Author Topic: NASA - Cassini updates  (Read 263122 times)


Offline Targeteer

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« Last Edit: 04/05/2016 12:25 AM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline corrodedNut

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #462 on: 04/16/2016 01:32 AM »
Extra terrestrial!

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/newsreleases/newsrelease20160414/

"NASA's Cassini spacecraft has detected the faint but distinct signature of dust coming from beyond our solar system. The research, led by a team of Cassini scientists primarily from Europe, is published this week in the journal Science."

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #463 on: 04/17/2016 07:45 AM »
Extra terrestrial!

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/newsreleases/newsrelease20160414/

"NASA's Cassini spacecraft has detected the faint but distinct signature of dust coming from beyond our solar system. The research, led by a team of Cassini scientists primarily from Europe, is published this week in the journal Science."
Cassini must have a claim to be now the most scientifically productive interplanetary mission.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #464 on: 04/17/2016 04:24 PM »
Extra terrestrial!

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/newsreleases/newsrelease20160414/

"NASA's Cassini spacecraft has detected the faint but distinct signature of dust coming from beyond our solar system. The research, led by a team of Cassini scientists primarily from Europe, is published this week in the journal Science."
Cassini must have a claim to be now the most scientifically productive interplanetary mission.
Depends on how you measure productivity. Voyager 2 has a pretty good claim.

Offline notsorandom

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #465 on: 04/18/2016 01:25 PM »
If measuring productivity as the number of new and interesting things discovered Voyager 2 is likely the king. However if looking at the number of bytes returned then Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is far out ahead. As of November 2016 it had returned 33 terabytes. Though Cassini is not slacking off having returned 444 gigabytes as of Oct. 2012.

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #466 on: 04/19/2016 01:51 PM »
Y Marks the Spot


This view looks towards the trailing hemisphere of Enceladus. North is up. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 15, 2016.

The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 60,000 miles (100,000 kilometers) from Enceladus. Image scale is 1,900 feet (580 meters) per pixel.

The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Last Updated: April 18, 2016
Editor: Tony Greicius

http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/pia18366/y-marks-the-spot

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #467 on: 04/21/2016 09:21 PM »
Cassini Ring Dive Ride Along

NASASolarSystem

Published on Apr 21, 2016
This computer-generated view shows the view from the perspective of the Cassini spacecraft as it dives between the rings and Saturn's cloud tops.

YouTube Video Location: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=UlQEiROhBFM

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #468 on: 04/21/2016 09:23 PM »
Cassini's Final Orbits

NASASolarSystem

Published on Apr 21, 2016
A navigation team animation showing Cassini's final 22 orbits at Saturn in 2017.

YouTube Video Location: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Mkj3Gvfp8PA

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #469 on: 04/21/2016 09:24 PM »
Cassini Tour Beginning

NASASolarSystem

Published on Apr 21, 2016
This animation shows the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft being captured in orbit at Saturn in 2004.

YouTube Video Location: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Bupdt_LpMYA

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Offline ugordan

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #470 on: 04/22/2016 01:08 PM »
Quote
It's official. Countdown clock for Cassini's Plunge into Saturn installed in the darkroom @NASAJPL @CassiniSaturn

https://twitter.com/RonBaalke/status/723215788090380289

I knew this was coming for a long time, but it's still quite depressing to actually see it happening.

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #471 on: 04/28/2016 04:13 PM »
« Last Edit: 04/28/2016 04:14 PM by Star One »

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #472 on: 05/06/2016 07:13 PM »
Stellar Occultation Offers New Insights on Enceladus’ Geysers
May 6, 2016
 
Tucson, Ariz. -- The Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn, viewed a bright star passing behind a plume of gas and dust spewing from Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Cassini, using its Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), was able to measure the amount of water vapor erupting from Enceladus, offering new insights on geologic activity beneath the moon’s surface.
 
“This new data is very important to our understanding of the ‘plumbing’ of the water conduits below the surface of Enceladus that connect the water vapor eruption to the reservoir of water below the surface,” said Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Candice Hansen.
 
Earlier data from Cassini showed that Enceladus continuously spews out a broad geyser of gas and dust-sized grains, originating from the moon’s subsurface ocean of salty liquid water. The plume, originating from the region around the moon’s south pole and extending hundreds of miles into space, is more than 90 percent water vapor.
 
