Author Topic: The SpaceX Launch Log  (Read 48067 times)

Offline cartman

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #120 on: 10/31/2017 08:14 AM »
First post updated.
Quote
Falcon 9 Flight 45 - Koreasat-5A
payload mass: 3,700 kilograms, orbit: GTO [186]
delivered orbit: 285 x 50185 km x 22.0° [158]
core number: B1042 - Droneship landing - Pad 39A
  F) 2017-10-26, Successful static fire (5 second burn) [156]
  L) 2017-10-30, Successful launch (the one which landed with its pants on fire) [157]
  BR) 2017-10-30, Successful landing on OCISLY [157]

I have also incorporated ClayJar's Falcon 1 contribution:

Quote
Falcon 1 flight 01 - FalconSAT-2
  S) 2005-05-?? (Vandenberg SLC-3W), Igniter sensor failure [159]
  S) 2005-05-?? (Vandenberg SLC-3W), Incorrectly closed helium ground supply valve [160]
  F) 2005-05-27 (Vandenberg SLC-3W), Successful Static Fire [161]
  C) 2005-11-26, Manual vent valve incorrectly set to vent [162]
  C) 2005-12-19, Draining tank during weather hold, valve caused vacuum, deforming the tank [163]
  S) 2006-02-09, Various technical issues [164]
  F) 2006-02-10, Successful Static Fire [165]
  LF) 2006-03-25, Launch failure (the one with the corroded nut) [166]

Falcon 1 flight 02 - DemoFlight 2
  D) 2007-01-19, Second stage TVC pitch actuator issue [167]
  D) 2007-02-07, Delay due to range availability [168]
  D) 2007-03-07, Installing upgraded TVC boards [169]
  F) 2007-03-15, Successful static fire [170]
  C) 2007-03-19, Aborted during range source telemetry switchover [171]
  C) 2007-03-20, Abort on chamber pressure 1% low [172]
  LF) 2007-03-20, Launch failure (the one with too much slosh) [173]

Falcon 1 flight 03 - Trailblazer, NanoSail-D, PRESat, Explorers
  D) 2008-06-23, Range availability after finding weld defect [174][175]
  F) 2008-06-25, Successful Static Fire [176]
  C) 2008-08-02, Parameter about 1% out of range (turbopump purge pressure) [177]
  LF) 2008-08-02, Launch failure (the one that hit itself for lack of a few seconds' delay at stage sep) [178]

Falcon 1 flight 04 - RatSat
  F) 2008-09-20, Successful Static Fire [179]
  D) 2008-09-23, Replacing a 2nd stage LOX supply line component [180]
  L) 2008-09-28, Successful launch (the one that finally made it to orbit) [178]

Falcon 1 flight 05 - RazakSAT
  F) 2009-04-15, Successful static fire [181]
  D) 2009-04-20, Delay for "Potential impact of predicted vehicle environments on the satellite" [182]
  L) 2009-07-13, Successful launch (the one that orbited the first real satellite) [183]


->Falcon 9 v1.0
Falcon 9 flight 01 - Test flight 1
  S) 2010-03-09, Abort at spin start T-0:02[44]
  X) 2010-03-11, Weather Scrub of Static Fire Attempt [184]
  F) 2010-03-13, Successful Static Fire [185]
  C) 2010-06-04, Out of range engine parameter, sensor error T-0:01[43]
  L) 2010-06-04, Successful launch (the one with the rolling second stage) [144]
« Last Edit: 10/31/2017 08:30 AM by cartman »

Online abaddon

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #121 on: 11/02/2017 03:34 PM »
I have my own spreadsheet which compares flight rates of a subset of similar EELV class launchers (although it's a little out of date right now) in a similar way.
I've updated my version of this to be up to date with the latest launches, and attached the chart here for funzies.

