Author Topic: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)  (Read 482997 times)

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #660 on: 03/29/2016 09:55 pm »
NASA has completed a major milestone on its journey to Mars and is ready to begin another phase of work on its spaceport of the future, where the next generation of astronauts will launch to Mars and other deep-space destinations.

The agency recently wrapped up a comprehensive and successful review of plans for the facilities and ground support systems that will process the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

“NASA is developing and modernizing the ground systems at Kennedy to safely integrate Orion with SLS, move the vehicle to the pad, and successfully launch it into space,” said Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator of NASA’s Exploration Systems Development Division at the agency’s Headquarters in Washington. “Modernizing the ground systems for our journey to Mars also ensures long-term sustainability and affordability to meet future needs of the multi-use spaceport.”

Over the course of a few months, engineers and experts across the agency reviewed hundreds of documents as part of a comprehensive assessment. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDO), responsible for processing SLS and Orion for flight and ensuring all systems and facilities are ready, completed its critical design review (CDR) of the facilities and ground support systems plans in December 2015.

This was followed in January by the completion of an independent assessment by a Standing Review Board, a team of aerospace experts that assessed program readiness and confirmed the program is on track to complete the engineering design and development process on budget and on schedule.

In the final step before actual fabrication, installation and testing of Kennedy's ground systems, the GSDO program and review board briefed the results of their assessments to NASA’s Agency Program Management Council, led by Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot.

Engineers are transforming Kennedy's launch infrastructure to support the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft. The heavy-lift rocket will be stacked in the Vehicle Assembly Building on the mobile launcher and roll out to Launch Pad 39B atop a modified crawler transporter. The Orion spacecraft will be fueled with propellants in the Multi-Payload Processing Facility at Kennedy prior to stacking atop the rocket. The launch team will use the new command and control system in the firing room as the clock counts down to liftoff of SLS’s first flight.

“The team is working hard and we are making remarkable progress transforming our facilities," said Mike Bolger, GSDO Program Manager. "As we are preparing for NASA's journey to Mars, the outstanding team at the Kennedy Space Center is ensuring that we will be ready to receive SLS and Orion flight hardware and process the vehicle for the first flight in 2018."

The council also heard the results of the Orion CDR, completed at the program level in October 2015. The evaluation assessed the primary systems of the spacecraft, including the capsule’s structures, pyrotechnics, Launch Abort System jettison, guidance, navigation and control and software systems among many other elements.

For the spacecraft’s first mission on the SLS rocket, ESA (European Space Agency) is providing Orion’s service module, which powers, propels, cools and provides consumables like air and water in space. Results from ESA's service module design review, which began this month, will be assessed and incorporated into Orion development and integration plans later this summer. Systems unique to the first crewed flight will be addressed at a review in the fall of 2017.

Progress continues on Orion at NASA facilities across the country. The underlying structure of the crew module arrived at Kennedy in early February for outfitting, which is currently underway. Over the next 18 months, thousands of Orion components will arrive and be installed.

Meanwhile, a structural representation of the service module is being tested at NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, where engineers conducted a successful solar array wing deployment test on Feb. 29 and are preparing for a variety of tests to confirm it can withstand the harsh conditions of launch.

For more information on GSDO, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/groundsystems

For more information on Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #661 on: 03/30/2016 05:09 pm »
https://twitter.com/NASA_go4launch/status/715195695670624256
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Insert Rocket here! #VAB K-Level Platforms extended, showing #GSDO access to process @NASA_SLS and @NASA_Orion

Online jacqmans

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #662 on: 03/31/2016 08:23 am »

Offline psloss

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #663 on: 03/31/2016 02:19 pm »
It's a nice conceptual graphic, but it always jumps out at me that they have the stack rolling out of High Bay 1, rather than High Bay 3.

Offline RicerAmerica1

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #664 on: 04/02/2016 02:18 am »
The following is a trade study developed by the MSFC and JSC on utilizing wind biasing to limit the loads and the total angle of attack of the stack on the day of launch. I wish I could find more background material on the subject but I could only find the presentation.

Enjoy!

Derek
« Last Edit: 04/02/2016 02:18 am by RicerAmerica1 »

Offline RicerAmerica1

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #665 on: 04/02/2016 09:58 am »
An excellent presentation from I believe Oct. 2015 with updates on the Orion/SLS program as well as the US Space program. The presentation doesn't have a lot of ground breaking information, but it does have some very cool graphics and renderings.

