Author Topic: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)  (Read 4429 times)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Quote
On the president’s schedule today: He “participates in the signing of a space policy directive to streamline regulations on commercial use of space” at 11 am EDT.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/999615506029170688
« Last Edit: 05/24/2018 10:40 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive on Commercial Use of Space
« Reply #1 on: 05/24/2018 02:14 pm »
Quote
At 11:00 am EDT today President Trump will sign Space Policy Directive 2. It will include 4 space policy directives based on recommendations made at the National Space Council meeting at KSC in Feb and is based on SPD 1.

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999649212844380160

Quote
Space Policy Directive 2 directs Dept of Transportation to revise regulatory process for transportation to space and the Dept of Commerce for remote sensing

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999649241093083138

Quote
Space Policy Directive 2 will also create a "one stop shop" for commercial space at Dept of Commerce

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999649266015571968

Quote
Space Policy Directive 2 will ask Dept of Commerce and OSTP to work with FCC report to the President global competitiveness on radio frequency policy at ITU and other fora

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999649288526450689

Quote
Space Policy Directive 2 requires a report on export licensing of space technology

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999649350086258688

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive on Commercial Use of Space
« Reply #2 on: 05/24/2018 04:31 pm »
Quote
REFORMING SPACE POLICY: President Trump’s Space Policy Directive – 2 reforms America’s commercial space regulatory framework, ensuring our place as a leader in space commerce.

Space Policy Directive – 2 (Directive) sets executive branch policy to ensure that government regulations adopted and enforced promote economic growth; minimize uncertainty for taxpayers, investors, and private industry; protect national security, public-safety, and foreign policy interests; and encourage American leadership in space commerce.
   
Under the Directive, the Secretary of Transportation is to release a new regulatory system for managing launch and re-entry activity, targeting an industry that is undergoing incredible transformation with regulations that have failed to keep up.
       
+ In writing the new rules, the Secretary will consider requiring a single license for all types of commercial space flight launch and re-entry operations and replacing prescriptive requirements in the process with performance-based criteria.
+  The President is committed to ensuring that the Federal government gets out of the way and unleashes private enterprise to support the economic success of the United States.

The commercial remote sensing industry is a critical national asset. As such, the Directive requires the Commerce Secretary to review commercial remote sensing regulations for consistency with the Directive’s policy and address regulations that do not conform.

+ The current regulatory system is woefully out of date and needs significant reform to ensure the United States remains the chosen jurisdiction for these high tech companies.
+  President Donald J. Trump is committed to reform these systems in order to ensure American companies have every advantage in the international marketplace.

Within 30 days, the Commerce Secretary is directed to transmit a plan to create a “one-stop shop” within the Department of Commerce for administering and regulating commercial space flight activities.

Agencies are directed to present to the President a report on improving global competitiveness of United States space radio frequency spectrum policies, regulation, and activities at the International Telecommunication Union and other multilateral forums.

The Directive requires the National Space Council to review export licensing regulations affecting commercial space flight activity and deliver recommendations to the President within 180 days.

UPDATING AND REFOCUSING: President Trump is committed to reforming our out-of-date space policies and has already taken significant steps to refocus United States space strategy.

On March 23, 2018, President Trump unveiled a National Space Strategy that prioritizes American interests, ensuring a strategy that will make America strong, competitive, and great.

On June 30 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order reconvening the National Space council for the first time in 24 years.

+ On December 11, 2017, the President signed Space Policy Directive – 1, instructing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to return American astronauts to the Moon, followed by human missions to Mars.
 + Space Policy Directive – 2 is the second batch of recommendations made to the President by the National Space Council.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-reforming-modernizing-american-commercial-space-policy/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive on Commercial Use of Space
« Reply #3 on: 05/24/2018 10:34 pm »
Quote
Space Policy Directive- 2  (SPD-2) signing in the Oval Office today instagram.com/p/BjLOFayAtcW/

https://twitter.com/nasawatch/status/999771039625302016

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Quote
Space Policy Directive-2 (Full Text)