Falcon 9 tied Delta IV in number of launches with its May 15th launch this year of Inmarsat-5, and passed it June 3rd with the launch of CRS-11.  Next up is HII, which it should pass sometime early next year.

Notes:
- I picked these launchers because I was interested to compare them.  I know I left lots out.
- HII includes -A and -B
- Delta IV includes Heavy
- ULA* is the EELV-class launches, so just Atlas V and Delta IV, and includes only those launches that were under the auspices of ULA.  Atlas V and Delta IV individually cover their entire launch history.
- My charts grow horizontally instead of vertically, maybe because it makes them look like rocket launches...
- Lots of manual data entry here, so there are probably some errors, which are all mine.
« Last Edit: 11/02/2017 04:18 PM by abaddon »

Offline ATPTourFan

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #122 on: 11/08/2017 05:12 PM »
Possible to flip the X and Y axes on that one? I don't know if it's me but my brain usually does time on the horizontal left->right and quantity on vertical. Thanks for these great infographics.

Offline Lar

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #123 on: 11/08/2017 05:32 PM »
Possible to flip the X and Y axes on that one? I don't know if it's me but my brain usually does time on the horizontal left->right and quantity on vertical. Thanks for these great infographics.
Agreed. I think it shows the trends better that way. But even if not, THANKS for doing that, great work
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 05:33 PM by Lar »
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Online abaddon

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #124 on: 11/08/2017 09:38 PM »
I'm open to trying... IFF someone can explain how to do this in Excel.  My data is really quite simple... a first set of rows for each line of dates (not important here) and then a second set for the days starting at zero for each, e.g.:

HII   0   206   408   926   1393 ...
Ariane 5   0   513   869   1284   1386 ...
Atlas V   0   265   330   849   933 ...
Delta IV   0   111   282   762   1281 ...
ULA*   0   98   216   247   276 ...
Falcon 9   0   187   718   857   1001 ...

Generating the chart I have is as simple as selecting the rows and inserting a Line chart.  Swapping the X and Y axis has so far proven to be as elusive as finding a Unicorn :(.  Swapping row/column data is not the answer... it's not a scatter plot so I can't swap X and Y axes...

As usual with M$ software trying to do the simplest and most obvious things is sometimes hair-pullingly frustrating.

Online envy887

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #125 on: 11/08/2017 11:15 PM »
I'm open to trying... IFF someone can explain how to do this in Excel.  My data is really quite simple... a first set of rows for each line of dates (not important here) and then a second set for the days starting at zero for each, e.g.:

HII   0   206   408   926   1393 ...
Ariane 5   0   513   869   1284   1386 ...
Atlas V   0   265   330   849   933 ...
Delta IV   0   111   282   762   1281 ...
ULA*   0   98   216   247   276 ...
Falcon 9   0   187   718   857   1001 ...

Generating the chart I have is as simple as selecting the rows and inserting a Line chart.  Swapping the X and Y axis has so far proven to be as elusive as finding a Unicorn :(.  Swapping row/column data is not the answer... it's not a scatter plot so I can't swap X and Y axes...

As usual with M$ software trying to do the simplest and most obvious things is sometimes hair-pullingly frustrating.

Excel isn't set up well to easily plot multiple sets of independent variables; usually datasets have a single independent variable and multiple dependent variables. This is a complex selection and Excel doesn't recognize it automatically.

Anyway, plotting this set with time on the horizontal axis isn't hard, just:

1) Insert a line below your HII data
2) Fill this line with the launch number, going left to right (just 1   2   3   4   5 ....)
3) Select the HII data and the launch number data and go to Insert -> Scatterplot. You have to use scatterplot to add the other lines later.
4) Right click on the plot and go to "Select Data".
5) Go to "Add"
6) Select the next vehicle as the series name, the launch date as the X variable, and the launch number line as the Y variable; hit OK
7) Repeat steps 5-7 until you have all the vehicles on the plot.

