Author Topic: Chandrayaan-2 Mission - Launch and Landing Coverage  (Read 479680 times)

Offline hornbill2007

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #680 on: 07/22/2019 09:49 am »
congrats isro, scientists and technicians, past and present who worked on the mission.

Offline NancyV

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #681 on: 07/22/2019 09:50 am »
They burned the stage to depletion rather than the usual launch sequence, where the closed loop guidance system shuts the engine off when the intended orbital parameters have been achieved.

Same thing as the first Falcon Heavy launch.

That was awesome to watch!  The Chairman looked pleased as punch.

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #682 on: 07/22/2019 09:52 am »
Congrats to ISRO for a successful launch!

Offline seshagirib

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #683 on: 07/22/2019 09:52 am »

Looks to me like a slight under performance  of the cryo stage towards the end of the burn. Which was more than offset by
 burning to depletion ( longer duration burn).

Offline starbase

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #684 on: 07/22/2019 10:02 am »
Upcoming events as announced on the webcast (hopefully all understood correctly):

-) 6 orbit raising burns at perigee 3, 4, 6, 11, 16, 19 (orbit changes to: 47000km apogee, 243km perigee, 55800km apogee, 71500km apogee, 89700km apogee)

-) Aug. 14 TLI burn at perigee 22

-) Aug. 20 arrival initial lunar orbit (120km x 18000km)

-) Late August - 4 perilune braking burns

-) Sep. 1 arrival final lunar orbit (100 x 100km)

-) Early September - separation lander/rover (orbit change to 30 x 100km)

-) Sep. 6 - 21:28 UTC landing (Sep. 7 - 2:58am IST)
bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Offline whiztech

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #685 on: 07/22/2019 10:44 am »
2 objects


Quote
1 44441U 19042A   19203.40693672 -.00010969  68193-4  00000+0 0  9991
2 44441  21.3772  17.7365 7761146 178.4611   7.5305  1.75640648    01

45,124.3 km x 151.3 km, 21.37º


Quote
1 44442U 19042B   19203.40872376 -.00001563  17283-5  00000+0 0  9997
2 44442  21.4253  18.0300 7739947 178.5988   8.7184  1.77127690    09

44,733.6 km x 173.7 km, 21.41º

edit: 2nd object
« Last Edit: 07/22/2019 11:07 am by whiztech »

Offline lamid

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #686 on: 07/22/2019 11:08 am »
 https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi#results  new data:
ch2l_spk_190722-191231_planning_v1.V0.1 2019-Jul-22 09:30 2019-Dec-31

Offline nbharatwaj

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #687 on: 07/22/2019 12:37 pm »
Thanks for all these great screenshots, Steve - you always capture the right moments  :)

Offline K210

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Offline VIKINGirl

Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #689 on: 07/22/2019 01:47 pm »
Its FIRST mission to go to Moon South Pole right ? Then why wikipedia says Chinese landed there first ?

As far as i know Chinese landed around 45 degree latitude not at 90 and Indians are clearly going to land at around 70 altitude so why Wikipedia says Chinese landed First near South Pole ?

NASA's Surveyor landed at 40-41 degree latitude so by that logic US landed near South Pole first ?

Offline PM3

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #690 on: 07/22/2019 02:20 pm »
Its FIRST mission to go to Moon South Pole right ? Then why wikipedia says Chinese landed there first ?

fixed

Probably a misunderstanding of the term "South Pole–Aitken basin", which includes both, the Chang'e 4 landing site and the south pole.
« Last Edit: 07/22/2019 02:22 pm by PM3 »
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #691 on: 07/22/2019 02:48 pm »
Does NASA's Deep Space Network participate in this mission in a supporting role?

I know they participate in JAXA Hayabusa2 mission even though JAXA has deep space stations. The DSN also supports ESA  even though it also has deep space stations.

Have never seen info one way or the other for Indian missions.

Thanks

Yes they do. See https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=20324.msg1965660#msg1965660

NASA DSN supports the launch!

https://twitter.com/nascom1/status/1153235287595610112

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #692 on: 07/22/2019 02:55 pm »
Jul 22, 2019

GSLV MkIII-M1 Successfully Launches Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle GSLV MkIII-M1, successfully launched the 3840 kg Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft into an earth orbit today (July 22, 2019). The spacecraft is now revolving round the earth with a perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 169.7 km and an apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 45,475 km.  Today’s flight marks the first operational flight of the GSLV Mk III.

After a smooth countdown lasting 20 hours, GSLV MkIII-M1 vehicle majestically lifted off from the Second Launch Pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR (SDSC SHAR), Sriharikota at the scheduled launch time of 1443Hrs (2:43 pm) Indian Standard Time (IST) with the ignition of its two S200 solid strap-on motors.  All the subsequent flight events occurred as scheduled.

About 16 minutes 14 seconds after lift-off, the vehicle injected Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft into an elliptical earth orbit. Immediately after spacecraft separation from the vehicle, the solar array of the spacecraft automatically got deployed and ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC), Bengaluru successfully took control of the spacecraft.

ISRO Chairman Dr K Sivan congratulated the launch vehicle and satellite teams involved in this challenging mission. “Today is a historical day for Space Science and Technology in India. I am extremely happy to announce that GSLV MkIII-M1 successfully injected Chandrayaan-2 into an orbit of 6000 Km more than the intended orbit and is better.”