Status Report From: White House
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2018

May 24, 2018
 
Space Policy Directive-2
 
MEMORANDUM FOR THE VICE PRESIDENT
THE SECRETARY OF STATE
THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE
THE SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION
THE SECRETARY OF HOMELAND SECURITY
THE SECRETARY OF LABOR
THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE
THE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET
THE ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS
THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
THE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY
THE ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR HOMELAND SECURITY AND COUNTERTERRORISM
THE CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF
 
SUBJECT: Streamlining Regulations on Commercial Use  of Space

Section 1.  Policy.  It is the policy of the executive branch to be prudent and responsible when spending taxpayer funds, and to recognize how government actions, including Federal regulations, affect private resources.  It is therefore important that regulations adopted and enforced by the executive branch promote economic growth; minimize uncertainty for taxpayers, investors, and private industry; protect national security, public-safety, and foreign policy interests; and encourage American leadership in space commerce.

Sec. 2.  Launch and Re-entry Licensing.  (a)  No later than February 1, 2019, the Secretary of Transportation shall review regulations adopted by the Department of Transportation that provide for and govern licensing of commercial space flight launch and re-entry for consistency with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum and shall rescind or revise those regulations, or publish for notice and comment proposed rules rescinding or revising those regulations, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

(b)  Consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum, the Secretary of Transportation shall consider the following:

(i)   requiring a single license for all types of commercial space flight launch and re-entry operations; and (ii)  replacing prescriptive requirements in the commercial space flight launch and re-entry licensing process with performance-based criteria.

(c)  In carrying out the review required by subsection (a) of this section, the Secretary of Transportation shall coordinate with the members of the National Space Council.

(d)  The Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Transportation, and the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall coordinate to examine all existing U.S. Government requirements, standards, and policies associated with commercial space flight launch and re‑entry operations from Federal launch ranges and, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, to minimize those requirements, except those necessary to protect public safety and national security, that would conflict with the efforts of the Secretary of Transportation in implementing the Secretary's responsibilities under this section.

Sec. 3.  Commercial Remote Sensing.  (a)  Within 90 days of the date of this memorandum, the Secretary of Commerce shall review the regulations adopted by the Department of Commerce under Title II of the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992 (51 U.S.C. 60101 et seq.) for consistency with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum and shall rescind or revise those regulations, or publish for notice and comment proposed rules rescinding or revising those regulations, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

(b)  In carrying out the review required by subsection (a) of this section, the Secretary of Commerce shall coordinate with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense, the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and, as appropriate, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

(c)  Within 120 days of the date of the completion of the review required by subsection (a) of this section, the Secretary of Commerce, in coordination with the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense, shall transmit to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget a legislative proposal to encourage expansion of the licensing of commercial remote sensing activities.  That proposal shall be consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum.

Sec. 4.  Reorganization of the Department of Commerce.  (a)  To the extent permitted by law, the Secretary of Commerce shall consolidate in the Office of the Secretary of Commerce the responsibilities of the Department of Commerce with respect to the Department's regulation of commercial space flight activities.

(b)  Within 30 days of the date of this memorandum, the Secretary of Commerce shall transmit to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget a legislative proposal to create within the Department of Commerce an entity with primary responsibility for administering the Department's regulation of commercial space flight activities.

Sec. 5.  Radio Frequency Spectrum.  (a)  The Secretary of Commerce, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, shall work with the Federal Communications Commission to ensure that Federal Government activities related to radio frequency spectrum are, to the extent permitted by law, consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum.

(b)  Within 120 days of the date of this memorandum, the Secretary of Commerce and the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, in consultation with the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and in coordination with the members of the National Space Council, shall provide to the President, through the Executive Secretary of the National Space Council, a report on improving the global competitiveness of the United States space sector through radio frequency spectrum policies, regulation, and United States activities at the International Telecommunication Union and other multilateral forums.

