Author Topic: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)  (Read 482923 times)

Online catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #700 on: 08/03/2016 08:06 pm »
August 03, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-094
NASA Invites Media to Journey to Mars Showcase on Aug. 18


Media are invited Thursday, Aug. 18, to interview experts from across NASA and industry about the science, technology and human spaceflight activities that are making the agency’s Journey to Mars possible.

The day will begin at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and parts of the Orion spacecraft are being manufactured, and will end the day at a test firing of SLS’s powerful RS-25 engine at the agency’s Stennis Space Center, near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Transportation will be provided for media travelling between Michoud and Stennis to cover both parts of this showcase event.

To participate, media must contact Kathryn Hambleton for credentials at 202-358-1100 or [email protected] no later than 5 p.m. EDT, Friday, Aug. 12.

NASA experts will be available for one-on-one interviews with media about technologies needed to explore the Red Planet, including SLS, Orion and ground systems operations, as well as habitat and lander development, landing site selection, propulsion, advanced manufacturing, robotic exploration, and more.

Media will have the opportunity to:

. get a behind-the-scenes look at what NASA is doing in science, technology, and human spaceflight to prepare for deep space travel
. view manufacturing of the core stage, the largest part of NASA's new deep space rocket
see the next Orion structure being manufactured -- the Orion that will be used for structural testing of the design which will take humans beyond Earth orbit
. speak with representatives from NASA and industry partners creating the capabilities to send humans to Mars
. witness a firing of the RS-25 engine, part of the SLS core stage
. tour rocket engine facilities at Stennis
. visit the B-2 test stand that is being renovated for SLS core stage testing


NASA is on an ambitious Journey to Mars that includes sending humans to the Red Planet in the 2030s. The agency’s robotic spacecraft are leading the way on Mars with two active rovers, three active orbiters, the planned launch of the InSight lander in 2018, and development of the Mars 2020 rover. SLS and Orion will launch together, for the first time, in 2018 and be capable of sending humans farther from Earth than ever before, including to an asteroid and Mars.

For more information about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/journeytomars

-end-

Picture Credits: NASA
A liquid hydrogen tank weld confidence article (left) for the core stage of NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, recently was completed on the Vertical Assembly Center at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
« Last Edit: 08/03/2016 08:12 pm by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #701 on: 08/03/2016 09:03 pm »
First Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrives for Testing at Kennedy Space Center
August 3, 2016, Linda Herridge

The first of two Tail Service Mast Umbilicals (TSMUs) for NASA’s Space Launch System arrived at Kennedy Space Center in Florida from Precision Fabrication and Cleaning in Cocoa. The TSMU was moved to the Launch Equipment Test Facility, where it will undergo testing to ensure it functions properly.

Both TSMUs will connect from the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher to the SLS rocket core stage aft section. The 33-feet-tall umbilicals will provide liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen fluid lines and electrical cable connections to the SLS core stage engine section to support propellant handling during prelaunch operations. Before launch, both TSMUs will tilt back to ensure a safe and reliable disconnect and retract of all umbilical hardware away from the rocket during liftoff.

Kennedy’s Engineering Directorate, along with the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, are supporting testing of all of the umbilicals that will attach from the tower on the mobile launcher to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1 and deep-space missions, including the journey to Mars.

Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

https://blogs.nasa.gov/groundsystems/2016/08/03/first-tail-service-mast-umbilical-arrives-for-testing-at-kennedy-space-center/

Online catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #702 on: 08/04/2016 03:24 am »
View Platform Installation Midpoint in 360-degree View

NASAKennedy

Published on Aug 3, 2016
Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, platform installation reached the midpoint in High Bay 3, with installation of the F north and south platforms.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=at3cCCstD2Q?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline sdsds

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #703 on: 08/04/2016 06:21 am »
GAO says:
"GAO recommends that NASA should reevaluate cost and schedule reserves as part of its integrated design review for the first flight test in order to maximize all remaining cost and schedule reserves. NASA concurred with GAO's recommendation."

