Author Topic: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates  (Read 61136 times)

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #100 on: 03/21/2018 09:03 pm »
http://sci.esa.int/cosmic-vision/59796-esa-s-next-science-mission-to-focus-on-nature-of-exoplanets/

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ARIEL, the Atmospheric Remote‐sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large‐survey mission, was selected by ESA today as part of its Cosmic Vision plan.

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ARIEL's metre-class telescope will operate at visible and infrared wavelengths. It will be launched on ESA's new Ariane 6 rocket from Europe's spaceport in Kourou in mid 2028. It will operate from an orbit around the second Lagrange point, L2, 1.5 million kilometres directly 'behind' Earth as viewed from the Sun, on an initial four-year mission.

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ARIEL was chosen from three candidates, competing against the space plasma physics mission THOR (Turbulence Heating ObserveR) and the high-energy astrophysics mission XIPE (X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer).

NSF thread: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45277.0

Offline Star One

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #101 on: 03/22/2018 07:43 pm »
SN article with additional quotage.

Exoplanet telescope selected as ESA’s next space science mission

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A mission to investigate the atmospheres of planets around other stars has been selected by the European Space Agency for launch in the late 2020s, officials announced this week.

The space telescope will observe 1,000 exoplanets, using a spectrometer to measure the chemical make-up of their atmospheres. Astronomers want to learn about the chemistry of exoplanet atmospheres to study how the distant worlds formed, knowledge that could put our solar system in context in the cosmos.

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“It is thanks to the world-leading skills of our innovative space community that a UK-led consortium has been chosen to take forward the next ESA science mission. This demonstrates what a vital role we continue to play in European collaboration on research in space,” said Graham Turnock, chief executive of the UK Space Agency.

“The ARIEL mission is a prime example of the scientific innovation underpinning the wider economy. It relies on the UK’s science and engineering expertise, which are at the forefront of the government’s Industrial Strategy.”

https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/03/22/exoplanet-telescope-selected-as-esas-next-space-science-mission/

Offline Archibald

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #102 on: 05/05/2018 07:34 am »
per lack of better thread (and after a thorough search)

Can somebody explain why was SIM-lite abandonned ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Interferometry_Mission

Is there something wrong with astrometry as a whole, at least for exoplanet hunting ? (van de Kemp legacy ?)

Too expensive ? immature technology ? planetary transits worked better ?  something else ? 

Thank you in advance !
...you have been found guilty by the elders of the forum of a (imaginary) vendetta against Saint Elon - BLAAASPHEMER !

Offline Hungry4info3

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #103 on: 05/05/2018 11:45 am »
There's nothing wrong with astrometry. Extrasolar planets have been detected that way and we expect Gaia to find several (thousands?) in DR5. My understanding is that SIM-Lite was cancelled largely because of budget problems (Wikipedia link). Though of course this was at a time where the usefulness of transits to detect extrasolar planets had not yet been fully revealed.

Offline Alpha_Centauri

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #104 on: 05/05/2018 12:36 pm »
IIRC up to the cancellation there was a long period of infighting within the exoplanet community about what missions/methods to suppprt.  I remember watching a talk someone gave with a cartoon of a circular firing squad representing the result.  If there isn't broad community support, as indicated by the White Paper submissions to the Decadal, it's relatively easy to pull the plug in favour of missions scientists are agreed they want.

Online jebbo

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #105 on: 05/08/2018 06:56 am »
The SIM stuff really should be in a *NASA* thread ...

On finding exoplanets with Gaia astrometry, the expect yield of Jovian planets in DR5 is >20,000!

--- Tony

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA's M-class Cosmic Vision candidates
« Reply #106 on: 05/08/2018 12:22 pm »
ESA selects three new mission concepts for study (M5)

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ESA_selects_three_new_mission_concepts_for_study

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A high-energy survey of the early Universe, an infrared observatory to study the formation of stars, planets and galaxies, and a Venus orbiter are to be considered for ESA’s fifth medium class mission in its Cosmic Vision science programme, with a planned launch date in 2032.

The three candidates, the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (Theseus), the SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (Spica), and the EnVision mission to Venus were selected from 25 proposals put forward by the scientific community.

Theseus, Spica and EnVision will be studied in parallel and a final decision is expected in 2021.

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Theseus is a novel mission to monitor transient events in the high-energy Universe across the whole sky and over the entirety of cosmic history. In particular, it promises to make a complete census of gamma-ray bursts from the Universe’s first billion years, to help shed light on the life cycle of the first stars.

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Spica, a joint European-Japanese project that offers significant improvement in far-infrared spectroscopic and survey capabilities over NASA’s Spitzer and ESA’s Herschel space observatories, would ensure continuing advances can be made in this field.

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EnVision follows on from ESA’s highly successful Venus Express that focused primarily on atmospheric research. Planned to be implemented with NASA participation, next-generation EnVision would determine the nature and current state of geological activity on Venus and its relationship with the atmosphere, to better understand the different evolutionary pathways of the two planets.

It would map the surface and obtain detailed radar images, improving on those obtained by NASA’s Magellan in the 1990s to provide greater insight into the geological evolution of the surface.


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