Edit: realized that I might as well just attach the spreadsheet with the plot already set up so you can just copy your data in :)
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 11:28 PM by envy887 »

Online abaddon

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #126 on: 11/09/2017 02:07 PM »
Thanks much @envy887 for the detailed directions - very helpful!  Here's my second go at it, with some slightly snazzier formatting.  I'm also attaching a different view that attempts to show comparative launch cadences for the different launchers.  It's not quite what I wanted (I'd like the smaller values to overlap the larger values) but it's close enough for a first shot.  I think for this one it makes sense to have days as the vertical axis... but we'll see :).

Notes:
- I picked these launchers because I was interested to compare them.  I know I left lots out.
- HII includes -A and -B
- Delta IV includes Heavy (and Falcon 9 will include FH launches)
- ULA* is the EELV-class launches, so just Atlas V and Delta IV, and includes only those launches that were under the auspices of ULA.  Atlas V and Delta IV individually cover their entire launch history.
- Falcon 9 launches include the AMOS launch campaign. 
- Lots of manual data entry here, so there are probably some errors, which are all mine.
« Last Edit: 11/09/2017 02:15 PM by abaddon »

Online gongora

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #127 on: 11/09/2017 02:19 PM »
The ULA data on that graph really doesn't fit with the rest of the data.  ULA already had mature launch vehicles, and all of the other lines start from first launch.
« Last Edit: 11/09/2017 02:21 PM by gongora »

Online abaddon

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #128 on: 11/09/2017 02:25 PM »
The ULA data on that graph really doesn't fit with the rest of the data.  ULA already had mature launch vehicles, and all of the other lines start from first launch.
Yes, I'm aware of that.  That's why I graphed Atlas V and Delta IV separately as well.  I think it is interesting to have both sets of data.  You can really see what an advantage it is to start with mature launchers.

Offline ClayJar

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #129 on: 11/09/2017 06:06 PM »
Since everyone is playing with the data, I figured I'd play a little during lunch today.  Attached is a chart showing two versions of the launch cadence of Falcon 9.  The blue data is actual reality, and the orange data replaces the two long periods of standing down (CRS-7 and AMOS-6) with delays only equal to the average of the launch before and after each one.  I let Excel do a completely naive exponential trendline on each, and I noted the slopes at the top end of each trendline (a launch every 15 days at this point in the adjusted reality).  It may not reflect actual reality or have much statistical vigor, but the trendline on the adjusted reality does look nice, eh?  ;D

And to make things easier for anyone wanting to play around with the data, I took the launch log and parsed it into a more easily usable tab-delimited text form.  I tried to find a balance between ease of use and efficiency so you can use basic tools to simply select relevant lines and have what you need.  (It doesn't have all the payload and orbit data, but I did include a column for style -- Dragon vs. fairing -- as that seemed likely to be useful to someone.)  Anyway, it's attached.

Offline mikelepage

Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #130 on: 11/14/2017 03:09 AM »
Quick note re nomenclature: seems like we stopped keeping track of block 4/5, even though we noted 1.0, 1.1, and 1.2 FT.

The way I understand it, in terms of version number, we've had/we're expecting:
F9 1.0
F9 1.1
F9 FT (1.2)
F9 Block 4 (1.3)
F9 Block 5 (1.4)

Falcon 9 Flight 40 - CRS-12 was the debut of Block 4
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/08/falcon-9-block-4-debut-success-dragon-station-berthing/

but I don't know what rocket was used for
Falcon 9 Flight 41 - Formosat-5
Falcon 9 Flight 42 - OTV-5 (X-37B Spaceplane)
Falcon 9 Flight 43 - Iridium NEXT-3
Falcon 9 Flight 44 - SES 11/Echostar 105
Falcon 9 Flight 45 - Koreasat-5A

Side note to Cartman: I know the last 1.1 flew after the first 1.2, so that was why those flights are out of order in the log, but I think it's probably just better to keep the flights in order and note which block was used once we find out.  Especially once Falcon Heavy (&BFR!) start flying, it's worth keeping it in flight order imho.