Sec. 6.  Review of Export Licensing Regulations.  The Executive Secretary of the National Space Council, in coordination with the members of the National Space Council, shall:

(a)  initiate a review of export licensing regulations affecting commercial space flight activity;

(b)  develop recommendations to revise such regulations consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this memorandum and with applicable law; and

(c)  submit such recommendations to the President, through the Vice President, no later than 180 days from the date of this memorandum.

Sec. 7.  General Provisions.  (a)  Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii)  the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b)  This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c)  This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

(d)  The Secretary of Transportation is authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
 

DONALD J. TRUMP
 

// end //

http://spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=51471
« Last Edit: 05/24/2018 10:41 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline TomH

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2278
  • Vancouver, WA
  • Liked: 992
  • Likes Given: 367
Short WaPo article re. Trump administration's support for commercial space. Kind've a fluff piece, but relevant to what general public sees.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2018/05/24/why-the-trump-administration-wants-to-make-it-easier-for-elon-musks-spacex-and-others-to-get-to-space/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.97ab736622e3

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Short WaPo article re. Trump administration's support for commercial space. Kind've a fluff piece, but relevant to what general public sees.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2018/05/24/why-the-trump-administration-wants-to-make-it-easier-for-elon-musks-spacex-and-others-to-get-to-space/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.97ab736622e3

Not really a fluff piece. WaPo is trying to spin a positive thing in as negative a light as possible, without making any actual non-factual statements, as usual (because it's related to Trump).
« Last Edit: 05/25/2018 08:29 pm by mlindner »
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline Coastal Ron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4653
  • I live... along the coast
  • Liked: 3343
  • Likes Given: 4573
Not really a fluff piece. WaPo is trying to spin a positive thing in as negative a light as possible, without making any actual non-factual statements, as usual (because it's related to Trump).

I'll quote from the article where they are quoting an actual Trump spokesperson:

Quote
In a call with reporters, a senior White House official said: “We realized that budgets are limited, and this is not going to be a Cold War space race where we drop almost unlimited amounts of money on a problem. So, if we’re really going to do our space exploration activities, we need to grow the economy. And one of the best ways we can think of to grow the economy, in fact, is to deregulate it, streamline it, provide new enabling regulations that provide a foundation for all of our space activities.”

I'm sorry, but I just don't see anything specific in that statement about how (A) regulations for space industries are keeping us from doing more in space, and (B) as a result of removing regulations it will "grow the economy" and result in more funding for NASA.

Congress does fund NASA as a percentage of the U.S. GDP, and it makes no sense to lock in a spending plan for NASA that ignores the need for NASA to do more or less in space. NASA is not an entitlement program, though Congress does like to treat it as a way to distribute money around to states.

So while MAYBE these changes to regulations are good for the space industry and to the people of the U.S., the administration has failed to show how they result in any changes for NASA.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Brovane

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1141
  • United States
  • Liked: 631
  • Likes Given: 1201
Not really a fluff piece. WaPo is trying to spin a positive thing in as negative a light as possible, without making any actual non-factual statements, as usual (because it's related to Trump).

I'll quote from the article where they are quoting an actual Trump spokesperson:

Quote
In a call with reporters, a senior White House official said: “We realized that budgets are limited, and this is not going to be a Cold War space race where we drop almost unlimited amounts of money on a problem. So, if we’re really going to do our space exploration activities, we need to grow the economy. And one of the best ways we can think of to grow the economy, in fact, is to deregulate it, streamline it, provide new enabling regulations that provide a foundation for all of our space activities.”

I'm sorry, but I just don't see anything specific in that statement about how (A) regulations for space industries are keeping us from doing more in space, and (B) as a result of removing regulations it will "grow the economy" and result in more funding for NASA.

Congress does fund NASA as a percentage of the U.S. GDP, and it makes no sense to lock in a spending plan for NASA that ignores the need for NASA to do more or less in space. NASA is not an entitlement program, though Congress does like to treat it as a way to distribute money around to states.

