Author Topic: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B  (Read 28243 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7


                                                   July 26, 2006 (JST)
                             Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
that we have reported the launch schedule of the 22nd scientific
mission satellite "SOLAR-B" by the M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 to the
Space Activities Commission (SAC) as follows.

(Dates and time are Japan Standard Time.)

Scheduled date of launch : September 23 (Sat), 2006
Launch windows           : September 24 (Sun) thru 30 (Sat), 2006
Launch time              : 6:00 thru 7:00 a.m.
Launch Site              : Uchinoura Space Center


Publisher : Public Affairs Department
            Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
            Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
            1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
            Japan
            TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

Offline isana

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #1 on: 07/27/2006 08:09 am »
According to the article in Japanese site, it will be the last launch of M-V.
They will start research of the next solid fuel rocket smaller and cheaper than M-V.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/07/20060726_sac_m-v_j.html

Some newspaper said that new launch vehicle will use SRB-A(H2A's SRB) for 1st stage and M-V's second stage.
It will launch 500kg into LEO, and cost 2.5 billion yen par launch.
http://373news.com/2000picup/2006/07/picup_20060721_1.htm

(These pages are in Japanese. You should use translation services.)
--


Offline Maverick

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #2 on: 07/28/2006 02:46 pm »
Great! I love JAXA's webcasts!

Offline isana

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #3 on: 08/11/2006 02:15 am »
Launch sequence and flight path
original: http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/j/snews/2006/0713_mv7_data.shtml
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Offline jacqmans

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #4 on: 09/04/2006 10:12 am »
About SOLAR-B

SOLAR-B is the third solar physics satellite of ISAS which was approved as a successor of the highly successful Japan/US/UK YOHKOH (SOLAR-A) collaboration. It employs SOT,a large optical telescope with 50-cm aperture,and two X-ray / extreme ultraviolet imagers,XRT and EIS. By observing simultaneously visible surface of the Sun (photosphere) and the solar corona,SOLAR-B aims to understand the origin and consequences of various active phenomena which take place in the corona.
In order to suppress as much as possible variation of heat input to the spacecraft, which is indispensable for achieving ultra-high spatial resolution of SOT (0.2 seconds of arc), and to realize long-term uninterrupted observation of the Sun, SOLAR-B is so designed as to take the sun-synchronous polar orbit. From this orbit on the day-night boundary of the earth, SOLAR-B will be able to observe the Sun continuously for 8 months in a year.

Specification
=  Total Weight : 900 kg
=  Size : 1.6 x 1.6 x 4.0 m
=  Total length of Solar Paddles : 10 m
=  Orbit : 600 km circular orbit (sun-synchronous)
 

Offline jacqmans

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #5 on: 09/18/2006 06:13 pm »
LOCKHEED MARTIN INSTRUMENT SUITE TO STUDY DYNAMIC SOLAR ACTIVITY ON NEW INTERNATIONAL SUN MISSION

PALO ALTO, CALIF.,September 18, 2006

A suite of instruments called the Focal Plane Package (FPP) - designed and built at the Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory of the Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto - is scheduled for launch on the Solar-B satellite from the Uchinoura Space Center, Kagoshima, Japan on Sept. 23, 2006.

The primary scientific goal of the Solar-B mission is to observe how changes in the magnetic field at the Sun's surface propagate through the different higher layers of the solar atmosphere.

Solar-B is an international cooperative mission between NASA, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council of the United Kingdom, and the European Space Agency. It is the second mission in the Solar Terrestrial Probes Program within the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and follow-on to the successful Solar-A (or Yohkoh) mission, for which Lockheed Martin provided the Soft X-ray Telescope.

"The FPP suite will provide high-resolution optical measurements that will show us the connections between changes in the Sun's magnetic field and features of the solar atmosphere, both steady state ?- like coronal heating - or transient -- like flares and coronal mass ejections," said Dr. Ted Tarbell, Lockheed Martin FPP principal investigator. "The solar group at the ATC has been working towards flying an instrument like this in space for more than 25 years, and having it on this international collaborative investigation is enormously satisfying."

The FPP comprises four distinct sub-systems - a broadband filter imager (BFI), a narrowband filter imager, a spectra-polarimeter and a correlation tracker to stabilize the images - and resides on the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) whose mirror and structure were designed and developed by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Mitsubishi Electronics Company. The SOT is the largest solar optical telescope ever to be flown in space and will be able to resolve features on the surface of the Sun just 90 mi. (150 km) across.

