Author Topic: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 30 2019  (Read 165159 times)

Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #200 on: 03/28/2016 10:04 AM »
Thanks antriksh! Good to see CY2 shaping up well...

Offline Ohsin

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #201 on: 03/28/2016 11:17 AM »
There were some misunderstandings between IIT-K and ISRO about this job. Only software is relevant not hardware.
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Offline plutogno

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #202 on: 04/07/2016 09:58 AM »

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #203 on: 05/28/2016 12:18 AM »
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Chandrayaan-2, India’s second mission to the Moon, consists of an Orbiter, Lander and Rover configuration. It is totally an indigenous mission, planned to be launched by GSLV-MkII during the first quarter of 2018. A major milestone of the spacecraft level Preliminary Design Review (PDR) has been completed in the month of May 2015.

Orbiter Craft: The primary structure has been realised and delivered to the integration team for the integration with other subsystems which will begin from Dec 2015. Some of the mainframe systems are realised and some are in the Test and Evaluation phase. The Payloads are being realised at various centres and few are in an advanced stage of development. The equipment panel layouts are in the final stage of release. Interfaces between Orbiter and GSLV-Mk II has been finalised.

Lander Craft: The Lander Craft configuration has been finalised for a safe and soft landing at the identified site. The mission critical elements of sensors and actuators for a safe and soft landing are being developed at various centres. The development/qualification models are expected to be delivered in the middle of 2016. The special tests to verify the integral performance of all sensors, actuators and software in a closed loop are planned in the middle of 2016. Accommodation study of all elements has been completed. The 800 N Liquid Engines have undergone High Altitude Test (HAT) for a duration of 513 sec successfully. A Standing Technical Review committee (STRC) met and is overseeing the overall progress of the new Advanced technologies present in the lander.

Rover: The Engineering model of six wheeled rover is being realised. Navigation Camera, Inclinometer, Rover imager and mechanism hardware are ready for integration. The other systems are in the final stages of fabrication. The illumination setup for the lunar terrain test facility has been commissioned.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #204 on: 06/26/2016 06:43 PM »











Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #205 on: 08/09/2016 06:09 PM »
Hat tip: Antariksh at r/isro
« Last Edit: 08/13/2016 04:17 AM by vyoma »

Offline chota

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #206 on: 08/10/2016 08:56 PM »
 8)

From above, its now clear what will be the specific shape and outline of the Orbiter, Lander and Rover.

The rover size shown in "Open field test between lander and rover at HAL airport" image is misleading. On closer observation, looks like Rover is a cropped up image. It might be half the height of that chair.
« Last Edit: 08/10/2016 08:59 PM by chota »

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #207 on: 08/14/2016 07:44 PM »
CHACE-2 payload info from ISRO SPL 2014-25 annual report.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #208 on: 08/14/2016 07:47 PM »

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #209 on: 09/10/2016 04:09 AM »
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/road-clear-for-chandrayaan2/article9091414.ece

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The interfaces between GSLV-Mk II and Chandrayaan-2 have already been finalised, according to officials in the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

A GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 with a lander and a rover into orbit in the first quarter of 2018. It will be a totally indigenous mission — the vehicle, the spacecraft, the lander and the rover are all made in India. The orbiter (that is, the spacecraft), the lander and rover together will weigh 3,280 kg. After the spacecraft is inserted into the lunar orbit, the lander with the rover inside it will separate and land softly on the moon’s surface.

The lander will have a throttleable engine for performing a soft landing and four sites have been short-listed for this. After it touches down on a flat surface on the moon, the 25-kg rover — which is a kind of a toy car — will emerge from it. It will have six wheels, made of aluminium, to move about on the lunar soil. The wheels will interact in such a way that the rover does not sink. The rover will move at a speed of two cm a second. Its lifetime on the moon is 14 earth days; it will have two payloads for analysing the soil’s chemical properties.

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #210 on: 09/10/2016 10:44 AM »
Let me guess:

The reason why the GSLV Mk.2 is being used to launch Chandrayaan 2 instead of the PSLV-XL is because the orbiter, lander and rover are heavier than Chandrayaan 1?
« Last Edit: 09/10/2016 10:46 AM by ZachS09 »
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Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #211 on: 09/10/2016 03:56 PM »
Let me guess:

The reason why the GSLV Mk.2 is being used to launch Chandrayaan 2 instead of the PSLV-XL is because the orbiter, lander and rover are heavier than Chandrayaan 1?
Yes.

Since the total weight of the spacecraft is specified as 3.2 tonnes, I wonder what kind of orbit GSLV would initially deploy it to. Can it deploy that kind of weight to a sub-GTO, as was the case in  Chandrayaan-1?