So while MAYBE these changes to regulations are good for the space industry and to the people of the U.S., the administration has failed to show how they result in any changes for NASA.

Shotwell has talked previously about how regulations impact SpaceX activities. 

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/05/spacex-president-gwynne-shotwell-slams-space-regulations.html

"You have to basically apply for a new license" if an operator makes a change like switching launch pads at a spaceport, Shotwell said.

But Shotwell criticized the amount of time it takes to apply, saying the process takes six months "and then you re-apply at 90 days, 30 days, and then 15 days to file a flight plan."
"Look at that! If anybody ever said, "you'll be sitting in a spacecraft naked with a 134-pound backpack on your knees charging it", I'd have said "Aw, get serious". - John Young - Apollo-16

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #10 on: 05/26/2018 08:37 am »
I'm sorry, but I just don't see anything specific in that statement about how (A) regulations for space industries are keeping us from doing more in space, and (B) as a result of removing regulations it will "grow the economy" and result in more funding for NASA.

Numerous companies in the National Space Council, SpaceX included, mentioned problems with current regulation. I've personally dealt with these regulations myself. When my university flew a tiny cell phone camera (with a wide lens) with a less than 640x480 resolution on a 1U cubesat (10x10x10 cm), we had to get licenses from NOAA to prove that we weren't a spy satellite... These are the kind of absurdities that are dated back to the cold war and before miniaturization of electronics took place. These regulations are long overdue for updating. This is just one example. Please read the other articles, notably the spacenews article and the whitehouse press release in order to get a full understanding of the situation. This is the problem with using WaPo as a source for information.

Quote
Congress does fund NASA as a percentage of the U.S. GDP, and it makes no sense to lock in a spending plan for NASA that ignores the need for NASA to do more or less in space. NASA is not an entitlement program, though Congress does like to treat it as a way to distribute money around to states.

So while MAYBE these changes to regulations are good for the space industry and to the people of the U.S., the administration has failed to show how they result in any changes for NASA.

This has NOTHING to do with NASA.

Edit: Edited myself some to make the post a bit more civil. I find it personally frustrating that there are people that are on the other side of this issue.
« Last Edit: 05/26/2018 08:42 am by mlindner »
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline butters

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1803
  • Liked: 429
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #11 on: 05/26/2018 09:42 am »
This seems fine. I'm a little confused as to why the Secretary of Transportation is in charge of implementing regulatory changes which seem like they'll be enforced by the Department of Commerce. Hopefully this doesn't devolve into a turf war between the two. But otherwise the intentions seem good.

The more general anti-regulatory rhetoric is obviously partisan politics and isn't going to change the various ways that regulatory power is used to control the flow of money and licenses. For example, the strings attached to licensing for LEO constellations (e.g. dictating deployment timelines) have little to do with promoting economic growth and seems like a trap set to ensnare the most ambitious applicant. And let's not even talk about HSF in this context.

But the NOAA remote sensing fiasco was absurd, and it's heartening that the administration is moving to fix this kind of nonsense.

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #12 on: 05/27/2018 01:57 am »
This seems fine. I'm a little confused as to why the Secretary of Transportation is in charge of implementing regulatory changes which seem like they'll be enforced by the Department of Commerce. Hopefully this doesn't devolve into a turf war between the two. But otherwise the intentions seem good.

The more general anti-regulatory rhetoric is obviously partisan politics and isn't going to change the various ways that regulatory power is used to control the flow of money and licenses. For example, the strings attached to licensing for LEO constellations (e.g. dictating deployment timelines) have little to do with promoting economic growth and seems like a trap set to ensnare the most ambitious applicant. And let's not even talk about HSF in this context.

But the NOAA remote sensing fiasco was absurd, and it's heartening that the administration is moving to fix this kind of nonsense.

I'm not seeing whats partisan here and I don't think anything partisan is going on. Opposing it would be an item of partisanship, but that's not occurring. As mentioned in the space news article, this is almost directly taking requests for deregulation that were requested by companies that attended the national space council meeting.
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline Coastal Ron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4653
  • I live... along the coast
  • Liked: 3343
  • Likes Given: 4573
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #13 on: 05/27/2018 02:17 am »
Numerous companies in the National Space Council, SpaceX included, mentioned problems with current regulation

Companies always want less regulation, so that is nothing new.