Solar-B will perform coordinated measurements of the different layers of the solar atmosphere from a Sun-synchronous orbit around the Earth. Three instruments will perform these measurements, the previously mentioned SOT, an Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer and an X-Ray Telescope.

These instruments will measure the Sun's magnetic field in the photosphere and the ultraviolet and X-ray radiation, emitted by the transition region/low corona, and the upper corona. Scientists will use the data obtained to gain a more precise understanding of the sources and mechanisms of the Sun's variability.

JAXA is the overall lead for the Solar-B mission, the spacecraft, the launch vehicle and management of space operations. NASA provided the Focal Plane Package for the SOT, and components for the X-ray Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, as well as engineering support for integration of the three instruments. The Lockheed Martin ATC designed and built the FPP.

The Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory at the ATC has a long heritage of spaceborne solar instruments including the Soft X-ray Telescope on the Japanese Yohkoh satellite, the Michelson Doppler Imager on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, the solar telescope on NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Solar X-ray Imager on the GOES-N environmental satellite. The laboratory also conducts basic research into understanding and predicting space weather and the behavior of our Sun including its impacts on Earth and climate.

The ATC is the research and development organization of Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). LMSSC, a major operating unit of Lockheed Martin Corporation, designs, develops, tests, manufactures and operates a variety of advanced technology systems for military, civil and commercial customers. Chief products include a full-range of space launch systems, including heavy-lift capability, ground systems, remote sensing and communications satellites for commercial and government customers, advanced space observatories and interplanetary spacecraft, fleet ballistic missiles and missile defense systems.
 
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Pager: 1-888-916-1797

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #6 on: 09/18/2006 09:42 pm »
Besides the Solar-B payload, two small payloads will share the launch:

HITSAT - a cubesat
SSSat - another solar sail experiment (probably similar to the one on the previous M-V launch


Offline anik

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #7 on: 09/19/2006 08:30 pm »
M-V-7 appears from the Launch Assembly Tower
September 19, 2006

http://www.jaxa.jp/news_topics/hot_topics/index_e.html

"After completing the operational test for the launcher angle setting on Sep. 16, the M-V Launch Vehicle No.7, scheduled to be launched on September 23, 2006, came out from the Launch Assembly Tower. Launch preparations are progressing smoothly. Local people made and presented a thousand origami paper cranes praying for the success of the launch."

SOLAR-B/M-V-7 Countdown Page
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/countdown/index.shtml

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #8 on: 09/20/2006 10:50 am »
A new Japanese-led solar mission with ESA participation is preparing for launch on 23 September 2006. Solar-B will study the mechanisms which power the solar atmosphere and look for the causes of violent solar eruptions.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM9ZE8LURE_index_0.html
 

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #9 on: 09/21/2006 02:36 pm »
Does anyone understand the M-V flight control systems?  Each stage appears to use at least two different control methods during their flight phases!

The first stage uses "MNTVC" and "SMRC".

The second stage uses "LITVC", "SMRC" and "SMSJ"

Stage three uses "MNTVC" and "SJ"

I'm guessing that "TVC" is thrust vector control and that "RC" is reaction control, but the rest is a bit baffling.  

 - Ed Kyle

Offline anik

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #10 on: 09/21/2006 07:28 pm »
SOLAR-B/M-V-7 Launch Rehearsal Completed
September 21, 2006

http://www.jaxa.jp/news_topics/hot_topics/index_e.html

"During the night of Sep. 19, a launch rehearsal was carried out following the actual launch process in the same way as on the launch day to confirm the schedule and operation of all equipment. At the pitch dark launch site, the launch assembly tower, which stores the launch vehicle, and the antennas were lit up, and the rehearsal was completed after the rocket launcher angle was set. The launch is scheduled for Sep. 23 (Sat), and the live broadcast of the SOLAR-B/M-V-7 launch is scheduled to start at 5:30 a.m.(JST) on the launch day."

Offline jacqmans

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #11 on: 09/22/2006 09:22 am »
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                     ***  JAXA MAIL SERVICE  ***
                 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                     Launch Time of SOLAR-B/M-V-7

                                              September 22, 2006 (JST)
                             Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
that the launch time of the Solar Physics Satellite (SOLAR-B) aboard
the M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 (M-V-7) has been determined as follows
based on the collision avoidance analysis with the manned space
system(s)*. (The date and time are Japan Standard Time, JST.)


