Author Topic: Basic Rocket Science Q & A  (Read 383578 times)

Offline Wolfram66

Re: Basic Rocket Science Q & A
« Reply #1140 on: 04/03/2019 01:39 am »
This will give you an idea of the weirdness that goes on at triple point of CycloHexane



Offline IanO

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Re: Basic Rocket Science Q & A
« Reply #1141 on: 04/11/2019 03:38 pm »
Why is wind shear a problem for modern launches?  Were there historical launch failures due to wind shear?  Are there different rocket designs which allow launching through wind shear and what are the tradeoffs?
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Offline mme

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Re: Basic Rocket Science Q & A
« Reply #1142 on: 04/11/2019 05:58 pm »
Why is wind shear a problem for modern launches?  Were there historical launch failures due to wind shear?  Are there different rocket designs which allow launching through wind shear and what are the tradeoffs?
I don't have specific numbers but ... Wind shear causes a sudden sideways moment on the rocket, starting at the nose and then proceeding down the vehicle. Both payloads and the rocket itself are much stronger in the vertical axis than they are to lateral forces. Part of the agreement when launching is that both the lateral and axial g-loads will be constrained within known limits and exceeding those constraints could damage the payload itself and lead to mission failure.

And the F9 is really long and skinny which may make it more sensitive to flexing and developing harmonic oscillations. But now I'm mostly hand waving...
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Offline intelati

Re: Basic Rocket Science Q & A
« Reply #1143 on: 04/11/2019 08:38 pm »
Were there historical launch failures due to wind shear?

Not exactly sure how to ascribe the failure of Challenger between the booster O-Rings, Joint design, and the wind shear, but Challenger hit unprecedented wind shear before the break up of the vehicle

e:Columbia Challenger
« Last Edit: 04/12/2019 08:05 pm by intelati »
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Offline sunworshipper

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Re: Basic Rocket Science Q & A
« Reply #1144 on: 04/11/2019 08:48 pm »
Were there historical launch failures due to wind shear?

Not exactly sure how to ascribe the failure of Columbia between the booster O-Rings, Joint design, and the wind shear, but Columbia hit unprecedented wind shear before the break up of the vehicle
Do you mean Challenger?