Offline savuporo

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #212 on: 09/10/2016 05:33 PM »
A GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 with a lander and a rover into orbit in the first quarter of 2018. It will be a totally indigenous mission — the vehicle, the spacecraft, the lander and the rover are all made in India.
This is super encouraging. Had they gone with this approach from the get go, it likely would have been done by now.
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Offline sanman

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #213 on: 09/10/2016 08:54 PM »
I thought GSLV Mk-II was always the launcher envisioned for Chandrayaan-2 -- again, as you say, because of the heavier payload weight of orbiter and lander. I'd hoped that LVM3 might eventually become the launcher for that mission, but I guess it offered no advantage. (They could have made the rover bigger and included more instruments, but I guess they didn't see a need to upscale the mission)

Are they still going to do those multiple loops around the Earth with Oberth effect, or can they try for trans-lunar injection more directly?

Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #214 on: 09/28/2016 09:12 PM »
Cross posting @---'s post in GSLV cryo discussion thread

As I expected, since GSLV MK-II's Cryogenic Upper Stage does NOT have multiple restartable capability, it will launch the Chandrayaan-2 into a parking orbit similar to GTO.

Here is the report from Frontline Magazine Science Section

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G. Nagesh, Project Director, Chandrayaan-2, said the orbiter, the lander and the rover were together called the composite module. The GSLV-Mk II will first place this composite module in an orbit of 170 km by 19,500 km, called earth-parking orbit. From there, with the help of the liquid engines in the orbiter, we will take Chandrayaan-2 to the moon’s orbit of 100 km, he said. It is exactly the same as Chandrayaan-1's orbit. Once Chandrayaan-2 (that is, the composite module) is in the lunar orbit, ISRO will beam commands to it for the lander to fly out of the orbiter.


Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV

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Online worldtimedate

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #215 on: 09/29/2016 05:37 AM »
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Asked how a GSLV-Mk II vehicle could take the 3,280-kg Chandrayaan-2 into orbit when even future GSLV-Mk II rockets could carry only satellites weighing around 2,800 kg into orbit, Umamaheswaran replied that since Chandrayaan-2 would be first parked in its initial orbit of 180 km by 20,000 km, it would indeed be possible. It would be different from the GSLV-F05 mission, where the 2,211-kg INSAT-3DR had to be put into a geosynchronous transfer orbit of 170 km by 35,000 km.

Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV

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« Last Edit: 09/29/2016 05:52 AM by worldtimedate »

Online worldtimedate

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #216 on: 09/29/2016 06:20 AM »
Recent Frontline Magazine Science Section has valueable information on Chandrayaan-2 Mission.

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Ready for Chandrayaan-2

The mission's success signalled two things. One, the GSLV-Mk II with an indigenous cryogenic upper stage is "more than qualified", as M. Annadurai, Director, ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bengaluru, described it, to put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit. The other, the GSLV-Mk II rocket has become a candidate in the launch market to put the two-tonne class of satellites into orbit. It is all set to complement ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), which, with its string of 35 consecutive successes, has consolidated itself as a robust, reliable vehicle for putting small satellites into orbit.

The real significance of the GSLV-F05 mission's success is that it has cleared the road for the Chandrayaan-2 mission and boosted the morale of the Chandrayaan-2 project team at ISAC, Bengaluru. Chandrayaan-2 will be a totally indigenous mission, with the launch vehicle (GSLV-Mk II), the spacecraft, the lander and the rover, all made by ISRO.

While the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) will build the GSLV-Mk II that will put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit, teams in ISAC are busy building the orbiter, the lander and the rover.

Annadurai said: "Basically, Chandrayaan-2 calls for a GSLV. The latest [GSLV-F05] success indicates that the GSLV is also in the category of the PSLV, which has had a string of successes. It was the PSLV, its XL version, which put both Chandrayaan-1 and our spacecraft to Mars into orbit. Thus, the PSLV played a major role in the successes of both Chandrayaan-1 and our Mars spacecraft missions. Similarly, the GSLV-F05 mission's success gives us the confidence that a GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit. The GSLV-F05's triumph will galvanise us to realise the Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft, the lander and rover at the earliest so that we can aim for a lift-off by 2017-end from Sriharikota."

Teams are working in full swing at ISAC to realise the orbiter, lander and rover. The interfaces between the orbiter and the GSLV-Mk II have been finalised and the rover's engineering model is ready. The rover will have six wheels made of aluminium, a navigation camera and an inclinometer. The orbiter, the lander and the rover together weigh 3,280 kg; the rover weighs 25 kg and the lander 935 kg.