Scheduled Launch Day: September 23 (Sat), 2006
Launch Time: 6:36 a.m.**


* A collision avoidance analysis is an analysis carried out prior to a
rocket launch to avoid a collision with manned space systems, such as
the International Space Station, which are in orbit. In principal, a
launch vehicle and any of its separated objects should not collide
with manned space systems from the launch until its completion of the
first round around the earth.

** The launch time has been determined based on the best time to
inject the satellite into its orbit as the whole original launch time
range (6:00 to 7:00 a.m.) was found to be free from any possibility of
collision with manned space systems after the collision avoidance
analysis.

This information is also available on the following website:
SOLAR-B/M-V-7 Countdown
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/countdown/index.shtml


Mission website:
  Solar Physics Satellite "SOLAR-B"
  http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/enterp/missions/solar-b/index.shtml


---------------------------------------------------------------------
Publisher : Public Affairs Department
            Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
            Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
            1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
            Japan
            TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

Offline koroljow

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Re: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #12 on: 09/22/2006 10:33 am »
Quote
edkyle99 - 21/9/2006  4:19 PM

Does anyone understand the M-V flight control systems?  Each stage appears to use at least two different control methods during their flight phases!

The first stage uses "MNTVC" and "SMRC".

The second stage uses "LITVC", "SMRC" and "SMSJ"

Stage three uses "MNTVC" and "SJ"

I'm guessing that "TVC" is thrust vector control and that "RC" is reaction control, but the rest is a bit baffling.  

 - Ed Kyle

Hello Ed,

that's what I know:

MNTVC = Moveable Nozzle Thrust Vector Control
LITVC = Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control
SMRC = Solid Rocket Motors for Roll Control
SMSJ = Solid Motor Side Jet

Olaf Bieler
Geschichte und Geschichten aus sechs Jahrzehnten Raumfahrt:
http://www.raumfahrtkalender.de

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #13 on: 09/22/2006 01:08 pm »
Cool. We'll cover this with a preview and live updates, images etc.
Will bump to newsfeed nearer launch time.

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #14 on: 09/22/2006 01:47 pm »
Live update:



09/22 21:56: Launch operation is going well along the schedule.

We launch balloons for the measurement of wind effect ON the rocket trajectry.

---------------

09/22 20:45: Preparation is advanced favorably.
 

Launch operation is going well along the schedule.

---------------

09/22 20:32: About Uchinoura

I introduse about Uchinoura Space Center (USC).

Founded in February 1962, the USC is located in Uchinoura ON the east of Ohsumi Peninsula, Kagoshima Prefecture. The area of USC, 71 ha in total, is mostly hilly. Facilities for launching rockets, telemetry, tracking and command stations for rockets and satellites, and optical observation posts are ON site, all prepared by flattening the tops of several hills and connected to each other by road. Since 1962, more than 300 rockets have been launched and including satellite launch vehicles.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #15 on: 09/22/2006 02:14 pm »
09/22 22:45

Checkout operation of SOLAR-B has been started.

Offline edkyle99

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #16 on: 09/22/2006 02:58 pm »
This thing will blister its way to orbit.  It will reach orbital velocity in five and three-quarter minutes.

And that includes more than two minutes of coasting!

 - Ed Kyle

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #17 on: 09/22/2006 03:04 pm »
09/22 23:46

Checkout operation is going well....

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #18 on: 09/22/2006 03:06 pm »
Quote
edkyle99 - 22/9/2006  3:41 PM

This thing will blister its way to orbit.  It will reach orbital velocity in five and three-quarter minutes.

And that includes more than two minutes of coasting!

 - Ed Kyle

Damn that doesn't hang about.

Anyone know how M-V stacks up against Delta II?

Offline edkyle99

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RE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7
« Reply #19 on: 09/22/2006 03:15 pm »
Quote
Chris Bergin - 22/9/2006  9:49 AM

Quote
edkyle99 - 22/9/2006  3:41 PM

This thing will blister its way to orbit.  It will reach orbital velocity in five and three-quarter minutes.

And that includes more than two minutes of coasting!