Other instruments on the Cassini spacecraft have observed that the number of water ice grains being ejected from the small moon was three times greater when Enceladus was farthest from Saturn compared to when it was closest in its elliptical orbit. This was Cassini’s first opportunity to see if the amount of gas that propels the particles from fissures (called tiger stripes) across Enceladus’ south pole also changes with its orbital position.
 
“The UVIS team did not find the total number of water molecules to be the predicted two times higher; rather, it is only approximately 20 percent greater,” said Hansen, a UVIS team member. “We went after the most obvious explanation first, but the data told us we needed to look deeper at what was happening closer to the moon’s surface.”
 
Hansen and her team focused their attention on one supersonic jet known informally as “Baghdad I.” The researchers found while the amount of gas in the overall plume did not change much, this particular jet was four times more active than previously observed during other times in Enceladus’ orbit. Instead of providing just 2 percent of the plume’s total water vapor, as Cassini had previously observed, it was at this time supplying 8 percent of the plume’s gas.
 
The increase in the jet’s activity is what causes more icy dust grains to be lofted into space, with the jets that lift the observed ice grains much stronger when Enceladus is farthest from Saturn.
 
“How do the tiger stripe fissures respond to the push and pull of tidal forces as Enceladus goes around its orbit to explain this difference?  We now have new clues!” Hansen said. “It may be that the individual jet sources along the tiger stripes have a particular shape or width that responds most strongly to the tidal forcing each orbit to boost more ice grains at this orbital longitude.”
 
Hansen’s work was supported by the Cassini Mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency.
 
Visit http://www.psi.edu/news/geysers to see images illustrating the research.

http://www.psi.edu/news/geyser

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #473 on: 06/22/2016 07:12 PM »
An Ocean lies a few kilometers beneath Saturn's moon Enceladus's icy surface

Summary:
With eruptions of ice and water vapor, and an ocean covered by an ice shell, Saturn's moon Enceladus is one of the most fascinating in the Solar System, especially as interpretations of data provided by the Cassini spacecraft have been contradictory until now. Astronomers recently proposed a new model that reconciles different data sets and shows that the ice shell at Enceladus's south pole may be only a few kilometers thick. This suggests that there is a strong heat source in the interior of Enceladus, an additional factor supporting the possible emergence of life in its ocean.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160621115743.htm

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #474 on: 08/10/2016 07:41 PM »
Cassini finds flooded canyons on Saturn’s moon Titan

Quote
NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has found deep, steep-sided canyons on Saturn’s moon Titan that are flooded with liquid hydrocarbons. The finding represents the first direct evidence of the presence of liquid-filled channels on Titan, as well as the first observation of canyons hundreds of metres deep.
A new paper in the journal Geophysical Research Letters describes how scientists analysed Cassini data from a close pass the spacecraft made over Titan in May 2013. During the flyby, Cassini’s radar instrument focused on channels that branch out from the large, northern sea Ligeia Mare.

The Cassini observations reveal that the channels — in particular, a network of them named Vid Flumina — are narrow canyons, generally less than half a mile (a bit less than a kilometre) wide, with slopes steeper than 40 degrees. The canyons also are quite deep — those measured are 790 to 1,870 feet (240 to 570 metres) from top to bottom.

https://astronomynow.com/2016/08/10/cassini-finds-flooded-canyons-on-saturns-moon-titan/

Here's the paper.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL069679/full

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #475 on: 08/11/2016 01:43 AM »
same info but from JPL...

Cassini Finds Flooded Canyons on Titan

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6589
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Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #476 on: 09/07/2016 07:07 PM »
Dunes and Other Features Emerge in New Images

By Preston Dyches, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

New scenes from a frigid alien landscape are coming to light in recent radar images of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Cassini obtained the views during a close flyby of Titan on July 25, when the spacecraft came as close as 607 miles (976 kilometers) from the giant moon. The spacecraft's radar instrument is able to penetrate the dense, global haze that surrounds Titan, to reveal fine details on the surface.

