Author Topic: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 30 2019  (Read 165508 times)

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #220 on: 10/24/2016 10:21 PM »
Quote
ISRO starts landing tests for Chandrayaan-2 mission

Simulated lunar craters created in Chitradurga to plan Lander’s descent

The Indian Space Research Organsiation started a series of ground and aerial tests linked to the critical Moon landing of Chandrayaan-2 on Friday, at its new site at Challakere in Chitradurga district, 400 km from Bengaluru.

ISRO Satellite Centre or ISAC, the lead centre for the second Moon mission, has artificially created close to ten craters to simulate the lunar terrain and test the Lander’s sensors.

A small ISRO aircraft has been carrying equipment with sensors over these craters to plan the tasks ahead.

ISRO, along with a host of other scientific and strategic agencies, owns vast land for its future missions at Challakere, in a ‘Science City.’

ISAC Director M.Annadurai told The Hindu, “The campaign for the Lander tests of Chandrayaan-2 has started. Tests are conducted over the simulated craters at Chitradurga. We are using an aircraft to assess whether the sensors on the Lander will do their job [later] of identifying the landing spot on the Moon.”

Chandrayaan-2 is tentatively set for late 2017 or early 2018 and includes soft-landing on Moon and moving a rover on its surface.

‘Complicated task’
Landing on an alien surface is very complicated, said Dr. Annadurai, who was also the Project Director for the successful Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission of 2008.

In the coming months up to March, ISAC would conduct many tests: on avionics and electronics; testing the Lander’s legs, followed by a combined full test, at Bengaluru and Chitradurga.

The mission includes an Orbiter, a Lander and a Rover, all being readied at ISAC in Bengaluru. The Orbiter spacecraft when launched from Sriharikota will travel to the Moon and release the Lander, which will in turn deploy a tiny Rover to roam the lunar surface — all three sending data and pictures to Earth.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/isro-starts-landing-tests-for-chandrayaan2-mission/article9262825.ece

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #221 on: 10/25/2016 05:23 AM »
Huh, I didn't notice until now that while the lander will probably be the 1st spacecraft to land on the lunar poles, the lander instruments are oriented towards the lunar interior (seismic instrument, thermal probe, Langmuir probe) with the only surface geology oriented instruments being the APXS and laser spectrometer on the rover, which isn't planned to survive the 1st lunar night. Isn't that a bit strange?  :-\

Also I don't see any scientific oriented cameras on the lander and rover - though I guess there must be some on the lander to monitor the rover deployment? I wonder what are their specifications and abilities to do detailed observations of the landing site? ???
« Last Edit: 10/25/2016 05:32 AM by Galactic Penguin SST »
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline ZachS09

Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #222 on: 10/25/2016 03:17 PM »
Has ISRO given a name for the rover? We already know that the orbiter will be "Chandrayaan 2".
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #223 on: 10/25/2016 04:27 PM »
Has ISRO given a name for the rover? We already know that the orbiter will be "Chandrayaan 2".
Not heard any. But considering the highly imaginative name they gave to the Mars mission, I hope it isn't 'Moon Rover'.

Offline ZachS09

Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #224 on: 10/25/2016 06:44 PM »
What if they named the rover "Khojakarta"?

It means "Explorer" in Hindi.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #225 on: 10/25/2016 11:49 PM »
Keep it in mind!  They might have a competition to name it.  China has done and is doing that.
« Last Edit: 10/26/2016 04:20 PM by Phil Stooke »

Online sanman

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #226 on: 10/26/2016 03:19 AM »
How do they do these landing tests, anyway? And with what kind of aircraft? I'm picturing in my head a hexacopter drone, equipped with sensors that would be used on the lander - would that fill the bill? Could you simulate a lunar lander using a hexacopter-style of drone? What would be required for a reasonably accurate simulation?

Online sanman

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #227 on: 10/27/2016 11:19 AM »
ISRO chief Dr S Kiran Kumar gave a presentation on Chandrayaan-1 at IUCCA (Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics) and the tail end of his talk included a little bit on Chandrayaan-2:

« Last Edit: 10/27/2016 11:38 AM by sanman »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #228 on: 10/28/2016 07:22 AM »
Slides from the presentation.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online sanman

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #229 on: 11/15/2016 04:12 AM »

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #230 on: 11/15/2016 12:17 PM »
"The life expectancy of the lander and the orbiter as estimated now is one (Earth) day, which means 14 lunar days."

Let us hope the landing simulations are more accurate than the lunar calendar simulations.

