Author Topic: Spaceflight Magazine  (Read 120781 times)

Online Phillip Clark

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #200 on: 07/03/2018 06:24 AM »
Thank you for highlighting this.   Once Cosmos 2519 ends its current manoeuvres I will finalise the second article looking at the mission in 2018.

You can see my updates to the mission in the Kosmos 2519/2521/2523 thread in the "Russian Launches" section on here.
« Last Edit: 07/03/2018 07:41 AM by Phillip Clark »
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #201 on: 07/04/2018 06:27 PM »
Unidentified flying object
Analyst and specialist in Russian and Chinese space programmes, Phillip S. Clark examines the objectives behind the flight of Cosmos 2519 and associated satellites.

Deserving of a highlight given the author.  Congrats, Phillip.

You did not highlight my name....🤔

Online deruch

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #202 on: 07/11/2018 04:26 PM »
Unidentified flying object
Analyst and specialist in Russian and Chinese space programmes, Phillip S. Clark examines the objectives behind the flight of Cosmos 2519 and associated satellites.

Deserving of a highlight given the author.  Congrats, Phillip.

You did not highlight my name....
Wow, 2 3 articles by NSF regulars in the same issue!  I totally missed that and it is of course equally deserving of highlight.  My lame excuse will have to be that I knew Phillip's article was going to be in an upcoming issue, so I was specifically watching for it but didn't know to expect yours as well (I haven't followed the OmegA threads closely, so if it was announced there I may have missed it).  And then I managed to read right past your name without recognition when skimming the contents list.  My apologies.  Such embarrassment.   :-[ :-[

Congrats Jacques!
Quote
And then there were four
Gerard van der Haar and Jacques van Oene describe the newly named launch vehicle from Orbital ATK, the fourth in a plethora of new rockets vying for customers.
EDIT: see subsequent posts
« Last Edit: 07/12/2018 10:14 AM by deruch »
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #203 on: 07/12/2018 01:18 AM »

Online deruch

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #204 on: 07/12/2018 10:12 AM »
The June issue will have an article by me on using a GAMBIT satellite to image Skylab.
Quote

Saving Skylab (the Top Secret way)
Dwayne A. Day looks into the recently declassified archives and finds a subtext to the remarkable rescue mission of the Skylab space station involving the GAMBIT spy satellite.

Gee, I'm really tripping all over myself. :'(  I wouldn't have recognized your name on my own, but you did conveniently post that you had an article in this issue only a few comments above.  Well, at least this way you each get personalized, if somewhat belated in a few cases, congratulations.  Congrats, Blackstar! 
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #205 on: 07/13/2018 06:02 PM »
No worries. You should buy the issue. In fact, you should buy five of them: one to read, one to store for posterity, one to display on your coffee table, and two to give away as gifts. It's a beautiful-looking issue. So you really want it in your library.

(No. I don't get any money from them.)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #206 on: 07/24/2018 02:12 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 60 No 07 – July 2018

https://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-3/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2018/spaceflight-vol-60-no-07-july-2018/

Along paths trod by Vikings
NASA’s InSIGHT Mars mission is off and running but how does it fit within the general pattern of Mars exploration and what can we expect of it, with its twin CubeSats designed to relay communications during the crucial descent?

Lost & Found
Dr Jim Clemmet explains how Beagle 2 came to be found residing apparently intact on the surface of Mars and how images from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have helped rewrite the final chapter of this so very nearly successful mission.

Prophet of the Space Age
Author of a seminal biography of the renowned space age publicist Willy Ley, Jared S Buss gets behind this sometimes enigmatic character and helps us understand how he planted the first seeds of expectation before Wernher von Braun picked up the baton.

Happy landings
Phillip S. Clark gives us another deeply insightful analysis of the Russian space programme and examines 135 Soyuz landing times and recovery conditions, providing data which can be useful in predicting future landings.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #207 on: 07/24/2018 02:13 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 60 No 08 – August 2018

https://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-3/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2018/spaceflight-vol-60-no-08-august-2018/

To Russia with Love
Philip Corneille describes how Russia fell in love with an iconic Omega timepiece first worn by NASA astronauts.

A glimpse of the Cosmos
Nicholas Da Costa shows us around the refurbished Cosmos Pavilion – the Moscow museum for Russian space achievements.

Deadly Dust
The Editor looks back at results from the Apollo Moon landings and asks whether we are turning a blind eye to perils on the lunar surface.

Mapping the outer limits
SpaceFlight examines the latest findings concerning Charon, Pluto’s major satellite, using data sent back by NASA's New Horizons.

Peake Viewing
Rick Mulheirn comes face to face with Tim Peake’s Soyuz spacecraft and explains where this travelling display can be seen.

38th BIS Russia-Sino forum
Brian Harvey and Ken MacTaggart sum up the latest Society meeting dedicated to Russian and Chinese space activities.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #208 on: 07/24/2018 02:26 PM »
 The perils of living in the boondocks? August is out and I just got July yesterday.

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #209 on: 07/24/2018 11:15 PM »
The perils of living in the boondocks? August is out and I just got July yesterday.

One of the things that Spaceflight has struggled with--and I don't know if they have succeeded yet--is offering material that is not dated. This is a problem for all print magazines. If you can read it on the internet in a day or two, then a magazine should not be writing about it a month or two later. That makes the magazine useless. Rather, the magazine should be offering articles that are not based upon new developments, but have a broader scope. History articles, policy articles, overall observational articles.

Offline LtCmdr

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #210 on: 08/03/2018 08:17 AM »
Well the August 2018 number has all of that... Looking forward to more of these Apollo anniversary issues !
 :D
.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #211 on: 08/17/2018 09:17 AM »
Spaceflight Vol 60 No 09 – September 2018

https://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-3/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2018/spaceflight-vol-60-no-09-september-2018/

NASA at 60: what does the future hold?
This month we devote 23 pages to the issues facing NASA as it celebrates 60 years in space.

Breaking up is hard to do
With the partners in the ISS about to celebrate 20 years of co-operation, we examine the options for NASA for managing its future use.

Supply v. Demand
There is a flaw in the assumptions made about privatised space stations: too much hardware, not enough users. The implications are sobering.

Staying around
Flight schedules for the Space Launch System have been revised, giving the Block 1 a much longer lease of life – and perhaps a permanent presence in the future launcher mix.

More than it seems
A look at how NASA is supporting a stimulating programme of near-Earth and deep-space missions to plug the gaps in our knowledge.

What's in a number?
How much does NASA cost the American taxpayer? Not a lot as it turns out…

Space meets STEM
ESERO-UK Space Ambassador Jo Richardson FRAS explains how a European-wide programme of information and stimulation is connecting young people with exciting careers in space

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