 - Ed Kyle

Damn that doesn't hang about.

Anyone know how M-V stacks up against Delta II?

NASA's Calipso/Cloudsat mission used a 2.5-stage Delta 7920 to reach low earth orbit.  The first second stage burn ended about 11 minutes 15 seconds after liftoff (no coasting!), placing the stack into a 115 x 434 mile preliminary orbit.  A brief second stage apogee burn took place about an hour after liftoff to circularize the orbit.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline Jim

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #20 on: 09/22/2006 03:24 pm »
Of course.  It is all solids.   Look at Pegasus, Taurus, Minotaur and Scout times

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #21 on: 09/22/2006 03:51 pm »
09/23  00:08

The Control Center. After the liftoff, the operation authority will be transferred from the Launch Control Center to this Control Center.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #22 on: 09/22/2006 03:54 pm »
6 hours to launch now...

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #23 on: 09/22/2006 04:37 pm »
Moving to newsfeed for live coverage. Preview on site soon.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #24 on: 09/22/2006 04:38 pm »
09/23  01:19

Checkout operation has been finished. Further launch operation follows.


Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #25 on: 09/22/2006 06:01 pm »
09/23  02:33

Launch operation is going well along the schedule.

Offline edkyle99

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #26 on: 09/22/2006 06:25 pm »
Quote
Jim - 22/9/2006  10:07 AM

Of course.  It is all solids.   Look at Pegasus, Taurus, Minotaur and Scout times

Taurus, Minotaur, and Pegasus can take more than 10 minutes to reach orbit, depending on coast intervals, while M-V is getting there in less than 6 minutes.  Scout was definitely "quicker" than M-V and may hold the time-to-orbit record, if there is such a thing.  I think some of the early Scouts reached orbit in less than four minutes.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #27 on: 09/22/2006 06:28 pm »
09/23  03:07

It is 3.5 hours to liftoff. Launch angle setting operation starts.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #28 on: 09/22/2006 07:01 pm »
09/23  03:36

"Bigdoor" of Assembling Tower opens and Launcher with M-V rocket now comes out of Assembling Tower.

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #29 on: 09/22/2006 07:58 pm »
09/23  04:37

Launch angle has been set up toward the launch azimuth.
As SOLAR-B is to be put off onto polar orbit, M-V rocket is launched toward south.

Offline Justin Space

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #30 on: 09/22/2006 08:08 pm »
Not all that big a vehicle from the appearance in those images.

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #31 on: 09/22/2006 08:27 pm »
09/23  05:09

Liftoff is scheduled 6:36 AM JST. It is one and half hour to liftoff.  
Launch operation is going well.

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #32 on: 09/22/2006 08:43 pm »
Quote
Justin Space - 22/9/2006  2:51 PM

Not all that big a vehicle from the appearance in those images.

This is the last flight of the M-V according to JAXA. Does anyone knows wich launch vehicle comes next?

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #33 on: 09/22/2006 08:44 pm »

Offline edkyle99

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #34 on: 09/22/2006 08:44 pm »
Quote
Justin Space - 22/9/2006  2:51 PM

Not all that big a vehicle from the appearance in those images.

She's 30.8 meters tall (about 9 meters shorter than Delta II), 2.5 meters in diameter (slightly fatter than a Delta II core), and weighs something approaching 140 tonnes at liftoff.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #35 on: 09/22/2006 08:47 pm »
Got a link to the webcast, Jacques?

Offline edkyle99

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #36 on: 09/22/2006 08:48 pm »
Quote
Satori - 22/9/2006  3:26 PM

Quote
Justin Space - 22/9/2006  2:51 PM

Not all that big a vehicle from the appearance in those images.

This is the last flight of the M-V according to JAXA. Does anyone knows wich launch vehicle comes next?

There's talk of developing a vehicle based on the H-IIA SRB-A monolithic solid rocket motor to replace the segmented motor now used by M-V.  The M-V upper stages might survive.  

I don't think that we will see an M-V replacement for a few years.  One prospective M-V payload that was supposed to fly in 2010 has been transferred to H-IIA.

 - Ed Kyle

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #37 on: 09/22/2006 08:49 pm »

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #38 on: 09/22/2006 08:52 pm »
Quote
edkyle99 - 22/9/2006  3:31 PM

I don't think that we will see an M-V replacement for a few years.  One prospective M-V payload that was supposed to fly in 2010 has been transferred to H-IIA.