“Today is the beginning of the historical journey of India towards Moon and to land at a place near south pole to carry out scientific experiments to explore the unexplored. On July 15, 2019 ISRO intelligently observed a technical snag, Team ISRO worked out, fixed and corrected the snag within 24 hours. For the next one and a half day, the required tests were conducted to ensure that corrections made were proper and in right direction. Today ISRO bounced back with flying colours.” Dr. Sivan said.

In the coming days, a series of orbit manoeuvres will be carried out using Chandrayaan-2’s onboard propulsion system.  This will raise the spacecraft orbit in steps and then place it in the Lunar Transfer Trajectory to enable the spacecraft to travel to the vicinity of the Moon.

GSLV Mk III is a three-stage launch vehicle developed by ISRO. The vehicle has two solid strap-ons, a core liquid booster and a cryogenic upper stage. The vehicle is designed to carry 4 ton class of satellites into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) or about 10 tons to Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

Chandrayaan-2 is India's second mission to the moon. It comprises a fully indigenous Orbiter, Lander (Vikram) and Rover (Pragyan). The Rover Pragyan is housed inside Vikram lander.

The mission objective of Chandrayaan-2 is to develop and demonstrate the key technologies for end-to-end lunar mission capability, including soft-landing and roving on the lunar surface. On the science front, this mission aims to further expand our knowledge about the Moon through a detailed study of its topography, mineralogy, surface chemical composition, thermo-physical characteristics and atmosphere leading to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon.

After leaving earth orbit and on entering Moon's sphere of influence, the on-board propulsion system of Chandrayaan-2 will be fired to slow down the spacecraft. This will enable it to be captured into a preliminary orbit around the Moon. Later, through a set of manoeuvres, the orbit of Chandrayaan-2 around the moon will be circularised at 100 km height from the lunar surface.

Subsequently, the lander will separate from the Orbiter and enters into a 100 km X 30 km orbit around the Moon.  Then, it will perform a series of complex braking maneuvers to soft land in the South polar region of the Moon on September 7, 2019.

Following this, the Rover will roll out from the lander and carries out experiments on the lunar surface for a period of 1 lunar day, which is equal to 14 Earth days. The mission life of the lander is also 1 lunar day.The Orbiter will continue its mission for a duration of one year.

The orbiter had a lift-off weight of about 2,369 kg, while the lander and rover weighed 1,477 kg and 26 kg respectively.  The rover can travel up to 500 m (half a kilometre) and relies on electric power generated by its solar panel for functioning.

Chandrayaan-2 has several science payloads to facilitate a more detailed understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon. The Orbiter carries eight payloads, the lander carries three, and the rover carries two.  Besides, a passive experiment is included on the lander.The Orbiter payloads will conduct remote-sensing observations from a 100 km orbit while the Lander and Rover payloads will perform in-situ measurements near the landing site.

The ground facilities constitute the third vital element of Chandrayaan-2mission.  They perform the important task of receiving the health information as well as the scientific data from the spacecraft. They also transmit the radio commands to the spacecraft. The Ground Segment of Chandrayaan-2 consists of Indian Deep Space Network, Spacecraft Control Centre and Indian Space Science Data Centre.

Today’s successful launch of Chandrayaan-2 is a significant milestone in this challenging mission. A total number of 7500 visitors witnessed the launch live from the Viewer’s Gallery at Sriharikota.

https://www.isro.gov.in/update/22-jul-2019/gslv-mkiii-m1-successfully-launches-chandrayaan-2-spacecraft

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #693 on: 07/22/2019 02:57 pm »

Offline Norm38

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #694 on: 07/22/2019 03:14 pm »
I have not followed this at all but I wish them luck and congratulate them on the launch.

Are they aiming for a crater or feature where ice has been spotted?  I hope they find ice, lots of it.

Offline vyoma

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Offline isro-watch

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #696 on: 07/22/2019 04:18 pm »
I have not followed this at all but I wish them luck and congratulate them on the launch.

Are they aiming for a crater or feature where ice has been spotted?  I hope they find ice, lots of it.

The lander and the rover will land in a high plain between two craters, Manzinus C and Simpelius N, at a latitude of about 70° south. Both the craters are suspected to contain water.

Offline rpapo

Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #697 on: 07/22/2019 04:24 pm »
From Google Earth, Lunar view.
An Apollo fanboy . . . fifty years ago.

Offline VIKINGirl

Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #698 on: 07/22/2019 06:44 pm »
Can someone change Wikipedia article on 'Chandrayaan-2' . It keeps saying Chinese mission is First to land on Lunar South Pole but in reality it landed far from the South Pole .  :o

Offline Sridhar

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII - July 22 2019 (09:13UTC)
« Reply #699 on: 07/22/2019 07:15 pm »
Technically, Chandrayaan-2 is not landing in the lunar polar region thought ISRO keeps claiming so. 70 degrees south in not what is typically considered polar region (80 degrees onwards is). That said, it is landing closer to the pole than any other lander.   
« Last Edit: 07/22/2019 07:21 pm by Sridhar »

 

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