Author Topic: Discoverer 1 fails to make orbit  (Read 1318 times)

Offline Blackstar

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Discoverer 1 fails to make orbit
« on: 04/13/2009 05:25 PM »
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1347/1

Lost over the horizon: Discoverer 1 explores Antarctica
by Dwayne A. Day
Monday, April 13, 2009

A little over a week ago, North Korea launched a rocket that they claimed successfully placed a satellite into orbit. This was the second time they have claimed such a feat, and the second time that nobody has observed any such satellite orbiting overhead. The North Korean regime is lying and not interested in the truth. But if they were, they could have taken a lesson from the United States and its early experience with launching spacecraft over five decades ago.

On February 28, 1959, five weeks after a Discoverer spacecraft had nearly blown up on its pad at what is now known as Vandenberg Air Force Base (see “Battle’s Laws”, The Space Review, March 23, 2009), the US Air Force was ready to try again.

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: Discoverer 1 fails to make orbit
« Reply #1 on: 04/13/2009 09:52 PM »
I was wondering if the telemetry loss had anything to do with the Agena going over the horizon or was it just bad reception/transmission? We outsiders all thought in those days that an orbit had been achieved after what  looked like a perfect launch on that Saturday afternoon. Armed Forces Radio and Sky & Telescope were my sources of news and details in those days. Photos were very scarce.
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline Jim

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Re: Discoverer 1 fails to make orbit
« Reply #2 on: 04/13/2009 11:02 PM »
I was wondering if the telemetry loss had anything to do with the Agena going over the horizon or was it just bad reception/transmission? We outsiders all thought in those days that an orbit had been achieved after what  looked like a perfect launch on that Saturday afternoon. Armed Forces Radio and Sky & Telescope were my sources of news and details in those days. Photos were very scarce.

Over the horizon.  WTR/PMR lacked downrange sites like ETR.  Ships were needed back then.  Options for now are instrumented aircraft, portable ground stations on ocean going vessels or TDRSS

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