Author Topic: Sunglasses on the moon  (Read 5859 times)

Offline Hoonte

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Sunglasses on the moon
« on: 05/23/2008 01:57 PM »
True or False?? I have serious doubts

http://www.opticsplanet.net/ao-original-pilot-57mm-silver.html

Qoute
'In fact, American Optical Original Pilot Sunglass was honored to be the first ever sunglass to be brought up to the moon with the crew of the "Eagle" lunar landing in 1969. It was subsequently featured in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.'

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RE: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #1 on: 05/23/2008 02:47 PM »
According to Smithsonian's website, these are the glassed worn by Michael Collins on Apollo 11.

A full listing of the Apollo 11 artifacts in the SI is here:

http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/ATTM/artifacts.html
















Offline DMeader

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #2 on: 05/23/2008 02:58 PM »
I can't lay hands on them at the moment, but I seem to remember seeing photos of crewmembers in the spacecraft with sunglasses.

If the ad is implying that they wore them inside the EMU during EVA on the lunar surface, that they did not do to the best of my knowledge.



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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #3 on: 05/23/2008 03:58 PM »
Quote
DMeader - 23/5/2008  9:58 AM

I can't lay hands on them at the moment, but I seem to remember seeing photos of crewmembers in the spacecraft with sunglasses.

If the ad is implying that they wore them inside the EMU during EVA on the lunar surface, that they did not do to the best of my knowledge.



I think wearing glasses in low gravity in a spacesuit would be incredibly awkward.

Offline rsp1202

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Offline SpaceCat

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #5 on: 05/23/2008 05:34 PM »
Sad thing- try to find American Op or Bausch & Lomb frames today.... all been replaced by Chinese imports. :(

Offline brihath

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RE: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #6 on: 05/23/2008 05:54 PM »
Quote
Hoonte - 23/5/2008  9:57 AM

True or False?? I have serious doubts

http://www.opticsplanet.net/ao-original-pilot-57mm-silver.html

Qoute
'In fact, American Optical Original Pilot Sunglass was honored to be the first ever sunglass to be brought up to the moon with the crew of the "Eagle" lunar landing in 1969. It was subsequently featured in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.'

I would not be surprised.  Almost all military pilots wore these sunglasses, they were a standard USAF issue item.  They weren't necessary in the EMU's, but they definately could have been worn in the CM or LM when the suits were not worn.  I always had a pair back in my AFROTC and USAF days.

Offline dwmzmm

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #7 on: 05/24/2008 12:16 AM »
I remember watching live the coverage of the Apollo - 11 crew (mainly Buzz Aldrin) during the checkout of the LM on the coast toward
the moon; Buzz was wearing sunglasses during this live telecast.
Dave, NAR # 21853 SR.

Offline toddbronco2

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #8 on: 05/24/2008 01:20 AM »
Yeah, that would be silly for the astronauts to wear sunglasses during the EVA since they would have a hard time adjusting them if they can't touch their face with their hands (which brings up the question I always wondered about: what if the astronaut really had to sneeze?  Did he just paint the inside of his visor, or was there anything else he could do?)

The glasses for Collins seems like a good idea.  He spent  alot of time making observations out the window of the CM, didn't he?  That moon must have been bright!

Offline Kaputnik

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #9 on: 05/24/2008 10:23 AM »
The moon would appear much less bright than, say, the clouds on Earth do from LEO. IIRC the albedo of the lunar surface is only something like 7% but clouds can be more like 70%.
Waiting for joy and raptor

Offline toddbronco2

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Re: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #10 on: 05/24/2008 02:15 PM »
Yeah, I know that the moon only has a 0.07 albedo, but high contrast environments are hard on the human eye.  Expecting an astronauts eyes to adjust to the total blackness of space and the bright grey of the moon is kinda like walking from a dark room outside into sunlight.  The moon can be dazzling on a clear night on Earth, so don't pretend that in orbit around the moon that the moon will look faint just because it has a lower albedo than snow.

Offline Podkayne

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RE: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #11 on: 05/24/2008 02:38 PM »

Here's a discussion of lighting constraints on lunar surface operations .  The focus of the report is on operations during the lunar night, but there is discussion and comparison of lunar noon and other lighted conditions.

"Experience during the Apollo Program suggests that EVA activities during the period around the lunar noon may be difficult due to lack of surface definition caused by elimination of shadows. "


Offline edkyle99

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RE: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #12 on: 05/24/2008 03:08 PM »
Quote
Podkayne - 24/5/2008  9:38 AM

Here's a discussion of lighting constraints on lunar surface operations .  The focus of the report is on operations during the lunar night, but there is discussion and comparison of lunar noon and other lighted conditions.

"Experience during the Apollo Program suggests that EVA activities during the period around the lunar noon may be difficult due to lack of surface definition caused by elimination of shadows. "


I seem to recall that the Soviets had the same problem with their Lunokhod rovers.  They drove one of them right into a sizable crater that could not be seen during lunar noon even though it was right in front of the vehicle.  It took quite some time to drive the rover out of the crater.  

Someone will need to make "rover glasses" too!

 - Ed Kyle

Offline heng44

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RE: Sunglasses on the moon
« Reply #13 on: 05/25/2008 08:55 AM »

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