One of the new views (along with a short video) shows long, linear dunes, thought to be comprised of grains derived from hydrocarbons that have settled out of Titan's atmosphere. Cassini has shown that dunes of this sort encircle most of Titan's equator. Scientists can use the dunes to learn about winds, the sands they're composed of, and highs and lows in the landscape.

"Dunes are dynamic features. They're deflected by obstacles along the downwind path, often making beautiful, undulating patterns," said Jani Radebaugh, a Cassini radar team associate at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Another new image shows an area nicknamed the "Xanadu annex" earlier in the mission by members of the Cassini radar team. Cassini's radar had not previously obtained images of this area, but earlier measurements by the spacecraft suggested the terrain might be quite similar to the large region on Titan named Xanadu.

First imaged in 1994 by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, Xanadu was the first surface feature to be recognized on Titan. While Hubble was able to see Xanadu's outline, the annex area went unnoticed.

The new Cassini image reveals that the Xanadu annex is, indeed, made up of the same type of mountainous terrains observed in Xanadu and scattered across other parts of Titan.

This 'annex' looks quite similar to Xanadu using our radar, but there seems to be something different about the surface there that masks this similarity when observing at other wavelengths, as with Hubble," said Mike Janssen, also a JPL member of the radar team. "It's an interesting puzzle."

Xanadu -- and now its annex -- remains something of a mystery. Elsewhere on Titan, mountainous terrain appears in small, isolated patches, but Xanadu covers a large area, and scientists have proposed a variety of theories about its formation.

"These mountainous areas appear to be the oldest terrains on Titan, probably remnants of the icy crust before it was covered by organic sediments from the atmosphere," said Rosaly Lopes, a Cassini radar team member at JPL. "Hiking in these rugged landscapes would likely be similar to hiking in the Badlands of South Dakota."

The July 25 flyby was Cassini's 122nd encounter with Titan since the spacecraft's arrival in the Saturn system in mid-2004. It was also the last time Cassini's radar will image terrain in the far southern latitudes of Titan.

"If Cassini were orbiting Earth instead of Saturn, this would be like getting our last close view of Australia," said Stephen Wall, deputy lead of the Cassini radar team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Cassini's four remaining Titan flybys will focus primarily on the liquid-filled lakes and seas in Titan's far north. The mission will begin its finale in April 2017, with a series of 22 orbits that plunge between the planet and its icy rings.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed, developed and assembled the Cassini orbiter. The radar instrument was built by JPL and the Italian Space Agency, working with team members from the U.S. and several European countries.

More information about Cassini:

http://www.nasa.gov/cassini

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov

https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/2933/titans-dunes-and-other-features-emerge-in-new-images/
« Last Edit: 09/07/2016 07:08 PM by Star One »

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #477 on: 09/08/2016 05:33 AM »
a video for the above....

Dunes of Shangri-La on Saturn's Moon Titan

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Published on Sep 7, 2016
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has radar vision that allows it to peer through the haze that surrounds Saturn's largest moon, Titan. This video focuses on Shangri-la, a large, dark area on Titan filled with dunes. The long, linear dunes are thought to be comprised of grains derived from hydrocarbons that have settled out of Titan's atmosphere. Cassini has shown that dunes of this sort encircle most of Titan's equator. Scientists can use the dunes to learn about winds, the sands they're composed of, and highs and lows in the landscape.

The radar image was obtained by the Cassini Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) on July 25, 2016, during the mission's 122nd targeted Titan encounter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0RbbNb8Pns?t=001

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #478 on: 09/16/2016 12:29 AM »
Four Days at Saturn

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Published on Sep 15, 2016
NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared at Saturn for nearly 44 hours in April 2016 to obtain this movie showing four Saturn days.

Cassini will begin a series of dives between the planet and its rings in April 2017, building toward a dramatic end of mission -- a final plunge into the planet, six months later.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/cassini.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqXcXNUu1lg?t=001

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Re: NASA - Cassini updates
« Reply #479 on: 09/21/2016 12:13 AM »
NASA Scientists Find 'Impossible' Cloud on Titan -- Again

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6625

Quote
The puzzling appearance of an ice cloud seemingly out of thin air has prompted NASA scientists to suggest that a different process than previously thought -- possibly similar to one seen over Earth's poles -- could be forming clouds on Saturn's moon Titan.
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