 - Ed Kyle

So this is the last launch from Uchinoura, Kagoshima, for many years. This is the second launch center that is going inactive this year after GIK-2 Svobodniy in Russia.

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #39 on: 09/22/2006 08:57 pm »

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #40 on: 09/22/2006 09:04 pm »
Got to love these JAXA webcasts. :)

Offline MKremer

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #41 on: 09/22/2006 09:07 pm »
Quote
Chris Bergin - 22/9/2006  3:47 PM

Got to love these JAXA webcasts. :)

Catchy music ;)
(actually some of the music isn't half bad)

Offline Justin Space

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #42 on: 09/22/2006 09:12 pm »
Kenny G and JAXA present..... ;)

Offline MKremer

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #43 on: 09/22/2006 09:15 pm »
That's a nice payload processing facility.

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #44 on: 09/22/2006 09:17 pm »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #45 on: 09/22/2006 09:24 pm »
30 min to go....

Offline edkyle99

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #46 on: 09/22/2006 09:26 pm »
Nifty how the entire launch vehicle *rotates* out of the tower on the launcher arm.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #47 on: 09/22/2006 09:40 pm »
L-15 minutes.

Very nice history of Japanese launch vehicles on the webcast.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #48 on: 09/22/2006 09:47 pm »
T-5 minutes. No sign of any problems.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #49 on: 09/22/2006 09:50 pm »
T-2mins.

Offline MKremer

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #50 on: 09/22/2006 09:51 pm »
Anyone understand Japanese? :)

Offline MKremer

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #51 on: 09/22/2006 09:52 pm »
I thought that was wind noise. Or maybe it's some kind of drum soundtrack instead.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #52 on: 09/22/2006 09:55 pm »
LAUNCH.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #53 on: 09/22/2006 09:56 pm »
That was a long, long countdown!!!

Anyone know what that smoke was all about at about T-10 seconds. Never seen that on a solid before.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #54 on: 09/22/2006 09:58 pm »
Stage seperation 1/2.

Third stage ignition. This thing doesn't take long to get uphill (as mentioned earlier).

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #55 on: 09/22/2006 09:59 pm »
I'd guess it's the gas generator for the TVC on the first stage.

Offline MKremer

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #56 on: 09/22/2006 09:59 pm »
That smoke might have been for the type of TVC power source they use. (something like an SRB APU?)

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #57 on: 09/22/2006 10:00 pm »

Offline edkyle99

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #58 on: 09/22/2006 10:00 pm »
Quote
Chris Bergin - 22/9/2006  4:39 PM

That was a long, long countdown!!!

Anyone know what that smoke was all about at about T-10 seconds. Never seen that on a solid before.

I believe it has something to do with the thrust vector control system, but don't know the details.

 - Ed Kyle

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #59 on: 09/22/2006 10:01 pm »
That sure was a mighty quick launch. :)

Wonder what kind of g-forces the payload has to be designed for?

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #60 on: 09/22/2006 10:01 pm »
And I believe the flashy graphic and strange goings on with the cartoon is space craft seperation.

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #61 on: 09/22/2006 10:04 pm »

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #62 on: 09/22/2006 10:11 pm »
09/23 06:47

Tracking of SOLAR-B / M-V rocket from Masuda tracking station has been ended.

---------
09/23 06:45

Tracking of SOLAR-B / M-V rocket from Uchinoura tracking station has been ended.

---------
09/23 06:40

202 seconds after liftoff, third stage nozzle has been extended, and third stage motor has been ignited.

--------
09/23 06:39

200 seconds after liftoff, second and third stages have been separated.

---------
09/23 06:39

186 seconds after liftoff, nose fairing has been open and jettisoned.

-----------
09/23 06:37

75 seconds after liftoff, first stage has been separated, and second stage has been ignited.

---------

09/23 06:36 :

At 6:36 AM(JST), Sep. 23, 2006, M-V rocket No.7 has been launched from Uchinoura Space Center.

Offline edkyle99

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #63 on: 09/22/2006 10:11 pm »
Didn't I see on the broadcast that spacecraft separation confirmation won't come until 7:40 JST (22:40 UTC)?

