Author Topic: STS, EELV, the Florida Economy and 2012  (Read 4903 times)

Offline Xplor

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Re: STS, EELV, the Florida Economy and 2012
« Reply #20 on: 09/19/2009 01:08 PM »
KSC has a lot of jobs beyond turning around the shuttle, such as processing of the payloads and launching the ELVs.

Sadly, Griffin decided to out source a lot of this processing to Russia, Europe and Japan.  Ares I/Orion were never going to make the 2012 initial launch date, reference immediate renegotiation of Orion contract on award, and are likely to slip well beyond 2015.  CxPs delayed schedule was always going to result in mass layoffs at the Cape during the interim between shuttle and Ares.

Reinvigorating the commercial space access for both crew as well as cargo has the opportunity of helping the space port transition from shuttle to the new space economy.  While this wont replace jobs 1 for 1 with shuttle it will enable the return of the jobs sent overseas, it will result in a much more efficient industry, better able to compete for commercial jobs and possibly enable the new space industries such as tourism and commercial space stations.

Retirement of Shuttle in 2010 will be painful, but aggressive NASA and White House leadership can help reinvigorate the space port by 2012 and even more beyond.

Offline Arthur

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Re: STS, EELV, the Florida Economy and 2012
« Reply #21 on: 09/19/2009 01:15 PM »
Wrong,

1. there is more to KSC and CCAFS than shuttle
2.  KSC still remains open without shuttle
Good to hear.
Will the other activities support the majority of the 30,000 Aerospace Indistry workers in the state, or are you splitting hairs between 'closing' and a 300 person regional workforce?

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3.  Florida is not struggling
4.  The area has already weathered two turndowns in the space program (post Apollo and Challenger) with no effect on the political landscape

If Brevard County is indeed not struggling, then you should feel fortunate. I am employed in Architecture, Engineering and Land Planning throughout the state and the Southeastern US. Our sphere of influence is struggling greatly.

In the Florida Suncoast, where we are located, our no. 1 competitor, a 100 person AE firm reduced its staff to 3 early this year. Within the last 30 days, a 400 person Architectural giant has closed its doors for good.

Eighteen months ago, we had a 2+ year que of work with 75% of our business in Commercial Development and 25% in Government Projects (as a hedge in case of a recession). Today over 90% of our revenue is from Government projects and we have only 1 commercial client still building.

A typical jobsite would employ about about 20 subcontractors actually working at one time, today they have 70 to 90 people working on any given day. Our projects are the only source of work for several General Contractors and many subcontractors.

Local house forclosures still continue with liquidation sale prices in the $36,000 to $50,000 range and many vacant properties. Local government is cutting like crazy to maintain essential services (police, fire, teachers).

That represents a lot of unemployed Engineers and Architects, a lot of people looking hard at cutting their losses and walking away, and a lot of construction workers who have already fled the state looking for work elsewhere.

Your post Apollo/Challenger analogy is flawed.
Was the unemployment across the whole state already over 11 percent and climbing?

The 1932 election after the 1929 Stock Market Crash, or the Gubernatorial Elections in New York or California following those regions historic government "bankrupcies" would be a better example.
« Last Edit: 09/19/2009 01:27 PM by Arthur »

Offline khallow

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Re: STS, EELV, the Florida Economy and 2012
« Reply #22 on: 09/19/2009 02:31 PM »

If Brevard County is indeed not struggling, then you should feel fortunate. I am employed in Architecture, Engineering and Land Planning throughout the state and the Southeastern US. Our sphere of influence is struggling greatly.

No offense, but you are ground zero for the current recession and are in a sector that was vastly overbuilt. The hardships you experience are not typical.

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Your post Apollo/Challenger analogy is flawed.
Was the unemployment across the whole state already over 11 percent and climbing?

After Apollo, unemployment was pretty high. At a glance, Florida had 9.7% unemployment in January, 1976 according to the US Bureau of Labor (and I can't tell how much higher it might have gotten since the history chart starts then).
Karl Hallowell

Offline K466

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Re: STS, EELV, the Florida Economy and 2012
« Reply #23 on: 09/22/2009 10:15 PM »
Good post Arthur. Its a complex issue for sure.
""There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil, to one who is striking at the root."" ~Henry David Thoreau

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