Author Topic: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018  (Read 144036 times)

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII April 2018
« Reply #280 on: 02/05/2018 01:20 AM »
ISRO Chief hints that Chandrayaan-II could be delayed a bit, with GSLV MkIII D2 happening prior to that. The April launch quoted earlier may have been more of an optimistic target in any case..

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/isro-needs-4-years-to-catch-up-with-satellite-demand-dr-sivan/article22651083.ece

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As a part of the three-year short-term action plan, immediate missions that we plan to do this year are the GSLV-F08 that will launch the GSAT-6A communication satellite [around February]. Then we will have a PSLV mission with navigation satellite IRNSS-1I. Then comes the second developmental flight D2 of GSLV-MkIII. It will launch the high throughput satellite GSAT-29. Later, GSAT-11, which will be our heaviest satellite as of now, will be launched from Kourou. The Chandrayaan-2 mission will be launched this year on another GSLV.

Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII April 2018
« Reply #281 on: 02/08/2018 07:01 AM »
The following news report discusses many startling details of ISRO'S ambitious Chandrayaan II mission -  likely to be launched in April - carrying an orbiter, a lander and a rover. After being launched into an elliptical earth parking orbit by the GSLV II, it will be gradually sent to the Moon by the onboard thrusters of Chandrayaan II through the slingshot or the raising of the orbit of the spacecraft just the way Chadrayaan I was sent.

Chandrayaan-2 mission: Rover to spend 14 days on moon's surface, says Isro chief

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Unlike the first lunar mission when a PSLV rocket carried the spacecraft to the moon's orbit, this time heavy-payload lifter GSLV Mk II will launch the spacecraft weighing 3,290kg as the module will carry an orbiter, a rover and a lander to the moon.

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Dr Sivan said, "After reaching the moon's orbit, the lander will get detached from the orbiter and do a soft-landing near the south pole of the moon. The 6-wheeled rover fixed within the lander will get detached and move on the lunar surface. The rover has been designed in such a way that it will have power to spend a lunar day or 14 Earth days on the moon's surface and walk up to 150-200 metres. It will do several experiments and on-site chemical analysis of the surface."

The Isro chairman said, "The rover will then send data and images of the lunar surface back to the Earth through the orbiter within 15 minutes.

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After spending 14 earth days, the rover will go in a sleep mode. We are hoping the rover will again come alive whenever that part of the moon (where the rover will land) gets sunlight and recharges the rover's solar cells. Besides the rover, the orbiter will also capture images of the moon while orbiting it."

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On testing of lunar components, Dr Sivan said, "All three components of the lunar module are almost ready. Currently, their integration is going on. Once the module is ready, it will have to go through rigorous tests." On fixing launch date, he said, "The launch date will depend on various factors like the moon's relative position with respect to the Earth.

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Once the GSLV is launched, it will put the spacecraft in the 170 km x 20,000 km elliptical orbit. From the elliptical orbit, the craft will be manoeuvred towards the lunar orbit by firing thrusters. Therefore, we expect it to reach the lunar orbit in two months."

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
« Reply #282 on: 02/18/2018 07:35 AM »
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In the run-up to the most challenging space exploration programme undertaken ever by India, ISRO chairman K Sivan told Express that integration of all the three components of the spacecraft is nearing completion at ISRO Satellite Centre in Bengaluru. “The next 45-60 days will be crucial as the composite pack, comprising Orbiter, Lander and Rover will go through a series of rigorous tests in disassembled and assembled mode. The outcome of these test results will determine the launch date. If we succeed to achieve the desired results in the first attempt, then the launch would take place in April, but in case any technical problems are encountered, there would be a delay. Since this is the first such attempt being made, there is always an uncertainty,” he said.

The chairman said the launch window is fixed between April and October, within which the space agency hopes to accomplish the mission. “The launch date depends on multiple factors like the moon’s relative position with respect to Earth. After the lift-off from Sriharikota, it would take approximately two months to reach the designated moon’s orbit. Another important factor is that when the Lander makes the touchdown on the pre-determined site near south pole of lunar surface,  there should be sunlight. In a month, moon sees sunlight for only 14 days,” Sivan said.
Source


Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
« Reply #284 on: 02/20/2018 05:17 AM »
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With the much-awaited Chandrayaan-2 mission, India's second flight to the moon, Isro is attempting to pull off a daredevil manoeuvre. It will be the first-ever mission to soft land near the moon's south pole, which poses a number of challenges.

"We have identified two locations and will be choosing one. No other moon mission has landed in this area," said former Isro chief AS Kiran Kumar on Saturday, who retired as Isro chairman last month.

