Author Topic: Superb images  (Read 14202 times)

Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #40 on: 03/11/2006 01:36 AM »
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rsp1202 - 10/3/2006  7:55 PM


Mars Global Surveyor snapshots its cousin, Mars Odyssey, in martian orbit:

great pic, I think spacecraft photos look great

Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #41 on: 03/11/2006 01:39 AM »
The MERs by JPL were an unmanned Mars exploration mission that sent two robotic rovers to the red planet named Spirit and Opportunity

The Squyres Rovers were launched by Boeing Delta II vehicle


Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #42 on: 03/11/2006 01:44 AM »
The Vikings were also two unmanned space missions to Mars, each Viking ( 1 & 2 ) consisted of both an orbiter and lander

they were lauched atop of the Titan-Centaur rockets

Here is a photo of Sagan standing next to the design of the Viking lander




Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #43 on: 03/11/2006 01:50 AM »
XMM-Newton is one of ESA's most important space observatories,

it is an observatory that look at the universe in X-ray waveleghts.


The telescope XmmNewton helped NASA's Deep Impact mission when it detected water on Tempel 1 during the observations of the impact.

the telescope was launched by Ariane-5 at Kourou in French Guiana


Offline Rocket Guy

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #44 on: 03/11/2006 01:50 AM »
A great, great man right there. Thanks for posting that one.

Offline SpaceCat

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #45 on: 03/11/2006 02:02 AM »
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Ben - 10/3/2006  9:50 PM

A great, great man right there. Thanks for posting that one.

Totally agree, Ben.  Sagan did for space what Cousteau did for the oceans- hard to believe they're both gone now.  Two very big sets of shoes that I fear will never be adequately filled.

Offline Rocket Guy

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #46 on: 03/11/2006 02:08 AM »
Sagan's legacy to me was bringing space to the general public, especially through Cosmos. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to be picking up anymore in younger audiences (I am the exception!). The public was captivated by Voyager, and I think he can be credited with part of that. Even I can remember Neptune from when I was a kid, getting 'World' magazine (that was big for kids in the US back in the 1980s). Keep in mine those were the days before the internet, too.

If he was alive today, I can also bet NH would have had a plaque on it.

Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #47 on: 03/11/2006 02:15 AM »
The Russians were way ahead of America during the 50s and early 60s, they had launched the first Soviet satellite, first man in Space, first woman, sent the 1st Lunar probes hitting the Moon, the Russians did the first spacewalk and had designs for the first space station.

But Kennedy was right to say American would get ahead, because by July 1969 the Russians had failed to beat the U.S. Apollo program to land a man on the moon.

Here is a pic of the rocket  that was to carry out the first manned Soviet mission to the Moon, the N1 was was Russia's Saturn-V. However it was too complex and had design problems. It was flight tested in 1968 but a safety system reacted to a small internal fire and all of the 30 engines shut-off prematurely, the giant N-1 then fell back down on to the Russian launch pad causing a catastrophic explosion.






Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #48 on: 03/11/2006 02:53 AM »
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Ben - 10/3/2006  9:08 PM

Sagan's legacy to me was bringing space to the general public, especially through Cosmos.

A great man and a wonderfulk scientist, he was among the first to say Saturn's moon Titan and Jupiter's moon Europa may conatin running water or oceans. His work lives on through groups like Planetary Society, SETI, and NASA's missions to Mars. He thought Mars exploration and alternative propulsion systems were v important, I hope we can finish his search for alien life beyond our Planet

Offline Launch Fan

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #49 on: 03/12/2006 12:59 AM »

Offline Jim

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #50 on: 03/12/2006 01:46 AM »
added more

Offline To The Stars

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #51 on: 03/12/2006 02:40 AM »
Launch fan, that's a great image. So rollout is ok in those conditions?

Offline Peter NASA

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #52 on: 03/12/2006 03:07 AM »
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JulesVerneATV - 10/3/2006  9:15 PM

The Russians were way ahead of America during the 50s and early 60s, they had launched the first Soviet satellite, first man in Space, first woman, sent the 1st Lunar probes hitting the Moon, the Russians did the first spacewalk and had designs for the first space station.

But Kennedy was right to say American would get ahead, because by July 1969 the Russians had failed to beat the U.S. Apollo program to land a man on the moon.

Here is a pic of the rocket  that was to carry out the first manned Soviet mission to the Moon, the N1 was was Russia's Saturn-V. However it was too complex and had design problems. It was flight tested in 1968 but a safety system reacted to a small internal fire and all of the 30 engines shut-off prematurely, the giant N-1 then fell back down on to the Russian launch pad causing a catastrophic explosion.



I believe they tried five times, each failing shortly after launch.

Offline Rocket Guy

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #53 on: 03/12/2006 04:23 AM »
There were four N1 launches (and total failures) before the program was terminated. Today you can see the dismantled parts strewn around Baikonur and even made into a childrens playground in one case.

Offline Jim

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #54 on: 03/12/2006 11:44 AM »
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To The Stars - 11/3/2006  9:40 PMLaunch fan, that's a great image. So rollout is ok in those conditions?

It was only fog.† The main constraints are rain and wind.

Offline psloss

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #55 on: 03/12/2006 05:05 PM »
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To The Stars - 11/3/2006  10:40 PM

Launch fan, that's a great image. So rollout is ok in those conditions?
Yeah, that's a beauty...more than likely, the STS-6 rollout.

Offline Jonesy STS

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #56 on: 03/12/2006 07:41 PM »
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To The Stars - 11/3/2006  9:40 PM

Launch fan, that's a great image. So rollout is ok in those conditions?

That's my favourite so far. What a great site.

Offline JulesVerneATV

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #57 on: 03/13/2006 12:49 AM »
Corot will start searching for alien exoplanets this year. Corot exoplanet mission will use its telescope to monitor closely the changes in a starís brightness that comes from a planet crossing in front of it. In each field of view there will be one main target star for the asteroseismology as well as up to nine other targets. Simultaneously, it will be recording the brightness of 12,000 stars brighter than apparent magnitude 15.5 for an extra solar planet study.  COROT researchers, could announce some of the first rocky extrasolar terrestrial planets in 2006. The COROT project will contribute to the search for habitable, Earth-like planets around other stars.The mission was first started by the French back in 1996, and later the European members of ESA joined the mission, the Russians will help launch it by Soyuz-Fregat at BaikonurCosmodrome.


Offline James Lowe1

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #58 on: 03/13/2006 01:28 AM »
Two images removed due to copyright. Please ensure they are free to post before you do so.

Offline Rocket Guy

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RE: Superb images
« Reply #59 on: 03/13/2006 03:51 AM »
And it was an honest mistake, no big deal. Just be careful. If you aren't too sure, try checking online, such as the Boeing gallery, to see if it's there.

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