Author Topic: The suborbital thread!  (Read 781322 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1780 on: 09/05/2018 07:09 AM »
Photos from above link.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1781 on: 09/05/2018 09:03 AM »
The Hyperbola-1Z differs at least by having grid fin stabilizers instead of fins as on the first Hyperbola-1S.

As a side remark: these are not the first suborbital Cubesats - NASA has flown some years ago CP1U and AdamaSat suborbital on a Terrier Mk.70 Improved Malemute sounding rocket.

Offline SciNews

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1782 on: 09/05/2018 01:25 PM »
« Last Edit: 09/06/2018 03:40 AM by SciNews »

Offline Lar

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1783 on: 09/06/2018 01:13 PM »
A perhaps silly question.... payloads designed to do astronomical observations (or solar)... how useful are these, really? I am assuming their observation time is measured in minutes if not seconds. Can you get a lot of science done in that period? Or is it the case that these are testbeds for payload development that might eventually fly on something that achieves, and stays, in orbit? If some of each, what are typical fractions?
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
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Offline QuantumG

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1784 on: 09/06/2018 10:23 PM »
Test flights.
I hear those things are awfully loud. It glides as softly as a cloud. What's it called? Monowhale!

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1785 on: 09/07/2018 03:13 AM »
A reminder that in China today, in addition to a satellite launch from Taiyuan, the company OneSpace is also flying a sub-orbital flight today from Jiuquan, just 2 days after some other company flew theirs first:

https://twitter.com/AJ_FI/status/1035420528494956544
Quote
Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) in September, this time from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in the Gobi Desert.

IIRC they are going for max. velocity of Mach 4.5 this time. According to reports the flight will be on September 7.

OneSpace. Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) 5 September. Tianfu Junrong No.1 - SQX-1Z.

This is not a OneSpace flight, but is from another competitor who (at least by name - more on that in another post elsewhere  ::)) is trying to beat them to the punch!
« Last Edit: 09/07/2018 03:13 AM by Galactic Penguin SST »
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1786 on: 09/07/2018 04:21 AM »
A reminder that in China today, in addition to a satellite launch from Taiyuan, the company OneSpace is also flying a sub-orbital flight today from Jiuquan, just 2 days after some other company flew theirs first:

https://twitter.com/AJ_FI/status/1035420528494956544
Quote
Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) in September, this time from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in the Gobi Desert.

IIRC they are going for max. velocity of Mach 4.5 this time. According to reports the flight will be on September 7.

OneSpace. Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) 5 September. Tianfu Junrong No.1 - SQX-1Z.

This is not a OneSpace flight, but is from another competitor who (at least by name - more on that in another post elsewhere  ::)) is trying to beat them to the punch!

Update: launched successfully at 04:10 UTC.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1787 on: 09/07/2018 06:21 AM »
A reminder that in China today, in addition to a satellite launch from Taiyuan, the company OneSpace is also flying a sub-orbital flight today from Jiuquan, just 2 days after some other company flew theirs first:

https://twitter.com/AJ_FI/status/1035420528494956544
Quote
Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) in September, this time from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in the Gobi Desert.

IIRC they are going for max. velocity of Mach 4.5 this time. According to reports the flight will be on September 7.

OneSpace. Private Chinese launch company OneSpace will launch its second OS-X  suborbital rocket (aka Chongqing Liangjiang Star) 5 September. Tianfu Junrong No.1 - SQX-1Z.

This is not a OneSpace flight, but is from another competitor who (at least by name - more on that in another post elsewhere  ::)) is trying to beat them to the punch!

Update: launched successfully at 04:10 UTC.

Due to customer requirements the flight stayed fully within the upper atmosphere, with apogee at 35 km, downrange distance of 169 km and flight time of 200 seconds.

http://tech.qq.com/a/20180907/069476.htm

Notice the spear tip on this flight's rocket.....  8)
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline SciNews

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1788 on: 09/07/2018 11:03 AM »
A perhaps silly question.... payloads designed to do astronomical observations (or solar)... how useful are these, really?
These were just a "technological demonstration". ADA-Space is working on a "Star Age" AI constellation, "each satellite is equipped with self-memory, self-identification, self-processing, self-adapted to the function"
Is someone knows Chinese, maybe provide a better translation http://www.edu-gov.cn/news/98157.html

Offline Lewis007

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1789 on: 09/08/2018 06:00 AM »
Space.com has an article about the OneSpace launch, which includes two videos, one of which being the launch as seen by the Jilin-1 sat (attached below).

Offline Lewis007

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1790 on: 09/08/2018 06:48 AM »
A Black Brant 9 sounding rocket was launched from White Sands on September 7 at 11:21 MDT local time (17:21 UT) carrying the FOXSI payload (36.325 US).

More info: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/nasa-funded-rocket-to-view-sun-with-x-ray-vision

Offline Lewis007

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1791 on: 09/13/2018 06:32 AM »

Offline Lewis007

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1792 on: 09/13/2018 06:34 AM »
Another launch from Spaceport America, NM, on Aug 25: this one of EXOS Aerospace's SARGE rocket. It reached an altitude of 28 km.
More info: http://www.parabolicarc.com/2018/09/12/results-exos-aerospace-sarge-launch-spaceport-america/
« Last Edit: 09/13/2018 06:39 AM by Lewis007 »

Offline SciNews

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1793 on: 09/14/2018 07:38 PM »
Black Brant IX onboard camera on NASA’s FOXSI mission

A Black Brant IX suborbital sounding rocket launched NASA’s Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, on 7 September 2018, at 17:21 UTC (13:21 EDT). FOXSI reached an altitude of about 189 miles to search for nanoflares on the Sun using its X-ray vision. The video was filmed by a camera at the bottom of the payload.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1794 on: 09/21/2018 05:14 PM »
Andoya Space Center Warning
I think this is for the Nammo Nucleus Sounding rocket.
Launch between 17 September and 3 October (but Not Between 21 - 23 September) each day the launch window is from 10:00-18:00 local time.  (CEST | UTC+2)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1795 on: 09/24/2018 09:23 PM »
Andoya shares renders of the Nucleus rocket on their twitter page.
And a NRK article with foto's and renderings

Foto from NRK.
« Last Edit: 09/24/2018 09:34 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1796 on: 09/25/2018 04:30 PM »
And here is a ASC article. And:

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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« Last Edit: 10/08/2018 09:08 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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« Last Edit: 10/08/2018 09:12 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Olaf

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Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1799 on: 10/12/2018 06:33 AM »
http://russianforces.org/blog/2018/10/annual_exercise_of_the_strateg.shtml
Quote
On October 11, 2018 the Russian strategic forces conducted an annual exercise that involved launches of SLBMs and launches of weapons carried by long-range bombers.

The SLBM launches were conducted from one of the Project 667BDRM submarines of the Northern Fleet from the Barents Sea to the Kura test range and one of the submarines of the Pacific Fleet, probably Project 667BDR class Ryazan, from the Sea of Okhotsk to the Chizha test range. It appears that in both cases it was a salvo launch, but there is no official information about the number of missiles that were involved.

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