Author Topic: ESA - XMM-Newton updates  (Read 22399 times)

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #40 on: 06/24/2018 07:44 pm »
XMM-NEWTON FINDS MISSING INTERGALACTIC MATERIAL

20 June 2018

After a nearly twenty-year long game of cosmic hide-and-seek, astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory have finally found evidence of hot, diffuse gas permeating the cosmos, closing a puzzling gap in the overall budget of 'normal' matter in the Universe.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/60427-xmm-newton-finds-missing-intergalactic-material/

Image credit: ESA

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #41 on: 08/13/2018 07:28 pm »
FLARING SOURCE IN NGC 6540

A peculiar X-ray source spotted in the globular cluster NGC 6540 as part of a collaboration between scientists at the National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) in Milan, Italy, and a group of students from a local high school.

In 2005, ESA's XMM-Newton saw this source undergo a flare that boosted the luminosity of the source by up to 50 times its normal level for about five minutes.

Too short to be an ordinary stellar flare, but too faint to be linked to a compact object, this event is challenging our understanding of X-ray outbursts.

- Related article: Students digging into data archive spot mysterious X-ray source

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/60535-flaring-source-in-ngc-6540/

Image credit: ESA/XMM-Newton; A. De Carlo (INAF)
« Last Edit: 08/13/2018 08:54 pm by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #42 on: 10/05/2018 11:18 am »
TRACING THE UNIVERSE: X-RAY SURVEY SUPPORTS STANDARD COSMOLOGICAL MODEL

04 October 2018

Scanning the sky for X-ray sources, ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has been busy with the XXL Survey, its largest observational programme to date. The second batch of data from the survey has just been released, including information on 365 galaxy clusters, which trace the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution through time, and on 26 000 active galactic nuclei (AGN).

By examining two large regions of the sky at great sensitivity, this is the first X-ray survey to detect enough galaxy clusters and AGN in contiguous volumes of space to make it possible for scientists to map the distribution of these objects out to the distant Universe in unprecedented detail. The results are compatible with expectations from the currently-accepted cosmological model.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/60686-tracing-the-universe-x-ray-survey-supports-standard-cosmological-model/

Credits: ESA/XMM-Newton/XXL Survey and CFHT Legacy Survey/CTIO/XXL Survey

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #43 on: 11/24/2018 09:11 am »
FROM GAMMA RAYS TO X-RAYS: NEW METHOD PINPOINTS PREVIOUSLY UNNOTICED PULSAR EMISSION

21 November 2018

Based on a new theoretical model, a team of scientists explored the rich data archive of ESA's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra space observatories to find pulsating X-ray emission from three sources. The discovery, relying on previous gamma-ray observations of the pulsars, provides a novel tool to investigate the mysterious mechanisms of pulsar emission, which will be important to understand these fascinating objects and use them for space navigation in the future.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/60950-from-gamma-rays-to-x-rays-new-method-pinpoints-previously-unnoticed-pulsar-emission/

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #44 on: 02/03/2019 07:42 pm »
ACTIVE GALAXIES POINT TO NEW PHYSICS OF COSMIC EXPANSION

28 January 2019

Investigating the history of our cosmos with a large sample of distant 'active' galaxies observed by ESA's XMM-Newton, a team of astronomers found there might be more to the early expansion of the Universe than predicted by the standard model of cosmology.

According to the leading scenario, our Universe contains only a few percent of ordinary matter. One quarter of the cosmos is made of the elusive dark matter, which we can feel gravitationally but not observe, and the rest consists of the even more mysterious dark energy that is driving the current acceleration of the Universe's expansion.

This model is based on a multitude of data collected over the last couple of decades, from the cosmic microwave background, or CMB – the first light in the history of the cosmos, released only 380 000 years after the big bang and observed in unprecedented detail by ESA's Planck mission – to more 'local' observations. The latter include supernova explosions, galaxy clusters and the gravitational distortion imprinted by dark matter on distant galaxies, and can be used to trace cosmic expansion in recent epochs of cosmic history – across the past nine billion years.

A new study, led by Guido Risaliti of Universitŕ di Firenze, Italy, and Elisabeta Lusso of Durham University, UK, points to another type of cosmic tracer – quasars – that would fill part of the gap between these observations, measuring the expansion of the Universe up to 12 billion years ago.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/61068-active-galaxies-point-to-new-physics-of-cosmic-expansion/

Image credit: Elisabeta Lusso & Guido Risaliti
« Last Edit: 02/03/2019 07:44 pm by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #45 on: 03/22/2019 11:21 am »
XMM-Newton discovers galactic ‘chimneys’ – annotated

Artist’s impression of two ‘chimneys’ funneling hot, X-ray emitting material from the centre of our Galaxy into two huge cosmic bubbles.

The two galactic chimneys were revealed using data collected between 2016 and 2018 by ESA’s XMM-Newton space observatory, which completed the most extensive X-ray map ever made of the Milky Way’s core.

The giant, gamma-ray emitting bubbles had been discovered by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. They form a shape akin to a colossal hourglass, spanning about 50 000 light years from end to end – comparable to the size of the Milky Way’s stellar disc, and to around half the diameter of the entire Galaxy.

The two hot channels found by XMM-Newton stream outwards from Sagittarius A*, our Galaxy’s central supermassive black hole, and extend each for hundreds of light years, finally linking the immediate surroundings of the black hole and the bubbles together. Scientists think that these ‘chimneys’ act as a set of exhaust pipes through which energy and mass are transported from our Galaxy’s heart out to the base of the bubbles, replenishing them with new material.

More information: Giant ‘chimneys’ vent X-rays from Milky Way’s core

https://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2019/03/XMM-Newton_discovers_galactic_chimneys_annotated

Image credit: ESA/XMM-Newton/G. Ponti et al. 2019; ESA/Gaia/DPAC (Milky Way map)

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