If the worst criticism of a program is that the reserves might not be big enough? That's actually a pretty glowing report!
-- sdsds --

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #704 on: 08/04/2016 10:22 am »
Fiso podcast on SLS.

http://spirit.as.utexas.edu/~fiso/telecon/Sanders-Fuller-DaLee_8-3-16/

Costs aside there is lot to be said for being able to deliver 45t and 10m dia payloads direct to Mars , plus greatly reduce travel time for outer solar system robotic missions.



Sent from my SM-T810 using Tapatalk


Online catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #705 on: 08/16/2016 04:22 pm »
Done in 60 seconds: See a Massive Rocket Fuel Tank Built in A Minute

NASA's Marshall Center

Published on Aug 16, 2016
It took a lot longer than 60 seconds to weld the massive 130-foot rocket fuel tank. This time-lapse video shows the construction and rotation of the liquid hydrogen tank for the core stage of NASA’s Space Launch System rocket -- the new heavy-lift rocket being built in the Vehicle Assembly Center at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. There are two views, looking down as the tank is assembled and then looking up. The hydrogen tank comprises nearly two-thirds of the length of the 212-foot-long core stage and will help quench the thirst of the four RS-25 engines that, along with the twin solid rocket boosters, will launch the Orion spacecraft and carry crew to deep space destination and eventually Mars. This qualification tank will be moved to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for structural testing. Testing ensures the flight articles will be able to sustain the extreme forces experienced during launch. Tanks and other parts of the core stage that will be flown on the maiden flight of SLS and Orion are also under construction at Michoud. For more about NASA’s Space Launch System, visit www.nasa.gov/sls.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IcPrSIjxnc?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #706 on: 08/19/2016 11:05 pm »
Plugging Away Inside Massive SLS Fuel Tank: Welders Complete Final Plug Fusion Welds on SLS Liquid Hydrogen Tank

Welders inside a large liquid hydrogen tank for NASA's Space Launch System at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans are plugging holes left after the tank was assembled. Using frictional heating and forging pressure, friction stir welding produces high-strength bonds virtually free of defects.
 
The process transforms metals from a solid state into a "plastic-like" state and uses a rotating pin tool to soften, stir and forge a bond between two metal sections to form a uniform welded joint. At the beginning and end of each weld, holes remain where the rotating pin tool enters and exits the metal. Six 22-foot-tall barrels and two domed caps were joined together to create the qualification test article, which measures an astounding 27.5 feet in diameter and over 130 feet long.
 
Qualification test articles, like the one shown here, closely replicate flight hardware and are built using identical processing procedures. The liquid hydrogen tank, a liquid oxygen tank, four RS-25 engines and other elements form SLS's core stage, which also serves as the rocket's structural backbone.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/28469347553

Photo Credit: NASA/SBSEIPEL, taken August 5, 2016

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #707 on: 09/13/2016 09:59 pm »
Preparing America for Deep Space Exploration Episode 14: Fired Up

NASA Johnson

Published on Sep 13, 2016
NASA is pressing full steam ahead toward sending humans farther than ever before. Take a look at the work being done by teams across the nation for NASA’s deep space human exploration programs, including the Space Launch System, Orion and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Programs, as they continue to propel human spaceflight into the next generation. Highlights from the second quarter of 2016 included the installation of platforms in NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Vehicle Assembly Building in preparation for launch vehicle processing, relocation of the Orion crew module to prepare for propulsion tube welding and the second ground-based qualification test of the Space Launch System’s five-segment booster.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgFeAcnF9tY?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #708 on: 09/16/2016 11:04 pm »
Inside KSC! Sept. 16, 2016

Inside KSC! Sept. 16, 2016

Published on Sep 16, 2016
One of the aft skirts that will become part of the Exploration Mission 1 stack was moved to the Booster Fabrication Facility at Kennedy. Another vital element for the EM-1 mission, the processing bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the massive booster and spacecraft will be stacked, also continues to take shape.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boDt0odsZBY?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #709 on: 09/19/2016 08:10 pm »
Piece by Piece: Building Space Launch System’s Core Stage, September 19, 2016
http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/piece-by-piece-building-sls-core-stage

Caption: Engineers just completed welding the liquid hydrogen tank that will provide fuel for the first SLS flight in 2018. (my bold) The tank measures more than 130 feet tall, comprises almost two-thirds of the core stage and holds 537,000 gallons of liquid hydrogen -- which is cooled to minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit.
Credits: NASA/Michoud/Steven Seipel


The largest rocket stage in the world is coming together piece by piece at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. Large elements for NASA's Space Launch System are in production and will be joined together to create the rocket's 212-foot-tall core stage, the backbone of the SLS rocket.