Quote
I've personally dealt with these regulations myself. When my university flew a tiny cell phone camera (with a wide lens) with a less than 640x480 resolution on a 1U cubesat (10x10x10 cm), we had to get licenses from NOAA to prove that we weren't a spy satellite... These are the kind of absurdities that are dated back to the cold war and before miniaturization of electronics took place.

As SpaceX made very clear when they launched out of VAFB and announced that they had to cut off the video feed due to NOAA. This is nothing new or unique in modern times. Remember the U.S. Government just recently decided to REGULATE drones, which previously hadn't been. So things are always in flux.

Quote
These regulations are long overdue for updating.

And they should be. However my original questions stand:
...how (A) regulations for space industries are keeping us from doing more in space, and (B) as a result of removing regulations it will "grow the economy" and result in more funding for NASA.

This is the problem with using WaPo as a source for information.

PLEASE go back and REREAD what I posted, since I anticipated how partisan this topic could be and ONLY used direct quotes from a senior White House official. So your issue is with the Trump Administration, NOT WaPo.

Quote
This has NOTHING to do with NASA.

Again, the reason why I used a direct quote from "a senior White House official" is to try and avoid the need to interpret. I'll post the quote again, and feel free to explain why they are not talking about NASA:

Quote
In a call with reporters, a senior White House official said: “We realized that budgets are limited, and this is not going to be a Cold War space race where we drop almost unlimited amounts of money on a problem. So, if we’re really going to do our space exploration activities, we need to grow the economy. And one of the best ways we can think of to grow the economy, in fact, is to deregulate it, streamline it, provide new enabling regulations that provide a foundation for all of our space activities.”
« Last Edit: 05/28/2018 01:47 am by Coastal Ron »
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline docmordrid

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5456
  • Michigan
  • Liked: 2844
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #14 on: 05/28/2018 07:07 am »
Here comes the Depertment of Commerce one-stop-shop

http://spacenews.com/commerce-department-to-create-space-administration/

Quote
Commerce Department to create SPACE Administration

LOS ANGELES  With the signing of a new presidential directive calling for commercial space regulatory reform, the Commerce Department has released new details about its plans to create a "one-stop shop" for such issues.
>
The SPACE Administration, the department said, will incorporate the Commercial Remote Sensing Regulatory Affairs office and the Office of Space Commerce, currently part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The department was already planning such a consolidation of the offices, which would be moved out of NOAA and directly under Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.
>
In an op-ed published on the White House website May 25, and which first appeared in the New York Times, Ross said the SPACE Administration will improve regulation of the space industry by combining functions spread across several agencies.
>
« Last Edit: 05/28/2018 07:11 am by docmordrid »
DM

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2208
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 952
  • Likes Given: 369
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #16 on: 05/28/2018 09:14 pm »
Again, the reason why I used a direct quote from "a senior White House official" is to try and avoid the need to interpret. I'll post the quote again, and feel free to explain why they are not talking about NASA:

Quote
In a call with reporters, a senior White House official said: “We realized that budgets are limited, and this is not going to be a Cold War space race where we drop almost unlimited amounts of money on a problem. So, if we’re really going to do our space exploration activities, we need to grow the economy. And one of the best ways we can think of to grow the economy, in fact, is to deregulate it, streamline it, provide new enabling regulations that provide a foundation for all of our space activities.”

If we're only talking about this quote and nothing else then I would say its fine to ignore that quote. It's a secondary source and that wording isn't any of the official releases. WaPo likely (just guessing) dug for that information in the interview so they could have some "bad" information to put in the article so they could prove to their readers what they wanted to show. You shouldn't take that as gospel truth.

