Author Topic: Chinese sub-orbital launches  (Read 138909 times)

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #280 on: 05/17/2018 11:26 PM »
Any info on the launch site of the OS-X rocket?

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #281 on: 05/18/2018 05:40 AM »
From the video, it appear, that the trajectory of the OS-X launch (red) was lower than planned (blue).

Yes, it looks like the planned peak altitude was 40 km, with actual being about 37 km. There also seemed to be a large deviation in the Z axis at 200 km downrange.
« Last Edit: 05/18/2018 05:44 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #282 on: 05/18/2018 06:26 AM »
Article about the launch:
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Chinese_private_firm_launches_first_space_rocket_999.html

Note: given the graphs above, it seems that altitude and downrange distance are mixed up in the article.
« Last Edit: 05/18/2018 06:31 AM by Lewis007 »

Offline SciNews

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #283 on: 05/18/2018 08:09 AM »
Yes, it looks like the planned peak altitude was 40 km, with actual being about 37 km. There also seemed to be a large deviation in the Z axis at 200 km downrange.
From Xinhua:
"The nine-meter-long, 7,200-kg rocket has a maximum altitude of 38.742 kilometers and a top speed of more than 5.7 times the speed of sound, according to Shu Chang, founder and CEO of OneSpace." 
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-05/17/c_137186570.htm
The article mentions "launch center in northwest China" and "manufacturing base in southwest China's Chongqing Municipality"

Offline input~2

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #284 on: 06/04/2018 06:54 PM »
A2048/18 -  FLW SEGMENT OF ATS RTE CLSD. 1. B215:NUKTI-IBANO. 2. G470:IBANO-BIKNO. 3. W191:MOVBI- KARVI. 4. W620:DUNHUANG VOR'DNH'-BIKNO. 5. W621:MOVBI-DUNHUANG VOR'DNH' 6. V67: N4027.9E09724.1- NUKTI. 05 JUN 02:50 2018 UNTIL 05 JUN 03:40 2018. CREATED: 04 JUN 14:28 2018

Offline jcm

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #285 on: 08/06/2018 01:06 AM »
https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/1026268489135214592

China has successfully developed and tested its first hypersonic experimental waverider vehicle. After separating from a carrier rocket, #StarrySky2, which rides its own shock waves, maintained ultrafast speeds above Mach 5.5 for 400+ seconds and reached Mach 6 (7,344 km/h).
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #286 on: 08/06/2018 05:46 AM »
Here's the image that went with that post.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online russianhalo117

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #287 on: 08/11/2018 08:00 PM »
Here's the image that went with that post.
Do we know the launch site yet??

Online russianhalo117

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #288 on: 08/11/2018 08:02 PM »
Here's the image that went with that post.
Do we know the launch site yet??
https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/1026268489135214592

China has successfully developed and tested its first hypersonic experimental waverider vehicle. After separating from a carrier rocket, #StarrySky2, which rides its own shock waves, maintained ultrafast speeds above Mach 5.5 for 400+ seconds and reached Mach 6 (7,344 km/h).
The status was taken down not by the user.

Offline limen4

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #289 on: 08/14/2018 07:56 PM »
Here's the image that went with that post.
Do we know the launch site yet??
XK-2 was launched very likely from as the same location as OS-X on May 17th, i.e. from the sounding rocket range near the Alxa airport (see https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43696.40). I found some footage from a XK-2 launch video which helps to localize the position of the launch pad and the camera.
Another open question is who operates this rocket range. Maybe it is under administration of the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center which supports launches from Alxa with its tracking and control facilities. Another option is that the rocket range belongs to the Huayin Ordnance Test Center (the former Base 32) which operates  a large distance weapon test range north of Alxa.

Online russianhalo117

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #290 on: 08/15/2018 01:34 AM »
Here's the image that went with that post.
Do we know the launch site yet??
XK-2 was launched very likely from as the same location as OS-X on May 17th, i.e. from the sounding rocket range near the Alxa airport (see https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43696.40). I found some footage from a XK-2 launch video which helps to localize the position of the launch pad and the camera.
Another open question is who operates this rocket range. Maybe it is under administration of the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center which supports launches from Alxa with its tracking and control facilities. Another option is that the rocket range belongs to the Huayin Ordnance Test Center (the former Base 32) which operates  a large distance weapon test range north of Alxa.
IHS Janes community thinks both because the Alxa site (multiple now airports use that name in the province) used to be home silos.