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In preparation for this touchdown, landing simulations are currently on at Isro's Liquid Propulsion System Centre at Mahendra Giri in Tamil Nadu. The exercise involves a prototype of the lander simulating a soft landing from a height of 70-80 metres.


Source : Isro plans landing near moon’s south pole with Chandrayaan-2

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Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
« Reply #285 on: 02/22/2018 02:06 PM »
Very likely this will be delayed to June-July time frame given the fact that second launch pad has a backlog to clear before this can launch. GSLV MK-2 F-08/GSAT-6A and GSLV MK-3 D2/GSAT-29 are both set for launch before GSLV MK-2 F-10/Chandraayan-2. 

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
« Reply #286 on: 02/23/2018 04:33 AM »
GSLV MK-2 F-08/GSAT-6A pushed to late march. Chandraayan-2 launch before may is impossible at this point.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-tamilnadu/gsat-11-launch-in-april-or-may-isro/article22830646.ece

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
« Reply #287 on: 02/25/2018 12:47 PM »
Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?

Presumably, as it takes a certain of amount of time to reach the Moon, regardless of route chosen and that ISRO would like to land early in the Lunar day, this would mean the window would open for a few days each month.
ISRO chief speaking on Chandrayaan-II launch window.

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Therefore, just in case something needs an upgrade and we miss this clear visibility window in April, our next chance will be in October. But the activities are in full steam targeting April,” he said.

Source

I wonder why he says that if they miss April the next launch window is only in October? I had thought earlier they would have one every month or so considering the start of the lunar day. Is it the position of the moon relative to the apogee of the initial parking orbit (not sure what exactly is the technical term for it, sorry.. argument of perigee?) acting as an additional constraint?
« Last Edit: 02/25/2018 12:57 PM by vineethgk »

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #288 on: 02/26/2018 05:08 AM »
You're right, of course, that the Moon's always there and we could launch towards it in any month.  But once the trajectory is defined - trans-lunar coast, lunar orbit injection, lunar orbit all in a specific geometry leading to periapsis over the landing site, the question is: when does that periapsis, when landing would occur, coincide with sunrise at the landing site?  To get the longest possible rover mission the landing needs to be shortly after sunrise, since it may die after sunset.  The trajectory can be flown any month but the combination of trajectory and illumination is more restrictive and repeats at 6 month intervals.  They could go in another month if they accept a different landing site, and they do have one alternative site.  This limitation is much less severe near the equator, so it applied far less to Surveyor and the early Apollo landings.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #289 on: 02/27/2018 07:32 AM »
The trajectory can be flown any month but the combination of trajectory and illumination is more restrictive and repeats at 6 month intervals.

That's right, but the Moon has the same illumination every month. However, the inclination of the launch site will change relative to the Moon and if you are performance limited, that restricts you to launch at the optimum month.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #290 on: 03/02/2018 11:24 PM »
Chandrayaan-II likely delayed to October

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India’s second mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-2, is likely to be launched only in October. Further delays cannot be ruled out if systems are not yet in place by then.
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An Isro official told TOIseveral tests have to be done and arrangements need to be made.
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The original plan envisaged the launch between April and November with the real target focussed for April. Top Isro officials had expressed confidence that the takeoff will happen in April.
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But on Friday, it was stated the lunar mission was not yet ready for an April lift-off and much still needs to be done.

Source

Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #291 on: 03/03/2018 05:16 AM »
Chandrayaan-II likely delayed to October

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India’s second mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-2, is likely to be launched only in October. Further delays cannot be ruled out if systems are not yet in place by then.
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An Isro official told TOIseveral tests have to be done and arrangements need to be made.
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The original plan envisaged the launch between April and November with the real target focussed for April. Top Isro officials had expressed confidence that the takeoff will happen in April.
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But on Friday, it was stated the lunar mission was not yet ready for an April lift-off and much still needs to be done.

Source

I expected the delay and waited without making comments so that I might prove wrong. But my assumption has come true. Who knows whether the lift-off can take place in October, because of one thing. ISRO's preoccupation with PSLV launch every month has put paid to the development of more powerful launch vehicles. ISRO seems to be content with the launch of PSLV only. GSLV MK-II needs to be uprated to launch at least 2.5 Ton payload to GTO. At least two GSLV MK-II launches need to take place before the launch of Chandrayaan-II. The performance of the uprated Cryogenic Engine which is supposed to generate 90 kN thrust needs to be verified with the launch of at least two GSLV MK-II. Then what to speak of the testing of the rover and landers. Frankly speaking, since former ISRO Chairman G. Madhavan Nair retired, Chandrayaan-II Mission faltered with his immediate successor busy in doing pilgrimage when ISRO was seriously working on the launch of GSLV MK-II with the indigeneous cryogenic engine. Then what happened is known to all of us. Two successive GSL MK-II launches failed, resulting in the GSLV MK-II getting the sobriquet of naughty boy. It was not until the former ISRO chairman A. S. Kiran Kumar that both GSLV MK-II and GSLV MK-III wer back into contention.

