Author Topic: Griffin encourages UK to participate in manned moon missions  (Read 6147 times)

Offline cabbage

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Mike Griffin is keen on UK "Moonlite" probe - and encourages UK to be partner in human moon exploration:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7143197.stm

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Dr Griffin added that he also wanted the UK to have its own astronauts in future.

"I think enormous benefit would accrue to the UK in joining what I often refer to as the world's human space flight programme," he suggested.

"The space station programme is approaching a point where it will behind us; it will be deployed, it will be operational. The UK chose not to join that programme."

But, Dr Griffin added: "The time is now to decide if the UK wants to join the next phase of human space flight, which will involve a return to the Moon sometime in the next decade.

"I would very much like to bring our oldest and closet ally into that partnership."

Offline simonbp

Personally, I'd prefer MoonRaker of the two, as penetrators tend to have bad luck (DS2, anyone?). Still it could make Britain the third nation to land on the moon, assuming the Chinese or Japanese don't first...

Simon ;)

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encouraging news, it can only add weight to the "agency" call.

Offline Chris Bergin

We've heard it all before, but I really like this approach of aligning with NASA.

The UK needs its own agency, with its own goals, and then align with the likes of NASA.

Offline Captain Scarlet

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What's Griffin's motive here. NASA after a customer...someone to spread the costs? Regardless, let's do it. We're wasting over $400m a year on ESA and who's heard of ESA here in the general public?

Offline sfjcody

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How is this different from what Luna Glob will do earlier? (Luna Glob will launch in 2009)

Online docmordrid

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Not bloody likely as the UK is pulling out of all manner of advanced science projects from physics to telescopes.  Shortsighted, but since when is that a surprise with government finances?

List of cuts;

the 8 meter Gemini telescopes in Chile and Hawaii

the Isaac Newton telescopes in the Canary Islands (extrasolar planet search)

the International Linear Collider (ILC), the successor to the LHC (large hadron collider) opening next year

gamma-ray astronomy & ground-based studies of the Sun's effect on the Earth
DM

Offline David BAE

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docmordrid - 15/12/2007  6:04 AM

Not bloody likely as the UK is pulling out of all manner of advanced science projects from physics to telescopes.  Shortsighted, but since when is that a surprise with government finances?

List of cuts;

the 8 meter Gemini telescopes in Chile and Hawaii

the Isaac Newton telescopes in the Canary Islands (extrasolar planet search)

the International Linear Collider (ILC), the successor to the LHC (large hadron collider) opening next year

gamma-ray astronomy & ground-based studies of the Sun's effect on the Earth

Good. It's the vast swarths of cash being thrown into these projects that needs to be redirected into something that will interest the taxpayers.

Most of the above are astronomy.

Offline Blackstar

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sfjcody - 15/12/2007  4:41 AM

How is this different from what Luna Glob will do earlier? (Luna Glob will launch in 2009)

Is Luna-Glob even going to happen?

Lotsa Russian vaporware out there, little indication that any of it is funded.

Offline Analyst

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Captain Scarlet - 15/12/2007  11:22 AM

We're wasting over $400m a year on ESA and who's heard of ESA here in the general public?

And this your measure of success and impact? Sad. :(

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David BAE - 15/12/2007  1:15 PM

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docmordrid - 15/12/2007  6:04 AM

Not bloody likely as the UK is pulling out of all manner of advanced science projects from physics to telescopes.  Shortsighted, but since when is that a surprise with government finances?

List of cuts;

the 8 meter Gemini telescopes in Chile and Hawaii

the Isaac Newton telescopes in the Canary Islands (extrasolar planet search)

the International Linear Collider (ILC), the successor to the LHC (large hadron collider) opening next year

gamma-ray astronomy & ground-based studies of the Sun's effect on the Earth

(1) Good. It's the vast swarths of cash being thrown into these projects that needs to be redirected into something that will interest the taxpayers.

(2) Most of the above are astronomy.

(1) Vast swarths? Huh, $400 million per year. The interest of the taxpayer is your measure of success and impact? Sad. :(
(2) And manned spaceflight to the moon is more important exactly why?

Analyst

Offline EE Scott

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Blackstar - 15/12/2007  11:38 AM

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sfjcody - 15/12/2007  4:41 AM

How is this different from what Luna Glob will do earlier? (Luna Glob will launch in 2009)

Is Luna-Glob even going to happen?

Lotsa Russian vaporware out there, little indication that any of it is funded.

