panels.  There was a H2  vent on top of the tail.

That's pretty fascinating.  Any ideas where might one find descriptions / schematics of how this worked?  (For that matter, I've yet to come across a primer on how the standard umbilicals work.)  I gather Challenger was fitted out with the necessary equipment at the time it was lost. Does Atlantis still have any of this hardware aboard or was it swapped out over the years?

EDIT: Some good discussion begins here: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=17437.msg632423#msg632423
Here you go: A technical document on the RBUS hardware:

Thanks for that blast from the past...

I clearly remember when I first came to work at KSC in 1987 seeing the rolling beam umbilical in a scrap heap behind the Headquarters Building.

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Online DaveS

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #69 on: 06/16/2012 06:51 pm »
Here's a photo I have gotten a hold of. Can someone ID the boxes that can be seen on the left side of the LO2 tank?
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Fequalsma

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #70 on: 06/18/2012 01:17 am »
Always amuses me that they have a pump running 24/7 to keep the monocoque tanks pressurized!
F=ma


Sorry for the necromancy, but I just found a bunch of images of the sole Centaur-G on display. Enjoy!

Offline Jim

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #71 on: 06/18/2012 01:33 am »
Always amuses me that they have a pump running 24/7 to keep the monocoque tanks pressurized!
F=ma


Actually, they didn't have to.  They could put the tanks in stretch. Which is being done to the vehicle above
« Last Edit: 06/18/2012 01:34 am by Jim »

Online DaveS

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #72 on: 06/18/2012 10:13 am »
Anyone have any idea what the boxes on the LO2 tank are? They almost look like they're some sort of thermal covers for the LH2 fill/drain pipe.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online DaveS

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #73 on: 06/23/2012 05:09 pm »
Here's another question. Where was the interface between the Xo1307 bulkhead and the in-flight GH2 vent line? Based on schematics found in the Centaur G Prime Technical Description on L2, I would guess somewhere around the top.

I have attached a photo of the Xo1307 bulkhead. Markings where the various interfaces was would be great!
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online ZachS09

Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #74 on: 11/15/2012 07:37 pm »
Couldn't the Centaur-G, had it not been cancelled, launch the Magellan probe after the Ulysses and Galileo?
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Offline Ares67

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #75 on: 11/15/2012 07:51 pm »
Couldn't the Centaur-G, had it not been cancelled, launch the Magellan probe after the Ulysses and Galileo?

Why? The IUS was quiet sufficient for the job of hauling Magellan to Venus.

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #76 on: 11/15/2012 07:54 pm »
Couldn't the Centaur-G, had it not been cancelled, launch the Magellan probe after the Ulysses and Galileo?

Why? The IUS was quiet sufficient for the job of hauling Magellan to Venus.
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Offline Jim

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #77 on: 11/15/2012 07:58 pm »
Couldn't the Centaur-G, had it not been cancelled, launch the Magellan probe after the Ulysses and Galileo?

Why? The IUS was quiet sufficient for the job of hauling Magellan to Venus.

It was originally planned for Centaur-G

Offline heng44

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Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #78 on: 10/18/2013 01:24 pm »
Here are some photos of the first Shuttle Centaur rollout on August 13, 1985.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2013 06:38 pm by heng44 »

Offline simonbp

Re: The Shuttle Centaur
« Reply #79 on: 10/18/2013 10:13 pm »
Couldn't the Centaur-G, had it not been cancelled, launch the Magellan probe after the Ulysses and Galileo?

Why? The IUS was quiet sufficient for the job of hauling Magellan to Venus.

It was originally planned for Centaur-G

And needed a very tight launch window to make it to Venus. Much like Galileo, Magellan originally had a straight-shot, quick transfer to its target. After Shuttle-Centaur was canceled, Galileo was changed to have a Venus flyby (in order to make up for the missing delta v). Since Galileo took the good launch window, Magellan on IUS had to take a really slow Type II trajectory to Venus.

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