G. Nagesh, Project Director, Chandrayaan-2, said the orbiter, the lander and the rover were together called the composite module. The GSLV-Mk II will first place this composite module in an orbit of 170 km by 19,500 km, called earth-parking orbit. "From there, with the help of the liquid engines in the orbiter, we will take Chandrayaan-2 to the moon's orbit of 100 km," he said. It is exactly the same as Chandrayaan-1's orbit. Once Chandrayaan-2 (that is, the composite module) is in the lunar orbit, ISRO will beam commands to it for the lander to fly out of the orbiter. This will happen at an identified time, depending on the Sun-Moon-Earth gravity. The lander has a pyramidal structure.

"The lander will land at an identified site on the moon. Once the lander touches down, a ramp will deploy and the rover will come out, rolling down the ramp. Both the lander and the rover will perform experiments on the moon," said Nagesh.

Annadurai said that for the lander to make a soft landing on the lunar soil, matching the lunar gravity, it needs to have throttle-able engines. "This is a major technology. Over and above that, the lander should do in-place navigation and [be able to] find hazards. In case of hazards, it should go around and land [in a suitable] place. These two things are new to us," he said.

The rover will roll down a ramp from the lander on six aluminium wheels which should interact properly. "If they don't interact properly, there is a possibility that the rover will sink into the lunar soil," Annadurai said. The rover has batteries which are charged by solar panels. Each wheel will be driven by a motor. "This is what makes the rover move forward and backward. We use the principle of skid-steering to enable the rover to take turns, negotiate hazards, etc.," he said.

The rover will move at a speed of one to two cm a second. After it traverses a distance of say, five metres, the navigation cameras on board will take pictures of the lunar surface and the images will be sent to the ground. Annadurai said, "We will analyse the [best] path to follow and direct this command [to the rover] to move on that path." The rover will do all the operations during the lunar day. Its life is one lunar day, or 14 earth days. It has two payloads to analyse the chemical properties of the lunar soil.

The lander will perform three experiments: analyse seismic activity on the moon's surface; measure plasma and electron content on the lunar surface; and study temperatures below the moon's soil. The orbiter, from its perch in the lunar orbit, will do mineralogical mapping of the moon's soil.

Asked how a GSLV-Mk II vehicle could take the 3,280-kg Chandrayaan-2 into orbit when even future GSLV-Mk II rockets could carry only satellites weighing around 2,800 kg into orbit, Umamaheswaran replied that since Chandrayaan-2 would be first parked in its initial orbit of 180 km by 20,000 km, it would indeed be possible. It would be different from the GSLV-F05 mission, where the 2,211-kg INSAT-3DR had to be put into a geosynchronous transfer orbit of 170 km by 35,000 km.

Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV

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Offline vineethgk

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #217 on: 10/06/2016 09:07 PM »
ISRO to pratice Moon Landing in ‘no-fly zone’ in Bengaluru for Chandrayaan-II mission
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In order to help Indian space scientists overcome the challenges of landing on Moon and Mars, researchers will fly a small aircraft breaching the ‘no fly zone’ rules over Bengaluru. What’s striking is that the aircraft will carry a special payload of country’s second lunar mission — Chandrayaan-II. The aircraft will drop the payload over a scooped out area in order to mimic lunar surface with large craters and check whether the scientists can successfully touch down the surface.
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“This is the first time we are going to attempt to land on the Moon, so we want to be meticulous with our computation and technology,” said officials from ISRO. The lunar rover will monitor surface of Moon and it will rely on the Orbiter High Resolution Camera (OHRC) for accurate inputs. The rover weighs 20kg and harnesses the power from Sun.
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Space scientists said the orbiter would circle the Moon at an altitude of 100 km with five instruments onboard. Three of these would be new, while two others would be improved versions of ones flown onboard Chandrayaan-I. The orbiter would help beam scientific data garnered by the rover from the Moon’s soil.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #218 on: 10/09/2016 01:11 AM »
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Visakhapatnam/isro-bracing-to-deploy-rover-on-lunar-surface/article9203827.ece

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India is getting ready to deploy an indigenously developed rover on the lunar surface for on-site analysis of various samples and relay them to the earth station.

Senior ISRO scientist and Deputy Director of Satish Dhawan Space Centre V. Ranganathan told The Hindu on Saturday that they were in advance stages of deploying the rover. The timing of its launch is not yet finalised.

Chandrayaan-II Mission includes launching of lunar explorations by geosynchronous launch vehicles (GSLV Mk-II) with clinical precision. The wheeled rover would be useful in using multiple applications by collecting soil and rock sediments for on-site analysis and transmitting the findings to the earth station.

Online worldtimedate

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Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #219 on: 10/15/2016 05:15 AM »
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He added that various tests related to Chandrayan 2 mission is under progress and it is expected to take place by the end of next year, while another planetary mission Aditya to study Sun is expected in 2018.

For Chandrayan 2, tests on controls over the lander and rover while landing on moon are to be tested by the end of this year and the early next year. Many of the activities are supported by student groups.

Source : Isro looking at putting a telescope on moon, says A S Kiran Kumar

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