 - Ed Kyle

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #64 on: 09/22/2006 10:13 pm »
09/23 06:53

Perth station in Australia captured the signal of SOLAR-B.


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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #66 on: 09/22/2006 10:45 pm »
Any new designation for the Solar-B?

Offline MKremer

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #67 on: 09/23/2006 01:14 am »
The lastest info from JAXA:

"Santiago Station tracked SOLAR-B satellite, and confirmed satellite separation and solar panel deployment. M-V-7 vehicle has succeeded in orbit injection of SOLAR-B satellite."

So it looks like a successful launch. We'll just have to wait for more news about its health and the instrument checkouts.

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #68 on: 09/23/2006 04:37 am »
Quote
Satori - 22/9/2006  6:28 PM

Any new designation for the Solar-B?

The Japanese version of the JAXA web site has given the name as  "upsilon-squiggle funny-squiggle tau-double-prime-squiggle". Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the
name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.
 - Jonathan McDowell
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline hektor

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #69 on: 09/23/2006 07:14 am »
Any news about the two other payloads, in particular the solar sail ?

Offline SimonShuttle

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #70 on: 09/23/2006 11:49 am »
Quote
jcm - 22/9/2006  11:20 PM

Quote
Satori - 22/9/2006  6:28 PM

Any new designation for the Solar-B?

The Japanese version of the JAXA web site has given the name as  "upsilon-squiggle funny-squiggle tau-double-prime-squiggle". Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the
name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.
 - Jonathan McDowell

I've translated your comment too Jon, and I've come to the conclusion you are cleverer than me :)

Online eeergo

Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #71 on: 09/23/2006 12:13 pm »
For those wondering when the MV replacement would be operational, according to this link http://www.spaceflightnow.com/m5/solarb/ in 2010 a new rocket will be ready.
-DaviD-

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #72 on: 09/23/2006 01:04 pm »
M-V rocket 7 it depends on the machine
The 22nd number scientific satellite (SOLAR-B) about the launch experimental result

2006 September 23rd
Space aeronautics research and development mechanism


Space aeronautics research and development mechanism, 2006 September 23rd 06:36 (the Japan standard time), from the Uchinoura outer space observatory the 22nd number scientific satellite (SOLAR-B) the M-V rocket 7 which is loaded the machine (the M-V-7 number machine), launched 82.0 degree at launcher setting angles of elevation and azimuth 149.3 degree.

The M-V-7 number machine flew normally, after the 3rd step motor burn out, verified that it is thrown to height approximately 280km, apogee high-level approximately 686km and tracked inclination 98.3 degree.

In addition, the signal reception from SOLAR-B was started, at  07:21 (the Japan standard time), SOLAR-B was separated from the rocket by this signal, the solar paddle (PDL) verified that it is developed normally.


Profound gratitude is displayed in the related each direction which cooperates to the latest M-V-7 number machine launch execution.

 
Space aeronautics research and development mechanism public information section
TEL: 03-6266-6413 - 6417
FAX: 03-6266-6910
The Kagoshima Space Center Uchinoura outer space observatory Public Information Section
TEL: 0994-31-6978 (representation)
 

Offline edkyle99

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #73 on: 09/23/2006 02:20 pm »
Many new higher resolution M-5-7 launch photos are now on-line at:

http://jda.jaxa.jp/jda/p3_e.php?mode=level&time=N&genre=1&category=1010

 - Ed Kyle


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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #74 on: 09/23/2006 07:10 pm »
Quote
jcm - 23/9/2006  8:20 AM

Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.

Jonathan, Solar-B satellite has gotten a name Hinode (or sunrise), according to http://www.spacedaily.com/2006/060923062547.528fiewg.html

P.S.: I was very glad to see you in Moscow yesterday!... :)

Offline jcm

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #75 on: 09/24/2006 03:31 am »
Quote
anik - 23/9/2006  2:53 PM

Quote
jcm - 23/9/2006  8:20 AM

Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.