Online sanman

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #231 on: 11/19/2016 07:14 AM »
"The life expectancy of the lander and the orbiter as estimated now is one (Earth) day, which means 14 lunar days."

Let us hope the landing simulations are more accurate than the lunar calendar simulations.

Heh, I think that's just the Indian media again - they're often a poor intermediary for spreading accurate info to the public.  :-[

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #232 on: 11/19/2016 11:46 PM »
The launch date in the title is now listed as December 2018. Where did this information come from? I couldn't find it in any recent posts or in the launch manifest.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #233 on: 02/09/2017 02:53 PM »
http://pib.gov.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=158310

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has started a series of ground tests for testing the performance of sensors and actuators for soft landing of the Lander on the lunar surface.   

Special tests for new systems in Lander have been identified and a Lander Sensors Performance Test over artificial craters created in Chitradurga district in Karnataka, has been conducted. Lunar Terrain Test facility is ready for Lander drop test and Rover mobility tests.

ISRO is working towards the launch of Chandrayaan-2 during the first quarter of 2018. The Chandrayaan-2 comprises of indigenous Orbiter, Lander and Rover. After reaching the 100 km lunar orbit, the Lander housing the Rover will separate from the Orbiter. After a controlled descent, the Lander will soft land on the lunar surface at a specified site and deploy a Rover. The instruments on the rover will collect data for analysis of the lunar soil.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #234 on: 02/16/2017 04:28 PM »
Ok. We are getting closer..

Lunar lander ready to be tested

Quote
The static test of the lander module of Chandrayaan- 2 will be held at the ISRO Propulsion Complex, Mahendragiri, by the end of February.

Director, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), S. Somanath, told The Hindu that the test would measure the performance of the propulsion system of the lander module.

Mr.Somanath said the soft landing involved in the Chandrayaan- 2 mission required special propulsion and control systems and complex electronics. The lander would have four engines to make a controlled descent from the orbiter.

For the static test, the craft would be mounted on a frame and the four engines fired at varying thrust.

A month later, another lander module, a replica of the first one, would be tested in a suspended state. The craft would be hung from a crane and the engines fired to move the module in different directions and simulate a soft landing.


Offline worldtimedate

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #235 on: 02/16/2017 07:30 PM »
Ok. We are getting closer..

Lunar lander ready to be tested

Quote
The static test of the lander module of Chandrayaan- 2 will be held at the ISRO Propulsion Complex, Mahendragiri, by the end of February.

Director, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), S. Somanath, told The Hindu that the test would measure the performance of the propulsion system of the lander module.

Mr.Somanath said the soft landing involved in the Chandrayaan- 2 mission required special propulsion and control systems and complex electronics. The lander would have four engines to make a controlled descent from the orbiter.

For the static test, the craft would be mounted on a frame and the four engines fired at varying thrust.

A month later, another lander module, a replica of the first one, would be tested in a suspended state. The craft would be hung from a crane and the engines fired to move the module in different directions and simulate a soft landing.


I am concerned about the launcher GSLV MK-II. It has not yet attained higher capability yet. It needs to be launched 2 to 3 times more before it launches the Chandrayaan 2 which will have a lift off mass of 3250 Kg.

Launch mass :
Combined: 3,250 kg (7,170 lb)

Payload mass :
Orbiter: 1,400 kg (3,100 lb)
Rover: 20 kg (44 lb)

ISRO has to ramp up its Launcher Capability, otherwise the gain it made by launching Chandrayan 1 that discovered water in the Moon and sending Mangalyaan at the first attempt will lose its advantage. Because of the heavier launch capability Launcher China's moon mission has raced away faster than India's.

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Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #236 on: 02/16/2017 07:54 PM »


I am concerned about the launcher GSLV MK-II. It has not yet attained higher capability yet. It needs to be launched 2 to 3 times more before it launches the Chandrayaan 2 which will have a lift off mass of 3250 Kg.

Launch mass :
Combined: 3,250 kg (7,170 lb)

Payload mass :
Orbiter: 1,400 kg (3,100 lb)
Rover: 20 kg (44 lb)

ISRO has to ramp up its Launcher Capability, otherwise the gain it made by launching Chandrayan 1 that discovered water in the Moon and sending Mangalyaan at the first attempt will lose its advantage. Because of the heavier launch capability Launcher China's moon mission has raced away faster than India's.

--- [ --- ]

Chandrayaan-II will likely be launched only by the later half of 2018 after completion of all the tests, and GSLV is likely to make 2-3 flights more by then. And we need to bear in mind that GSLV would be deploying CY-II to a sub-GTO orbit like the PSLV does in case of IRNSS sats.

