Author Topic: Optimization of structures  (Read 2195 times)

Offline anasri1987

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Optimization of structures
« on: 08/25/2008 06:09 pm »
Hi all,

Could anyone inform me of how the structure of ARES V is optimized to handle loads that it experiences? Please also inform me of what type of loads it is (Undergraduate BE(MECH) terms, please)

Thanks.

Offline Antares

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Re: Optimization of structures
« Reply #1 on: 08/25/2008 08:16 pm »
It doesn't matter.  Ares V is half a notch above vapor ware.  The design has not progressed to that level of maturity.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline jarmumd

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Re: Optimization of structures
« Reply #2 on: 09/02/2008 07:31 pm »
Hi all,

Could anyone inform me of how the structure of ARES V is optimized to handle loads that it experiences? Please also inform me of what type of loads it is (Undergraduate BE(MECH) terms, please)

Thanks.

It (assuming it were to be designed similarly to the ARES I) is designed through a series of design cycles.  Initial designs of components (CAD drawings) become finite element models, which are given to loads analysis engineers.  These engineers run the FEM's through dynamic loads analysis software (some of which is programmed by hand).  The loads engineers give the modelers the loads to apply to their structures, and it is then that the design is changed.  Then the cycle starts again.  The kind of loads that the structure is designed to are your typical axial/shear/bending loads that come from analysis of flight events like liftoff or maximum aerodynamic pressure.

I doubt this answers your question, but you need to be a bit more specific.

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