Can anyone tell me if the uprated cryogenic engine of GSLV MK-II is re-startable ? Any cryogenic engine propelled upper stage that is NOT RE-STARTABLE is simply of no vital use. This may sound harsh to many of us, but that is the reality. GSLV MK-II's cryogenic engine will not be able to do TLI maneuver. Can it do this ? Chandrayan-II has to reach the moon through the spacecraft's gradual orbit raising, thus taking it almost two months to get to the moon. ISRO seems to have its task cut out.

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Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #292 on: 03/04/2018 07:19 AM »
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Can anyone tell me if the uprated cryogenic engine of GSLV MK-II is re-startable ? Any cryogenic engine propelled upper stage that is NOT RE-STARTABLE is simply of no vital use. This may sound harsh to many of us, but that is the reality. GSLV MK-II's cryogenic engine will not be able to do TLI maneuver. Can it do this ? Chandrayan-II has to reach the moon through the spacecraft's gradual orbit raising, thus taking it almost two months to get to the moon. ISRO seems to have its task cut out.

The answer is yes and no. The CE-7.5 is based on the RD-56 engine of the former soviet union. The RD-56 was a restartable engine and so by extension is the CE-7.5. However the CE-7.5 in its current iteration is NOT restartable as isro minimised extra features of the engine in order to get the basic functionality of the engine working. ISRO has said that at some point in the future they do intend to make the CE-7.5 restartable if the need arises.

Offline srikanthr124

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« Last Edit: 03/13/2018 06:53 AM by srikanthr124 »

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
« Reply #294 on: 03/23/2018 01:26 PM »
Finally, official confirmation from ISRO that Chandrayaan-II has been delayed to October (though that was long expected)..

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The launch of India's second lunar mission 'Chandrayaan-2', slated for next month, has been postponed to October as the experts have suggested some tests, the ISRO said today.

Source

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
« Reply #295 on: 03/25/2018 02:14 AM »
New targeted date for Chandrayaan-II launch is in the first week of October - ISRO Chairman
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Dr Sivan said, “The original targeted date for the launch was kept on April 23. However, as the ongoing tests for the lunar mission will take 20 more days, the April 23rd date could not be met. Therefore the panel decided to defer the launch. Unlike, other satellite launches where Isro could easily defer the launch by a day or two to get a perfect mission, Isro can’t do the same in this mission. This is because the ideal date for the moon launch comes only once in a month. If we skip that date of the month, we have to plan the launch next month. After April, if Isro launches the mission from May to September, we won’t be able to utilise the full lunar day (14 Earth days) for experiments on the moon because of eclipses. Therefore, Isro will launch the mission in the first week of October.”

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
« Reply #296 on: 03/25/2018 04:20 AM »
The article also mentions that they could launch every month, but the six month delay is caused by "eclipses" so as to get the required landing light condition. Not sure if the eclipses refer to that in LEO or in LLO.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
« Reply #297 on: 03/26/2018 07:19 AM »
I wish they has just said october from the start. Making all these unachievable targets and missing them is bad PR.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
« Reply #298 on: 03/27/2018 11:58 PM »
Planned vehicle upgrades for GSLV for the Chandrayaan-II mission

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“All these new things are being done keeping lunar mission in the mind and ISRO’s bigger game plan to increase GSLV payload capability. For Chandrayaan-2, we are formulating a perfect combination. The four strap-ons and second stage will be boosted with high-thrust Vikas engines; cryogenic upper stage will be loaded with enhanced propellants of 15 tonnes instead of current 12.8 tonnes and will be operated with 9.5 tonne thrust compared to the present 7.5.”

Source

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
« Reply #299 on: 03/28/2018 05:35 AM »
Planned vehicle upgrades for GSLV for the Chandrayaan-II mission

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“All these new things are being done keeping lunar mission in the mind and ISRO’s bigger game plan to increase GSLV payload capability. For Chandrayaan-2, we are formulating a perfect combination. The four strap-ons and second stage will be boosted with high-thrust Vikas engines; cryogenic upper stage will be loaded with enhanced propellants of 15 tonnes instead of current 12.8 tonnes and will be operated with 9.5 tonne thrust compared to the present 7.5.”

Source

So it's confirmed that GSLV F-10 will be the "upgraded GSLV" that isro has been hinting at