Jonathan, Solar-B satellite has gotten a name Hinode (or sunrise), according to http://www.spacedaily.com/2006/060923062547.528fiewg.html

P.S.: I was very glad to see you in Moscow yesterday!... :)

Andrey, it was great to see you too. Thanks for the update (just back online at home after 20 hours on the road). - Jonathan

The following from a US scientist at the launch:
 The Solar-B, now named Hinode
(E-no-day), launched from Uchinoura Space Center at exactly 6:36 am
Japan time, 5:36 pm Eastern Time.  The last M-V launch vehicle
performed flawlessly.  The satellite achieved an orbit with a reported
682 km apogee, at the top end of the rocket's performance curve.  The
satellite successfully separated from the 3rd stage engine, deployed
the solar arrays as planned, and acquired Sun pointing within 2
minutes of the command.  Solar Array output was reported above 100%.
Hinode has come into the satellite world in a very healthy way.  The
three project managers are extremely tired, but will recover.  Early
indications show reasonable temperatures on the sensors close to
instruments to be nominal with no expected near term temperature
crises looming.

-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline hektor

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #76 on: 09/28/2006 06:35 pm »
So no news from the solar sail experiment ?

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #77 on: 10/31/2006 08:00 am »
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                     ***  JAXA MAIL SERVICE  ***
                 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
            Hinode Early Operations and Near-Future Plans

                                                October 31, 2006 (JST)
                             Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
                     National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ)
                  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
               Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC)
                             
The sun-observing Hinode satellite (formerly Solar-B) of the Japan
Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) was launched from the Uchinoura
Space Center, Kagoshima Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan, on September 22,
2006 at 21:36 GMT, aboard the seventh in JAXA's series of M-V rockets.
For two weeks the satellite carried out orbit adjustments, and is now
in a sun-synchronous orbit, which allows it to observe the sun for
uninterrupted periods lasting months at a time.Hinode contains three
instruments dedicated to observing the sun: the Solar Optical
Telescope (SOT), the X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and the EUV Imaging
Spectrometer (EIS).Each of the instruments have now opened their
protective doors and successfully commenced test observations.
Consequently, JAXA announces that the primary post-launch events of
the satellite have been completed.

Currently, Hinode's power systems and attitude pointing are stable.For
approximately the next month, activities will progress from testing
the basic operational aspects of the telescopes, to implementing the
scientific operation mode.During this period, from time to time we
plan to release images and telescope-performance information on the
homepage for each instrument, or through other sources.We expect to
complete adjustments of the instruments and enter the scientific
observation phase of the mission early in December 2006.At that time
we intend to release a summary of initial scientific findings obtained
from the test images.

Below is an outline of the initial instrument performance and plans
for near-future Hinode activities.


1) SOT opened its front door on October 25, and immediately began
   taking engineering test images and performing focus adjustments.
   Attachment 1 shows an image taken during this testing phase with
   SOT's broadband filter.From this and similar images we have
   confirmed that SOT is achieving very high spatial resolution of 0.2
   arcseconds, a primary objective of the instrument.We also have
   determined that the spectropolarimeter, SOT's primary instrument
   for detailed measurements of the solar magnetic field, is exceeding
   its expected levels of performance.Currently, however, proper
   performance of SOT's narrowband filter is limited to only a portion
   of the filter's field of view.The SOT instrument team is
   investigating measures to overcome this issue.

2) Shortly after launch, XRT experienced unexpectedly high
   temperatures near the front of the telescope tube.This resulted in
   its front door opening earlier than expected.Nonetheless, it
   successfully commenced taking high quality test images on October
   23, and has been performing well ever since (attachment 2).We have
   verified that the telescope is meeting its expected level of
   performance, and the test images show that its observing
   capabilities exceed those of the highly successful soft X-ray
   telescope of the Yohkoh satellite, with spatial resolution reaching
   nearly 1 arcsecond.

3) EIS opened its door on October 28 and immediately began taking
   "spectroscopic imaging" data, allowing us to verify that it is
   operating properly.This instrument takes spectroscopic images using
   either a spectroscopic slit or a wider "slot." Data from EIS
   consist of mixed positional and wavelength information.We plan to
   release more complete test images after completing the analysis
   needed to extract the imaging information from the raw data.A
   preliminary spectral image is shown in attachment 3.


Figure 1: SOT First Light image.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic01
Figure 2: An image of the sun's corona from XRT.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic02
Figure 3: First Light results from EIS.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic03
Reference images for Figure 2: (1 and 2) Full-disk solar images from XRT.
(3) Comparison between Hinode/XRT and Yohkoh/SXT coronal images.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#at02

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Publisher : Public Affairs Department
            Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
            Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
            1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
            Japan
            TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

Offline jacqmans

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Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #78 on: 12/06/2007 07:32 pm »
RELEASE: 07-264

SPACECRAFT REVEALS NEW INSIGHTS ABOUT THE ORIGIN OF SOLAR WIND

WASHINGTON - Images from NASA-funded telescopes aboard a Japanese
satellite have shed new light about the sun's magnetic field and the
origins of solar wind, which disrupts power grids, satellites and
communications on Earth.