Why is NASA building the largest rocket ever manufactured? Because SLS is ready to support both near-term missions in the proving ground around the moon starting in 2018, while at the same time being capable of carrying the very large hardware like landers, habitats and other supplies and equipment needed to explore Mars and other deep space destinations in the 2030s and beyond.

To power a Mars rocket, the core stage carries around 2.3 million pounds of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to fuel the four RS-25 engines. Engineers just completed welding the largest part of the core stage, the 130-foot-tall liquid hydrogen tank that will provide fuel for the first SLS flight in 2018, but there’s still work to ready the tank for its maiden voyage.


Caption: The liquid oxygen tank is the second tank that makes up the core stage, which towers more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet. The liquid oxygen tank holds 196,000 gallons of the rocket's oxidizer -- liquid oxygen -- which is cooled to minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit. Earlier in the year, engineers completed the liquid oxygen confidence article, which is identical to the test and flight version of the tank that will be welded in the coming weeks.
Credits: NASA/Michoud/Steven Seipel


"Building the core stage is similar to building a house," said Joan Funk, SLS core stage lead at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. "With the massive, welded elements coming off the Vertical Assembly Center at Michoud, we've laid the foundation, framed the walls and put up the roof. The big items are in place. Now it's time to get to work on the inside." That's where engineers will clean and prime each element before beginning the internal integration.

Michoud's Vertical Assembly Center, the largest spacecraft-welding tool in the world, is welding many of the core stage's main elements -- the forward skirt, the liquid oxygen tank, the liquid hydrogen tank and the engine section. The core stage's fifth element, the intertank, which is bolted, is also being built at Michoud. The Boeing Company, headquartered in Chicago, is the prime contractor building the core stage, but to build the stage, Boeing has worked with 442 businesses across America, including 297 small businesses.

“When welding is complete, these structures still have to go through more processing to turn them into functional parts of the rocket,” said Funk. “The core stage has parts with very different functions from housing the flight computer and primary avionics to holding the fuel to supporting the four RS-25 engines.”

The final manufacturing processes and outfitting for each part of the core stage varies with the section’s function. Wet structures -- elements that hold fuel, or the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks -- are put through "proof tests" to assure manufacturing quality. The liquid oxygen tank is hydrostatically tested and filled with water; and the liquid hydrogen tank is pneumatically tested.


Caption: Where the rubber meets the road, the engine section is the business end of the core stage. It houses the four RS-25 engines -- formerly space shuttle main engines, the most reliable rocket engines ever built -- that produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust during launch. The engine section also houses the avionics used to steer the engines and is an attachment point for the solid rocket boosters.
Credits: NASA/Michoud/Steven Seipel


After testing, the tanks and dry structures -- elements that don't hold fuel, or the forward skirt, intertank and engine section -- are cleaned, primed and readied for the "work on the inside." Much like a house being constructed, the core stage is outfitted with wiring, plumbing and insulation.

The dry structures house flight computers, cameras and avionics -- or the "brains" of the rocket. In a house, wiring can carry power or television and internet data from room to room. In the SLS's core stage, 45 miles of wire cabling serves a similar purpose, carrying power and data from element to element powering flight computers, cameras, sensors, avionics and other electronics housed in the dry structures.

The core stage's plumbing contains lines that deliver the propellant and oxidizer from the tanks to the engines. Each dry structure also contains purge vent lines and hazardous gas lines designed to eliminate dangerous gases building up in the dry structures prior to launch.

"The dry structures are cram-packed full of equipment and the domes of the tanks take up a lot of the room inside the dry structures," said Funk. Racks, cameras, sensors, vent lines, wire cabling, valves, shelves, couplings, and more fill the core stage's dry structures to near capacity. With every inch planned, equipment is mounted and wiring is placed methodically, accounting for time, space, accessibility and much more. When the dry structures are ready to be "stacked," or joined to the other elements, there isn't much room to spare.


Caption: Ratana Meekham, a Qualis Corp. engineering technician at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, helps install approximately 5 miles of cable on a half-ring structure being used to test the avionics system that will guide the SLS. The forward skirt, intertank and engine section contain the rocket's avionics and electronics.
Credits: NASA/MSFC/Fred Deaton


Before the elements can be stacked, insulation -- which is more important to a rocket than to a house -- is applied. Not only does NASA's thermal protection system give the rocket its signature orange color, but more importantly, it protects the core stage from the extreme temperatures encountered during launch and maintains the fuels' extremely low temperatures. The liquid hydrogen is chilled to minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit and the liquid oxygen is chilled to minus 297 degrees.

How do those elements finally come together to form the 212-foot-long core stage? With the initial wiring, plumbing and insulation complete, the elements are divided into two sections for stacking. Each section is stacked vertically, with elements bolted to one another using segmented support rings welded to each element, providing stiffness. The liquid hydrogen tank sits atop the engine section to create the aft section, and the forward skirt and intertank are bolted to the top and bottom of the liquid oxygen tank to create the forward section.

When complete, engineers "break over" the sections, or move them to a horizontal position, for their final assembly. Final wiring, plumbing and insulation are installed after the forward section is joined to the aft to complete the core stage assembly.

Before punching its ticket to launch, the core stage will travel by barge to NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where it will undergo a free modal test to understand the structure then be mounted in the recently renovated B-2 Test Stand for propellant fill and drain testing and hot fire testing called a “green run.” A green run, or the first time the engines are assembled into a single configuration with the core stage and fired at nearly full-power, tests the compatibility and functionality of the system to ensure a safe and viable design.

Once post-test assessments and adjustments are complete, the core stage will travel again by barge to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, for its first flight with Orion.
« Last Edit: 09/20/2016 01:38 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #710 on: 09/29/2016 08:25 pm »
assume this is the right place for this...NASA has posted an RFP for the SLS Universal Stage Adapter, which will be used for the EUS equipped variant of SLS to adapt the EUS to Orion and to encapsulate any co-manifested payload.

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=7dbf1cb585adff0e8f71dec0059b2809&_cview=0

 

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #711 on: 09/30/2016 07:36 pm »
Additional pictures of the core stage tank and Orion adapter.

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #712 on: 09/30/2016 09:56 pm »
NASA Marshall Public Affairs has provided additional images from Steven Seipel of the LH2 tank flight article move out of the VAC over to Cell A.

Credits: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #713 on: 09/30/2016 09:57 pm »
Credits: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #714 on: 09/30/2016 09:58 pm »
Credits: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #715 on: 09/30/2016 09:59 pm »
Credit: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

Offline Mark S

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #716 on: 10/02/2016 12:34 am »
Credit: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

I'm a little bit worried about the numbering scheme. With only six digits in the tank's serial number, as soon as they build the millionth tank, they will have to rewrite all their inventory tracking software. This could prove a major disruption in SLS production.

:)


Offline TrevorMonty

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #717 on: 10/02/2016 08:14 am »
Credit: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel

I'm a little bit worried about the numbering scheme. With only six digits in the tank's serial number, as soon as they build the millionth tank, they will have to rewrite all their inventory tracking software. This could prove a major disruption in SLS production.

:)
They could've got away with 2 digits, even that might be optimistic.

Online jacqmans

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #718 on: 10/06/2016 03:38 pm »
Summer of Testing Concludes for NASA’s Journey to Mars

Washington, D.C., October 6, 2016 –NASA and the agency’s industry team for the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft are concluding a successful summer of testing in preparation for the first integrated flight. The uncrewed, three-week mission, currently designated Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), is scheduled for late 2018. During the mission, SLS will send Orion about 40,000 miles beyond the moon during a flight that will be farther from Earth than any spacecraft built to carry humans has ever traveled.

“Crew safety is the highest priority as NASA prepares to send astronauts into deep space and eventually Mars,” said Tony Antonelli, Lockheed Martin’s chief technologist for civil space exploration programs. “A rigorous flight test program is critical to ensuring all systems are ready for the journey.”

In June, Orbital ATK concluded full-scale solid rocket booster qualification testing at their facility in Promontory, Utah that blasted 3.6 million pounds of thrust during the two minute test – burning approximately 1.4 million pounds of propellant at an average of 5.5 tons per second. The SLS boosters and all data to date show the motors performed as expected. Two five segment boosters will provide initial thrust to boost the SLS and Orion off the launch pad and during its first two-plus minutes of flight. 

Four Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 engines will provide thrust to the core stage during SLS launch and ascent. In July and August, the company conducted tests on the RS-25 development engine 0528 at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. After testing this summer, RS-25 engine 0528 has accumulated 99 starts and 54,572 seconds of hotfire time, including 1,263 seconds of test time dedicated to SLS development. These state of the art engines will operate for a full 8 ½ minutes, to help boost Orion into orbit. Data from this summer, combined with earlier test data, indicate the RS-25 engines will exceed SLS mission requirements. Each engine produces more than 500,000 pounds of thrust.

Boeing, building the core stages in New Orleans, completed welding on the liquid hydrogen tank flight and qualification test articles in the world’s largest welding tool. The tank is part of the core stage, which accounts for the largest section of the rocket at more than 200 feet in height. The qualification tank is being readied at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana for barge transport to NASA’s Marshal Space Flight Center in Huntsville for structural loads testing. As other qualification test elements of the core stage are completed, they will be shipped to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) where the core stage will be assembled for full-up qualification structural loads testing of the massive structure. NASA is completing construction of the tank test stands this fall at MSFC. In addition, NASA accepted delivery of the interim cryogenic propulsion stage test article at MSFC for testing later this year.

“As NASA readies for the next stage of testing, flight hardware for the first mission is in production for both the core stage and the interim cryogenic propulsion stage,” added Jacqueline Nesselroad, director of Boeing operations at Michoud.

On the Orion program, Lockheed Martin engineering teams recently finished proof pressure testing of the EM-1 crew module at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a critical milestone in certifying the structural integrity of the vehicle for its next mission. At the same time, engineers are conducting a series of critical acoustic and vibration tests for the service module at NASA Glenn’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.

In August, the Aerojet Rocketdyne-manufactured jettison motor for Orion’s Launch Abort System successfully test fired 45,000 pounds of thrust at the company’s Sacramento facility. In keeping with the approach of “testing like you fly,” water impact tests have been conducted by NASA and Lockheed Martin at the agency’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. These tests study the effects various water landing impacts will have on the crew to ensure engineers understand splashdown scenarios after the space flight.

Another critical element in ensuring crew safety is Orion’s entry parachute system. The parachutes will slow the capsule down from its high-speed re-entry of 25,000 mph to a relatively gentle 20 mph for splashdown. This fall, the parachute team is beginning qualification tests of the system for human flights, encompassing eight integrated drop tests that will simulate a variety of landing scenarios.

“NASA and the SLS and Orion industry team remain on schedule in executing a highly successful test program as the U.S. maintains space leadership through the Journey to Mars,” said Julie Van Kleeck, vice president of Advanced Space and Launch at Aerojet Rocketdyne. “All of this testing adds up to lowering the risk for astronauts to ensure they arrive and return safely from their destinations.”

To learn more about EM-1, visit www.exploredeepspace.com.
Aerojet Rocketdyne: http://www.rocket.com/rs-25-engine
Boeing: http://www.boeing.com/space/space-launch-system/
Lockheed Martin: www.lockheedmartin.com/orion
Orbital ATK: http://www.orbitalatk.com/flight-systems/propulsion-systems/

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #719 on: 10/07/2016 05:42 pm »
NASA Marshall Public Affairs has provided additional images from Steven Seipel of the LH2 tank flight article move out of the VAC over to Cell A.

Credits: NASA MSFC Image: Steven Seipel
Video of this now posted on YouTube:


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