Author Topic: Exploration technology tests in the RATS program  (Read 763 times)

Offline eeergo

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Exploration technology tests in the RATS program
« on: 12/11/2007 12:19 PM »

Some very interesting developments in the Desert RATS program, involving technologies that may be applied for the future lunar missions:

- A lunar dust-repelling system for use in transparent surfaces, and with foreseen applications in surface suits.

- Sealed quick-disconnects to avoid dust contamination and erosion. In relation to this, they are talking about the possibility of scavenging the leftovers in the descent module's propellant tanks, for life support needs (or even some others) Nice picture illustrating this:

- Communication and habitat developments.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/exploration/mmb/ksc_drats.html

-DaviD-

Offline hyper_snyper

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Re: Exploration technology tests in the RATS program
« Reply #1 on: 12/11/2007 01:19 PM »
Wrong link.  That one points to a story about MER.

Offline eeergo

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Re: Exploration technology tests in the RATS program
« Reply #2 on: 12/11/2007 02:25 PM »

Quote
hyper_snyper - 11/12/2007 3:19 PM Wrong link. That one points to a story about MER.

Sorted. Tabbed browsing isn't always good :)

-DaviD-

Offline simonbp

Re: Exploration technology tests in the RATS program
« Reply #3 on: 12/11/2007 03:03 PM »
Just to note, they're NOT in the desert, but rather cinder lake in the San Francisco volcanic field next to Flagstaff. This is where they explosively recreated the cratered surface at the original prime Apollo site (in Mare Tranquilis, but not where 11 landed). Most of the cratering has been eroded by ATV drivers over the years, but in the top photo, you can still see some of the hummocky terrain...

http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/About/AstroHistory/astronauts.html

Simon ;)

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