And why do we even need to worry about China in this? Its not as if ISRO is in a race with the Chinese to win a prize or anything, in any case.   Lets assume thay they do their missions at a pace that matches their requirements,  and we does as per ours.

Thats said, I do think ISRO needs to ramp up its launch capability fast (which they might be doing at the best of their abilities), but that is more in the context of meeting the requirements for heavy GEO sats.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #237 on: 02/22/2017 07:33 AM »
From the Annual Report 2016-17
Quote
Orbiter Craft
Primary structure of Orbiter Craft has been realised. Fabrication of panels is in progress. Configuration of mainframe systems and payloads was completed. Integration of mainframe systems including propulsion elements was expected to commence from December 2016. Payloads from various centres are in advanced stages of realisation and expected to be delivered in first quarter of 2017 for integration.

Lander Craft
Lander configuration is finalised to meet the soft and safe landing at the identified site. Payload configuration and interfaces with lander are finalised. Engineering models of mission critical
sensors, namely, Ka-Band Radio Altimeter (KaRA) and Lander Pattern Detection Camera (LPDC) from SAC and Laser Inertial Reference & Accelerometer Package (LIRAP) from IISU have been realised and performance tested in Lander Sensor Performance Test (LSPT), Phase-1 over artificial craters created, at Chitradurga in Karnataka. System Demonstration Module (SDM) realisation for evaluating the performance of Lander propulsion system with throttlable engines, Lander
Actuator Performance Test (LAPT) configuration and Lander electrical packages required for LAPT are in advanced stage of completion. Engineering model of Lander Leg was realised and single leg drop tests were completed. A facility has been established at Lunar Terrain Test Facility for conducting lander leg drop tests.

Rover
All the rover flight systems are in advanced stage of realisation. Soil mixing exercise is completed and the mobility test to evaluate the Rover’s wheel – soil interaction is under progress.
« Last Edit: 02/26/2017 01:02 AM by vineethgk »

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #238 on: 02/25/2017 11:49 PM »
http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2017/feb/15/chandrayaan-2-gets-russian-technology-to-analyse-lunar-surface-1570722.html

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The Russian firm, Joint Stock Company Isotope, which is part of the Russian Federation National Nuclear Corporation (ROSATOM) has supplied Radionuclide Curium (Cm-244) alpha emitter to the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad. It will help analyse lunar surface and rocks, according to ROSATOM South Asia spokesperson, Alexander Antipin.

He said the alpha emitter, manufactured by Russian State Scientific Centre-Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (JSC SSC RIAR), will be installed on Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer to help the ISRO’s lunar exploration mission.

Russia had supplied similar products to the US for the launching of three NASA expeditions -- Mars Pathfinder (1997), Opportunity (2004) and Curiosity (2012).

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #239 on: 03/01/2017 07:07 PM »
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/chandrayaan-2-to-measure-water-on-the-moon-misra/articleshow/57400214.cms

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Ahmedabad: Work on some of the critical sensors of the Chandrayaan-2 mission is nearing completion at the Space Applications Centre (SAC) and the Physical Research Laboratory (PRL).

These include three major payloads — scientific probes, crucial sensors and communication equipment that will be present in the orbiter, Lander and the Rover of the Chandrayaan-2 mission.

The latest sensors will help Isro validate, confirm and even make more crucial in-depth discoveries of the moon's topography in continuation to Chandrayaan-1 discoveries. While Chandrayaan-1 found water on the moon, SAC has mounted a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) providing L and S band readings on the Chandrayaan-2 orbiter that will help calculate the amount of water on the moon.

"The SAR through differential readings can provide us an idea of the volume of water on moon surface," said SAC director Tapan Misra on the sidelines of the National Science Day celebrations at SAC. The orbiter will also carry three separate hyperspectral cameras that will map the terrain of the moon, including providing information on the mineralogy of the moon surface.

Besides the orbiter, SAC is providing the Rover with a high definition camera and a scientific probe, developed at Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) to conduct on-site mineral investigations of the moon soil and rocks.
SAC officials claim that a new innovation onboard the Chandrayaan-2 is special radar altimeter that will help the Lander to orient itself while it lands on the moon surface safely. The same altimeter will be used for a small test flight of the human space flight mission.

The hi-tech SAC payloads will now be sent to Ahmedabad to be installed on Chnadrayaan-2 mission to carry out tests.