Let's hope some of those billions of petrodollars pouring into Russia will be earmarked for Luna-Glob and other Russian space-science projects.  It is time for Russian space-science to re-awaken itself.

As far as the UK goes, it does seem like funding is drying up a bit - at least relative to expectations/forecasts of a few years ago.

And of course the UK should have its own space agency.  It has the expertise as well as a long tradition of being on the forefront of science, why shouldn't or couldn't the UK divert a few hundred million pounds from ESA to its own agency?  A lean and focused UK space agency that partnered with NASA and ESA, as appropriate, could do very significant things on a consistent basis.  That is a very exciting prospect to me.
Scott


Offline sfjcody

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Blackstar - 15/12/2007  4:38 PM

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sfjcody - 15/12/2007  4:41 AM

How is this different from what Luna Glob will do earlier? (Luna Glob will launch in 2009)

Is Luna-Glob even going to happen?

Lotsa Russian vaporware out there, little indication that any of it is funded.


http://www.russianspaceweb.com/spacecraft_planetary_lunar.html

Quote from the above website:

"...another lunar exploration project -- Luna-Glob -- made it into the Russian space program at the beginning of the 21st century. Speaking at the 5th International Aerospace Congress in Moscow, on August 29, 2006, Deputy Chief of the Federal Space Agency, Vitaly Davydov, listed Luna-Glob among high-priority exploration projects funded by the Russian government. In December of the same year, Roskosmos announced that the launch of the Luna-Glob spacecraft was scheduled for 2012. However in November 2007, Russian officials quoted launch date for Luna-Glob as 2010 and at the beginning of December 2007, during President Putin's visit to NPO Lavochkin, its head Georgy Polishuyk announced that the first new-generation spacecraft would be launched toward the Moon in 2009, or "three years earlier than planned.""

Offline Chris Bergin

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Gary - 15/12/2007  8:03 PM

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Chris Bergin - 15/12/2007  10:09 AM

We've heard it all before, but I really like this approach of aligning with NASA.

The UK needs its own agency, with its own goals, and then align with the likes of NASA.

I agree - Where do I apply?!  :laugh:

You can apply to the Yorkshire branch at:

www.eh-up-lad-does-thou-fancy-trip-t'-ISS?.com ;)

(The Americans won't get that, especially those that think we all speak like Hugh Grant).

Offline Jonesy STS

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Good to see Griffin has worked out the value of the UK. Now will the UK government with a boring fart in power now Blair's gone do anything? Seen as the Conservatives will have a landslide win next year, will David Cameron look at this again?


Offline William Barton

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Chris Bergin - 15/12/2007  3:18 PM

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Gary - 15/12/2007  8:03 PM

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Chris Bergin - 15/12/2007  10:09 AM

We've heard it all before, but I really like this approach of aligning with NASA.

The UK needs its own agency, with its own goals, and then align with the likes of NASA.

I agree - Where do I apply?!  :laugh:

You can apply to the Yorkshire branch at:

www.eh-up-lad-does-thou-fancy-trip-t'-ISS?.com ;)

(The Americans won't get that, especially those that think we all speak like Hugh Grant).

Some of us do watch all those PBS imports, Farnans and all.

Offline Justin Space

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Would setting up a drive of our own nessassarly mean we would have to depart from ESA?

I assume ESA has nothing to do with the EU treaty that was signed last week, much to everyone's anoyance in the UK.

Offline cabbage

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I think it very unlikely that the UK would leave ESA on account of developing closer human spaceflight links with the US (especially as the ESA activities we currently support don't include human spaceflight anyway). Membership of ESA gives us the opportunity to set priorities for the work we fund (such as the various space science programmes), which is not quite the same as putting instruments onto other spacecraft.

(Apparently, Mike Griffin was in the UK at the end of last week - he gave a talk on lunar exploration to the Royal Astronomical Society which covers some of the same ground.  Looking at his speeches on the NASA website it's clear that there is an "international participation" theme in quite a few.

I wonder what level of financial commitment he's looking for from the UK?

Offline Jorge

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Justin Space - 17/12/2007  7:35 AM

Would setting up a drive of our own nessassarly mean we would have to depart from ESA?

Why would it? Italy has bilateral agreements with the US on space that are separate from ESA; it doesn't affect Italy's status within ESA.
JRF

Offline meiza

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I think that many of you UK guys should study a little before posting about ESA and all that space agency stuff. The opinions are very firm, but the facts are not there.

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