Data from the Hinode satellite shows that magnetic waves play a
critical role in driving the solar wind into space. The solar wind is
a stream of electrically charged gas that is propelled away from the
sun in all directions at speeds of almost 1 million miles per hour.
Better understanding of the solar wind may lead to more accurate
prediction of damaging radiation waves before they reach satellites.
Findings by American-led international teams of researchers appear in
the Dec. 7 issue of the journal SCIENCE.

How the solar wind is formed and powered has been the subject of
debate for decades. Powerful magnetic Alfv?n waves in the
electrically charged gas near the sun have always been a leading
candidate as a force in the formation of solar wind since Alfv?n
waves in principle can transfer energy from the sun's surface up
through its atmosphere, or corona, into the solar wind.

In the solar atmosphere, Alfv?n waves are created when convective
motions and sound waves push magnetic fields around, or when dynamic
processes create electrical currents that allow the magnetic fields
to change shape or reconnect.

"Until now, Alfv?n waves have been impossible to observe because of
limited resolution of available instruments," said Alexei Pevtsov,
Hinode program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington. "With the
help of Hinode, we are now able to see direct evidence of Alfv?n
waves, which will help us unravel the mystery of how the solar wind
is powered."

Using Hinode's high resolution X-ray telescope, a team led by Jonathan
Cirtain, a solar physicist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center,
Huntsville, Ala., was able to peer low into the corona at the sun's
poles and observe record numbers of X-ray jets. The jets are
fountains of rapidly moving hot plasma. Previous research detected
only a few jets daily.

With Hinode's higher sensitivity, Cirtain's team observed an average
of 240 jets per day. They conclude that magnetic reconnection, a
process where two oppositely charged magnetic fields collide and
release energy, is frequently occurring in the low solar corona. This
interaction forms both Alfv?n waves and the burst of energized plasma
in X-ray jets.

"These observations show a clear relationship between magnetic
reconnection and Alfv?n wave formation in the X-ray jets." said
Cirtain. "The large number of jets, coupled with the high speeds of
the outflowing plasma, lends further credence to the idea that X-ray
jets are a driving force in the creation of the fast solar wind."

Another research team led by Bart De Pontieu, a solar physicist at
Lockheed Martin's Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto,
Calif., focused on the sun's chromosphere, the region sandwiched
between the solar surface and its corona. Using extremely
high-resolution images from Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope, De
Pontieu's team found that the chromosphere is riddled with Alfv?n
waves. When the waves leak into the corona, they are strong enough to
power the solar wind.

"We find that most of these Alfv?n waves have periods of several
minutes, much longer than many theoretical models have assumed in the
past," says De Pontieu. Comparisons with advanced computer
simulations from the University of Oslo, Norway, indicate that
reconnection is not the only source of the Alfv?n waves. "The
simulations imply that many of the waves occur when the sun's
magnetic field is jostled around by convective motions and sound
waves in the low atmosphere," continued De Pontieu.

Hinode was launched in September 2006 to study the sun's magnetic
field and how its explosive energy propagates through the different
layers of the solar atmosphere. It is a collaborative mission with
NASA and the space agencies of Japan, the United Kingdom, Norway and
Europe and Japan's National Astronomical Observatory. Marshall
manages science operations and managed the development of the
scientific instrumentation provided for the mission by NASA, industry
and other federal agencies. The Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology
Center, Palo Alto, Calif., is the lead U.S. investigator for the
Solar Optical Telescope. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory,
Cambridge, Mass. is the lead U.S. investigator for the X-Ray
Telescope.

To view images about these findings and learn more about Hinode,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/solar-b


-end-

Offline jacqmans

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RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #79 on: 12/07/2007 02:55 pm »
Spectacular images and data from the Hinode mission have shed new light on the Sun's magnetic field and the origins of solar wind, which can disrupt power grids, satellites and communications on Earth.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMGUB29R9F_index_0.html

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