Author Topic: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected  (Read 11379 times)

Offline Jim

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RE: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected
« Reply #20 on: 03/07/2006 11:34 PM »
yes

Offline vt_hokie

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RE: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected
« Reply #21 on: 03/08/2006 02:36 AM »
I stand corrected then!   :)

Offline Avron

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RE: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected
« Reply #22 on: 03/08/2006 04:13 AM »
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Jim - 7/3/2006  6:17 AM

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Avron - 6/3/2006  10:49 PM
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vt_hokie - 6/3/2006  12:01 PM
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Jim - 6/3/2006  11:12 AMAll FAA licensed launched must have a disposal plan and for GEO sats, that includes fuel saved to boost them into a disposal orbit, which is super synchronous.
Yes, I realize this.  However, I think the disposal orbit is generally about 300 km beyond geostationary altitude, and there's a lot of crap accumulating out there!  Also, when geostationary satellites experience sudden failures, they never get a chance to make it into that disposal orbit.  
Would it not decay from super synchronous orbit, and take out a good bird?

Why would it decay.  GEO sats don't decay.  only LEO sats because they are "low earth orbit", close to the atmosphere.

Thanks Jim...

Offline vt_hokie

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RE: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected
« Reply #23 on: 03/08/2006 07:05 PM »
Here's something sort of close to what I was looking for that came up in a search:

Geostationary orbit decay and geostationary orbit crowding

The problem of a possible satellite collision due to the geostationary orbit decay is examined in view of the increasing number of geostationary satellites and the hazard of in-orbit exhaustion of fuel. A number of orbital decay mechanisms are outlined, among them electromagnetic drag on a charged satellite, meteorite and micrometeorite collisions, and solar radiation pressure. It is suggested that a geostationary satellite be boosted up to an altitude of 100-150 km prior to the expected exhaustion of fuel, which will delay the problem by about 500 years.

Offline Avron

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RE: $28 billion of GEO Sat launches projected
« Reply #24 on: 03/09/2006 03:47 AM »
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vt_hokie - 8/3/2006  3:05 PM

Here's something sort of close to what I was looking for that came up in a search:

Geostationary orbit decay and geostationary orbit crowding

The problem of a possible satellite collision due to the geostationary orbit decay is examined in view of the increasing number of geostationary satellites and the hazard of in-orbit exhaustion of fuel. A number of orbital decay mechanisms are outlined, among them electromagnetic drag on a charged satellite, meteorite and micrometeorite collisions, and solar radiation pressure. It is suggested that a geostationary satellite be boosted up to an altitude of 100-150 km prior to the expected exhaustion of fuel, which will delay the problem by about 500 years.

500 years... [Hard hat on]... STS-121 should be launching around then..:(

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