Offline old_sellsword

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The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #131 on: 11/14/2017 03:58 AM »
Quick note re nomenclature: seems like we stopped keeping track of block 4/5, even though we noted 1.0, 1.1, and 1.2 FT.

The way I understand it, in terms of version number, we've had/we're expecting:
F9 1.0
F9 1.1
F9 FT (1.2)
F9 Block 4 (1.3)
F9 Block 5 (1.4)

The nomenclature (to the best of our knowledge) is as follows:

F9 v1.0 (Block 1)
F9 v1.1
F9 v1.2 (Blocks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

So everything after Orbcomm OG2 M2 (except Jason 3) is F9 v1.2, there is no v1.3 or v1.4. Within the “version” nomenclature, it would be easiest to represent Blocks with another decimal (ie Block 5 is F9 v1.2.5).


Falcon 9 Flight 40 - CRS-12 was the debut of Block 4
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/08/falcon-9-block-4-debut-success-dragon-station-berthing/

but I don't know what rocket was used for
Falcon 9 Flight 41 - Formosat-5
Falcon 9 Flight 42 - OTV-5 (X-37B Spaceplane)
Falcon 9 Flight 43 - Iridium NEXT-3
Falcon 9 Flight 44 - SES 11/Echostar 105
Falcon 9 Flight 45 - Koreasat-5A

NROL-76 used the first Block 4 S2, but CRS-11 and BulgariaSat-1 used the last two Block 3 S2s after the introduction of Block 4 S2.

CRS-12 used the first Block 4 S1, but FORMOSAT-5, SES-11/EchoStar 105, Iridium-4, and maybe Iridium-5 used a Block 3 S1 after that (a couple of those are reflights of Block 3 S1s).

Block 5 S1 should be leaving Hawthorne relatively soon, within a month or two.
« Last Edit: 11/14/2017 04:00 AM by old_sellsword »

Offline mikelepage

Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #132 on: 11/14/2017 04:19 AM »
So everything after Orbcomm OG2 M2 (except Jason 3) is F9 v1.2, there is no v1.3 or v1.4. Within the “version” nomenclature, it would be easiest to represent Blocks with another decimal (ie Block 5 is F9 v1.2.5).

...

NROL-76 used the first Block 4 S2, but CRS-11 and BulgariaSat-1 used the last two Block 3 S2s after the introduction of Block 4 S2.

CRS-12 used the first Block 4 S1, but FORMOSAT-5, SES-11/EchoStar 105, Iridium-4, and maybe Iridium-5 used a Block 3 S1 after that (a couple of those are reflights of Block 3 S1s).

Block 5 S1 should be leaving Hawthorne relatively soon, within a month or two.

Aha, thanks.  That makes much more sense.

Out of curiosity, does this make SpaceX fairly unusual in the rocket industry (to be "mixing and matching" different block stages)?  Or is this standard practice when rolling out new improvements?

Online Comga

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Re: The SpaceX Launch Log
« Reply #133 on: 11/23/2017 05:44 PM »
This is a thread that has grown out of the SpaceX Scrubs thread into a stand-alone launch log. With your help I will try to capture everything interesting about each launch, including payload info. The first post will have the full log, while new info and discussion can happen in subsequent posts.
(snip)
Hey!
When did this list become complete, all the way back to the first Falcon 1 launch?
This is terrific!
Such a useful reference.
Thank you cartman, et.al.!


edit:
PS envy887 & abaddon: There are easier ways to make and modify graphs in Excel, including multiple horizontal axes.
abaddon: How about converting your "Cadence" graph from intervals (days) to cadence (1/days)  by inverting and fitting to some curve that saturates?  If you attach the date to a post I can give it a try and show what I mean.

« Last Edit: 11/23/2017 05:50 PM by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

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