Offline limen4

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #291 on: 09/08/2018 05:56 PM »
Thanks to the available OS-X1  launch video  made by the Jilin-1 satellite on Sep 7th, it is now possible to locate the suborbital launch pad (which is very likely also the launch pad for SQZ-1Z two days before) at 41.272869N, 100.297910E. Pic.1 shows 3 images from the footage and their corresponding location in a Google Earth JSLC Map. Take care that in the launch video the north direction corresponds about to the lower site. The launch pad for both missile launches is about 900 meters southwest of Site 3 Launch Test Station  (or Launch Complex A according to the former CIA designation). In recent images (Pic.2 top)  the launch pad is nearly not visible, but in historical images of July 2013 and before (Pic.2 bottom), the circular pad is clearly to see. Maybe this is due to camouflage measures starting in autumn 2013.
The launch video also indicates an exactly westwards launch direction.Together with the known flight distance of 169 kilometers a landing zone can be assumed (Pic.3).
« Last Edit: 09/09/2018 08:51 AM by limen4 »

Offline gdelottle

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #292 on: 09/08/2018 08:08 PM »
Nice video of OS-X1 launch from Jilin-1:

https://gbtimes.com/amazing-footage-of-chinese-rocket-launch-captured-by-orbiting-chinese-video-satellite

Impressive the "super-resolution" capabilities of the observing satellite (~7 deg movement in the sky during the 10 secs of still video).
« Last Edit: 09/08/2018 08:50 PM by gdelottle »

Offline Adrian Norris

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #293 on: 09/12/2018 10:32 AM »
It's a nice video, but was it really taken from a satellite?  In 24 seconds of video, the satellite would have moved ~180km, with about a 10 degree change of viewing angle - which is not apparent in the video.  Were any of the Jilin satellites in a position to have captured this imagery at 04:10 UTC on 7th September?

From CelesTrak:

JILIN 1                 
1 40961U 15057D   18254.21349273  .00000034  00000-0  12815-4 0  9997
2 40961  97.9374 326.3792 0019641  65.7555 294.5711 14.73596860157570

JILIN-1-03             
1 41914U 17002B   18253.87626794  .00000554  00000-0  38330-4 0  9992
2 41914  97.4768 323.1449 0011999 352.0557  94.5832 15.09621092 91976

JILIN-01-04             
1 43022U 17074A   18253.89579380  .00000324  00000-0  24106-4 0  9994
2 43022  97.5355 348.9119 0007775 342.2611 154.9377 15.09549511 44304

JILIN-01-05             
1 43023U 17074B   18253.85217422 -.00000263  00000-0 -12470-4 0  9992
2 43023  97.5352 348.9742 0008277 352.3408 155.7226 15.09547483 44294

JILIN-01-06             
1 43024U 17074C   18254.25062419  .00000319  00000-0  23770-4 0  9997
2 43024  97.5359 349.3127 0010772 351.3760  35.1679 15.09556111 44355

JILIN-01-07             
1 43159U 18008E   18253.89937817 -.00000075  00000-0 -72084-6 0  9991
2 43159  97.5187 326.5274 0013087 198.6040 250.0236 15.09599467 35390

JILIN-01-08             
1 43160U 18008F   18253.86304883 -.00000047  00000-0  99453-6 0  9998
2 43160  97.5184 326.4315 0009033 208.2465 285.1976 15.09604873 35386

« Last Edit: 09/12/2018 11:22 AM by Adrian Norris »

Offline gdelottle

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Re: Chinese sub-orbital launches
« Reply #294 on: 09/12/2018 06:24 PM »
It's a nice video, but was it really taken from a satellite?  In 24 seconds of video, the satellite would have moved ~180km, with about a 10 degree change of viewing angle - which is not apparent in the video.  Were any of the Jilin satellites in a position to have captured this imagery at 04:10 UTC on 7th September?

Yep, I wondered about the very same thing for a few days. As suggested here, the playback is in slow motion.
« Last Edit: 09/12/2018 06:24 PM by gdelottle »

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