Anyway this entire conversation is besides the point. I do happen to agree that deregulating/updating regulation of the industry will smooth the friction that space companies have in getting started and allow for more companies to get venture capital. This point is related to NASA because the long term goal here is to have NASA actually flying science missions and get them out of building launch vehicles (SLS) among other things.
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7820
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 9177
  • Likes Given: 3136
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #17 on: 05/29/2018 06:36 pm »
Quote
[email protected] signed the Space Policy Directive 2, which acts on the Feb. 2018, recommendations made by the #NationalSpaceCouncil.

https://twitter.com/faanews/status/1001511618839277570

Quote
By Feb. 2019, @USDOT Secretary Elaine Chao will release a new system for managing #space launch and re-entry activities.

https://twitter.com/faanews/status/1001512577397153792

Quote
In writing the new #space launch rules, @USDOT, Secretary Chao will consider requiring a single license for all types of commercial space flight launch and re-entry operations.

https://twitter.com/faanews/status/1001513192022069248

Quote
[email protected], Secretary Chao will consider a performance-based criterion for commercial space flight launch and re-entry licensing.

https://twitter.com/faanews/status/1001513620533075968

Offline Coastal Ron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4653
  • I live... along the coast
  • Liked: 3343
  • Likes Given: 4573
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #18 on: 05/29/2018 08:14 pm »
Again, the reason why I used a direct quote from "a senior White House official" is to try and avoid the need to interpret. I'll post the quote again, and feel free to explain why they are not talking about NASA:

Quote
In a call with reporters, a senior White House official said: “We realized that budgets are limited, and this is not going to be a Cold War space race where we drop almost unlimited amounts of money on a problem. So, if we’re really going to do our space exploration activities, we need to grow the economy. And one of the best ways we can think of to grow the economy, in fact, is to deregulate it, streamline it, provide new enabling regulations that provide a foundation for all of our space activities.”

If we're only talking about this quote and nothing else then I would say its fine to ignore that quote. It's a secondary source and that wording isn't any of the official releases.

A direct, on-the-record quote from a White House official is not "a secondary source". Not unless you're saying that only things that Trump tweets are known to be official statements...  ;)

Quote
WaPo likely (just guessing) dug for that information in the interview so they could have some "bad" information to put in the article so they could prove to their readers what they wanted to show. You shouldn't take that as gospel truth.

Your rationalization is a form of the "scapegoat" defense mechanism. Such as "You made me do it!", or, "See what you made me do!".

In this case you are blaming the person asking the question for what the person said, instead of assuming the person speaking was in total control of their actions.

Please don't do that, especially since it makes the person being quoted look like a fool. And I'm sure you're not implying only fools work for Trump...  :o

Quote
I do happen to agree that deregulating/updating regulation of the industry will smooth the friction that space companies have in getting started and allow for more companies to get venture capital.

Do you have any proof that "regulation" is what has been holding back venture capital investment in space-oriented startups? I've seen none, and I do follow the space startup sector. VC's are more concerned with the potential size of a market and not with the near-term barriers. In fact SpaceX is a good example of where they were getting investment before this deregulation push was known about.

Quote
This point is related to NASA because the long term goal here is to have NASA actually flying science missions and get them out of building launch vehicles (SLS) among other things.

I agree with you on the goal, but deregulation is not a factor in whether that happens or not. The SLS was not created because there was too much regulation in the commercial transportation sector.

And what the senior White House official said does comport with things being proposed by the administration, in that they don't see the U.S. Government paying the full price for human space exploration, and they want the private sector to pick up part of the cost - and "growing the economy" is part of how they assume that will happen. Which means NASA won't be going anywhere under a Trump administration unless the economy increases substantially.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline yg1968

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9820
  • Liked: 1500
  • Likes Given: 897
Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 2 (on Commercial Use of Space)
« Reply #19 on: 05/29/2018 08:57 pm »
Can we please discuss the Space Policy Directive 2 itself instead of some secondary (WaPo) source material (which isn't very good anyways).
« Last Edit: 05/29/2018 09:00 pm by yg1968 »

Tags: