Author Topic: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)  (Read 483055 times)

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #680 on: 05/12/2016 11:14 am »
The SLS, Orion, and GSDO managers are trying to get the agency to push the EM-1 NET launch date up to September 2018.
(http://spacenews.com/nasa-working-towards-september-2018-slsorion-launch/)

Offline ngilmore

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #681 on: 05/14/2016 06:01 pm »
Not sure where to put this, but the Los Angeles Times has a profile on AMRO with some photos related to SLS and Orion fabrication. AMRO was an early advertiser on this site, so you may recognize the name from that.

"AMRO is probably making more primary structure on the Orion-SLS combined rocket than anybody else," said Steve Doering, who oversees the building of the core stage for NASA.

http://www.latimes.com/science/space/la-me-space-builder-20160513-story.html

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #682 on: 05/19/2016 06:05 pm »
A reminder this is an update thread. Any questions or replies, quote the post and use the discussion thread. I know it'll take two minutes before someone doesn't do that (#InternetProblems)

Anyway:

Article by Chris Gebhardt:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/05/orbital-atk-cislunar-habitat-missions-sls-orion/

Nathan L2 renders included.

Online AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #683 on: 06/13/2016 07:33 pm »
NASA Completes Test Version of SLS Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter
Jennifer Harbaugh - June 13, 2016

A crane lifts the structural test article of the launch vehicle stage adapter (LVSA) after final manufacturing on a 30-foot welding tool at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The LVSA will connect two major sections of the upper part of NASA's Space Launch System -- the core stage and the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) -- for the first flight of the rocket and the Orion spacecraft. SLS will be the world's most powerful rocket and carry astronauts in NASA's Orion spacecraft on deep-space missions, including the journey to Mars.

Later this year at Marshall, the test version of the LVSA will be stacked with other structural test articles of the upper part of SLS. Engineers will examine test data and compare it to computer models to verify the integrity of the hardware and ensure it can withstand the forces it will experience during flight. The hardware's cone shape is due to the ICPS having a smaller diameter than the rocket's core stage. Teledyne Brown Engineering of Huntsville is the prime contractor for the LVSA.

Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/completion-of-test-version-of-LVSA.html

Online AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #684 on: 06/16/2016 07:32 pm »
Tail Service Mast Umbilicals Prepared to Support NASA’s Journey to Mars
June 16, 2016 - Linda Herridge

Several connections, called launch umbilicals, will connect from the mobile launcher tower and provide power, communications, coolant and fuel to NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft for their first integrated mission. Among them are two umbilicals, called tail service mast umbilicals (TSMUs). They are being cleaned and assembled at Precision Fabrication Cleaning in Cocoa, Florida, before they are transported to the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for testing.

Technicians are cleaning the two segments of each umbilical to remove any dirt or debris that may hinder their functionality, checking them for any defects, and then assembling the parts to form two complete umbilicals. They will be transported to Kennedy’s Launch Equipment Test Facility where they will undergo testing to ensure their readiness to support prelaunch operations leading up to launch.

The umbilicals will connect from the zero-level deck on the base of the mobile launcher to the SLS rocket core stage aft section. The 33-foot-tall structures will provide liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen fluid lines and electrical cable connections to the SLS core stage engine section to support propellant handling during prelaunch operations.

At the LETF, engineers and technicians will use liquid nitrogen to simulate the liquid oxygen for the TSMU that will provide liquid oxygen. They will test the umbilical’s arm performance across the full range of SLS core stage motions and simulate a vehicle launch using the Vehicle Motion Simulator test fixture. The same series of tests will be performed with the second TSMU that will provide liquid hydrogen, using the actual liquid hydrogen commodity.

Before launch, both TSMUs will tilt back to ensure a safe and reliable disconnect and retract of all umbilical hardware away from the rocket during liftoff.

Kennedy’s Engineering Directorate, along with the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, are supporting processing activities of the umbilicals for missions to deep space including NASA’s journey to Mars.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/groundsystems/2016/06/16/tail-service-mast-umbilicals-prepared-to-support-nasas-journey-to-mars

More photos at https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasakennedy (all taken June 3, 2016).

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #685 on: 06/24/2016 07:57 pm »
G-level work platforms installed in High Bay 3 of the VAB

NASAKennedy

Published on Jun 24, 2016
Zinnia plants grown on the International Space Station are dissected back on Earth in the Space Station Processing Facility, and the G-level work platforms for NASA's Space Launch System are installed in High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kqdzZcejM0?t=30s

Advance to 30 seconds to view

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #686 on: 06/27/2016 05:52 pm »
We got to see one of the center segments for EM-1 already made at the NASA Social today. Don't know if it's for left or right hand booster. Again this is SLS flight hardware, the 1st segment that came through the final assembly building.
« Last Edit: 06/27/2016 05:53 pm by Bubbinski »
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline CyndyC

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #687 on: 07/14/2016 07:05 pm »
Inside the rehab of the Vehicle Assembly Building for SLS with 25 photos, from Orlando Business Journal

Includes photos of the transporter erector (TE), the crawlerway, the pad, and the flame trench.

Also includes photos of processing Boeing's CST-100 inside the former shuttle facility across from the VAB, and
a photo (#20) of SpaceX pad 39A as viewed from 39B, unfortunately none of which can be downloaded to post in their respective threads.
« Last Edit: 07/14/2016 07:13 pm by CyndyC »
"Either lead, follow, or get out of the way." -- quote of debatable origin tweeted by Ted Turner and previously seen on his desk

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #688 on: 07/15/2016 05:07 am »
I used the SeaMonkey browser to save those images. Right-Click -> View Page Info -> Media -> Select Image -> Save As... Images attached in a zip file.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #689 on: 07/15/2016 01:32 pm »
Screen cap from the Stennis live stream this morning -- a look at construction progress on the B-2 test stand for the Core Stage.  (Reference presentation slide also attached.)
« Last Edit: 07/15/2016 01:32 pm by psloss »

Offline rocketguy101

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #690 on: 07/15/2016 02:47 pm »
I used the SeaMonkey browser to save those images. Right-Click -> View Page Info -> Media -> Select Image -> Save As... Images attached in a zip file.
thanks!  that worked with Firefox too, same methodology.
David

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #691 on: 07/19/2016 07:25 pm »

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #692 on: 07/20/2016 11:34 pm »
NASA Completes First Round of Composite Shell Buckling Tests with a Bang

 
NASA's Marshall Center

Published on Jul 20, 2016
During the test, force is increasingly applied to the top of a composite barrel to evaluate the structural integrity of the test article. The resulting data will help engineers in the design and build of primary structures for future launch vehicles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PQ2Z_HIvfA?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Online Robotbeat

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #693 on: 07/21/2016 01:55 am »
Shouldn't they test these things under pressure?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Offline RotoSequence

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #694 on: 07/21/2016 02:00 am »
Shouldn't they test these things under pressure?

I'll give them the benefit of the doubt and assume they know what they're doing.  ;) That said, the structure buckled at about 3.7 meganewtons. Is it just me, or does that seem a bit low?

Online Robotbeat

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #695 on: 07/21/2016 02:20 am »
I know they know what they're doing. From what I remember, they assume no internal pressure because it's a conservative assumption, but I'd like a better explanation.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Calphor

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #696 on: 07/21/2016 05:03 am »
I know they know what they're doing. From what I remember, they assume no internal pressure because it's a conservative assumption, but I'd like a better explanation.
You are also assuming that this is only for tankage or booster application. There are other structures that may benefit from composites that primarily see line loads.


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Online Robotbeat

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #697 on: 07/21/2016 05:37 pm »
I know they know what they're doing. From what I remember, they assume no internal pressure because it's a conservative assumption, but I'd like a better explanation.
You are also assuming that this is only for tankage or booster application. There are other structures that may benefit from composites that primarily see line loads.


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Certainly, like an interstage or something (aircraft--which ARE usually pressurized--generally aren't cylinders simply loaded in compression like tested here, while boosters are).

But these are the same kind of tests that are used for large isogrid aluminum alloy can crushes. They're using this as a baseline number for vehicle design.

I'd be interested in a fuller explanation of why tests done under pressurization is so rare.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #698 on: 07/27/2016 06:39 pm »
GAO report on SLS (and EGS) "NASA Human Space Exploration: Opportunity Nears to Reassess Launch Vehicle and Ground Systems Cost and Schedule" (GAO-16-612) was posted today:
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-16-612

For reference, the GAO report released on Orion (GAO-16-620) today is noted here:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=38410.msg1564070#msg1564070

Offline Proponent

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #699 on: 07/28/2016 06:09 pm »
GAO report on SLS (and EGS) "NASA Human Space Exploration: Opportunity Nears to Reassess Launch Vehicle and Ground Systems Cost and Schedule" (GAO-16-612) was posted today:
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-16-612

For reference, the GAO report released on Orion (GAO-16-620) today is noted here:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=38410.msg1564070#msg1564070

The concerns identified by Booz Allen Hamilton in 2011 seem to be materializing, and pretty much on the schedule predicted too.

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