Author Topic: If at first you don't succeed  (Read 1723 times)

Offline ambrous

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If at first you don't succeed
« on: 05/28/2008 12:07 AM »
I am reading Rocket Man about Pete Conrad.  It mentioned that Richard Gordon had applied for NASA Astronaut group 2 and did not make it.  That got me thinking about other astronauts that had failed to qualify in one group only to be chosen later on.  I know that Pete Conrad and Jim Lovell applied for Group 1.

Offline Proponent

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Re: If at first you don't succeed
« Reply #1 on: 05/28/2008 09:08 AM »
In his book "Carrying the Fire," Michael Collins mentions that he applied for Group 2.

Offline Ben E

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Re: If at first you don't succeed
« Reply #2 on: 06/01/2008 08:27 AM »
Turning it around slightly, with the obvious exception of the Mercury Seven, which astronauts were selected on their very first attempts?

I think Brent Jett was one, but I'm not sure.

Offline kimmern123

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Re: If at first you don't succeed
« Reply #3 on: 06/01/2008 08:48 AM »
Rick Husband applied several times before being accepted. At one of the interviews, he wore contact lenses at the eye exam and lied about it, but wasn't selected. The next time, he promised himself not to lie and see how things turn out. At that eye exam, he performed much better than needed for 20/20 vision.

That was the interview for the 1994-class, which he eventually was a part of.

Offline BigRIJoe

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Re: If at first you don't succeed
« Reply #4 on: 06/04/2008 09:21 AM »
Rick Husband applied several times before being accepted. At one of the interviews, he wore contact lenses at the eye exam and lied about it, but wasn't selected. The next time, he promised himself not to lie and see how things turn out. At that eye exam, he performed much better than needed for 20/20 vision.

That was the interview for the 1994-class, which he eventually was a part of.

I guess telling telling the truth earned him a ticket to his death.  He would have been better off repeating the lie, n'est ce-pas ?
« Last Edit: 06/04/2008 09:21 AM by BigRIJoe »

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