Author Topic: Surveyor Program  (Read 3994 times)

Offline Andy_Small

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Surveyor Program
« on: 10/04/2007 05:37 PM »
I have a couple questions about the Surveyor Program.

Was there a curise stage attached to the spacecraft?  I've read where there were 3 rocket engines that fired at about 3.5m above the lunar surface.  I would thing there there would have to be a burn to get them onto the moon from a cruise stage.  There doesent look to be enough fuel onboard to do all the things that would have to be done to get to the surface.

I've looked around and can't find anything.

Thanks

Offline Rusty_Barton

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RE: Surveyor Program
« Reply #1 on: 10/04/2007 06:33 PM »
These NASA reports have the info you are looking for.

Surveyor Lander Mission and Capabilities
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19640019055_1964019055.pdf

Surveyor Automated Landing Missions
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19690075314_1969075314.pdf


Surveyor 1 Mission Report
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19660026658_1966026658.pdf



The Surveyor separated from the Centaur after being placed on a trans-lunar trajectory.
Surveyor had three main, liquid fueled, vernier engines that were also used for course corrections and the final landing maneuver. In addition it had a large, spherical, solid fuel rocket motor, nestled within its frame, that slowed the Surveyor for the landing maneuver. It fired at 60 miles altitude when the Surveyor was going 6,100 mph. It burned out before landing, at 25,000 ft, after it had slowed the Surveyor to 240 mph. At that point, the burnt out solid motor was ejected and the verniers took the Surveyor the rest of the way to the lunar surface.

Offline Andy_Small

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #2 on: 10/04/2007 06:50 PM »
were the main engines hypergol?

Offline Rusty_Barton

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #3 on: 10/04/2007 06:56 PM »
Quote
Andy_Small - 4/10/2007  11:50 AM

were the main engines hypergol?

Yes.

Offline meiza

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #4 on: 10/05/2007 09:49 AM »
The Surveyor program is interesting from the Lunar X-Prize competition point of view.

Offline Andy_Small

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #5 on: 10/05/2007 02:36 PM »
That's a good point.  It would be a good baseline for a team to use as a design.  Since the requirements are alot like what Surveyor did.  The diffrence would be the rover aspect.

Offline rsp1202

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RE: Surveyor Program
« Reply #6 on: 10/05/2007 03:36 PM »
Check me; this is from memory: Once landed, Surveyor's verniers were able to provide enough thrust to lift and hop the craft X number of feet away from its original landing site. It performed this maneuver during at least one mission.

Offline wingod

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RE: Surveyor Program
« Reply #7 on: 10/05/2007 03:45 PM »
Quote
rsp1202 - 5/10/2007  10:36 AM

Check me; this is from memory: Once landed, Surveyor's verniers were able to provide enough thrust to lift and hop the craft X number of feet away from its original landing site. It performed this maneuver during at least one mission.

Yep


Offline Rusty_Barton

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #8 on: 10/05/2007 03:48 PM »
During the Surveyor 3 landing, the verniers did not turn off just above the surface as intended. They cutoff after landing, causing the Surveyor 3 to hop several times before finally coming to rest. The Surveyor 6 fired its vernier engines, after being on the surface for some time and intentionally took off and flew across the surface several feet before coming to rest again.

Offline Jim

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #9 on: 10/05/2007 03:54 PM »
Quote
Andy_Small - 5/10/2007  10:36 AM

That's a good point.  It would be a good baseline for a team to use as a design.  Since the requirements are alot like what Surveyor did.  The diffrence would be the rover aspect.


Not really, there were versions of the surveyor with tracks instead of pads

Offline Andy_Small

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #10 on: 10/05/2007 04:01 PM »
wow I didn't know that.  The only ones I've seen where with the pads.

Offline Rusty_Barton

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #11 on: 10/05/2007 04:05 PM »
All of the seven flight model Surveyors had landing pads. There were designs for versions with tracks, but they never flew.

Offline Raoul

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #12 on: 10/19/2007 07:20 PM »
Here are panoramics from the Surveyors:

http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00000856

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Offline rsp1202

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Re: Surveyor Program
« Reply #13 on: 10/19/2007 08:07 PM »
As a follow-on to your post (thanks, by the way), see:
http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521819305
Looks to be very interesting.

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