Enjoy,

Derek

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #666 on: 04/04/2016 06:53 pm »
https://twitter.com/NASA_go4launch/status/715195695670624256
Quote
Insert Rocket here! #VAB K-Level Platforms extended, showing #GSDO access to process @NASA_SLS and @NASA_Orion

They are raising the first of the J Platforms out of HB4 for installation this week into HB3. The second J Platform is in the foreground in Camera 083.
http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan4large.jpg

Edited to include High Bay 4 (Camera 083)
« Last Edit: 04/04/2016 07:50 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #667 on: 04/05/2016 12:13 am »
Precision Meets Progress in Welding on SLS Liquid Oxygen Tank Hardware

Published on Apr 4, 2016
BY: NASA's Marshall Center

A liquid oxygen tank confidence article for the world’s most powerful rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System, completes final welding on the Vertical Assembly Center at Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two tanks that make up the SLS core stage. Towering more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the core stage will store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines. Confidence hardware verifies weld procedures are working as planned and tooling-to-hardware interfaces are correct. It will also be used in developing the application process for the thermal protection system, which is the insulation foam that gives the tank its orange color. The liquid oxygen tank is the smaller of the two tanks in the core stage. Components of the liquid hydrogen tank confidence article completed welding in February at Michoud. All welding for the SLS core stage for the Block I configuration of the rocket -- including confidence, qualification and flight hardware -- will be done this summer in preparation for its first flight with NASA's Orion spacecraft in 2018.



Updated 4/5/16: Main YouTube Link
« Last Edit: 04/06/2016 12:53 am by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #668 on: 04/05/2016 06:15 pm »
https://twitter.com/NASA_go4launch/status/715195695670624256
Quote
Insert Rocket here! #VAB K-Level Platforms extended, showing #GSDO access to process @NASA_SLS and @NASA_Orion

They are raising the first of the J Platforms out of HB4 for installation this week into HB3. The second J Platform is in the foreground in Camera 083.
http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan4large.jpg

Edited to include High Bay 4 (Camera 083)
The First J Platform is now being lowered into HB3 for Installation today

EDIT: Installation is now finished
« Last Edit: 04/05/2016 08:35 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #669 on: 04/13/2016 07:55 pm »
Space Launch System Scale and Power (Animation)

Published on Apr 13, 2016
NASA's Marshall Center

Animation depicting NASA’s Space Launch System, the world's most powerful rocket for a new era of human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. With its unprecedented capabilities, SLS will launch crews of up to four astronauts in the agency’s Orion spacecraft on missions to explore multiple, deep-space destinations, including Mars. Traveling to deep space requires a large vehicle that can carry huge payloads, and future evolutions of SLS with the exploration upper stage and advanced boosters will increase the rocket’s lift capability and flexibility for multiple types of mission needs.

Tony De La Rosa

Online AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #670 on: 04/22/2016 11:15 pm »
Booster Segment Answers 'Casting' Call for First Flight of SLS
April 22, 2016 - Jennifer Harbaugh

The first of 10 flight segments for the two solid-rocket boosters of NASA’s Space Launch System has been cast at Orbital ATK’s facility in Promontory, Utah.  Casting involves filling the insulated metal case with propellant and allowing it to solidify or “cure” for several days. The hardware, which is the aft segment, will eventually be integrated with four other segments to make up one of the two, five-segment solid rocket boosters for the first flight of SLS in 2018. During this flight, called Exploration Mission-1, SLS will carry an unmanned Orion spacecraft to travel thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of about a three-week mission and help NASA prepare for missions to deep space, including Mars. Orbital ATK is the prime contractor for the boosters.

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/booster-segment-for-first-flight-of-sls.html

Online AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #671 on: 04/22/2016 11:23 pm »
Welding Wonder Completes Hardware for First Flight of NASA's SLS Rocket
April 18, 2016 - Jennifer Harbaugh

Flight hardware for the core stage of the world's most powerful rocket, NASA's Space Launch System, finishes final welding and is moved off the 170-foot-tall Vertical Assembly Center at the agency's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The hardware is for the engine section, and is the first major SLS flight component to finish full welding on the Vertical Assembly Center. The engine section is located at the bottom of the rocket's core stage and will house the four RS-25 engines for the first flight of SLS with NASA's Orion spacecraft in 2018. The SLS core stage will stand at more than 200 feet tall and store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the launch vehicle’s RS-25 engines. A qualification version of the engine section, which also has completed welding on the Vertical Assembly Center at Michoud, will be shipped later this year to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, to undergo structural loads testing on a 50-foot test structure currently under construction. All welding for the core stage of the SLS Block I configuration -- including confidence, qualification and flight hardware -- will be completed this summer. Traveling to deep space requires a large vehicle that can carry huge payloads, and SLS will have the payload capacity needed to carry crew and cargo for those exploration missions, including Mars.

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/welding-wonder-completes-hardware-for-first-flight-of-SLS-rocket

Offline CNYMike

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #672 on: 04/27/2016 04:44 pm »
Space Launch System Scale and Power (Animation)

Published on Apr 13, 2016
NASA's Marshall Center

Animation depicting NASA’s Space Launch System, the world's most powerful rocket for a new era of human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. With its unprecedented capabilities, SLS will launch crews of up to four astronauts in the agency’s Orion spacecraft on missions to explore multiple, deep-space destinations, including Mars. Traveling to deep space requires a large vehicle that can carry huge payloads, and future evolutions of SLS with the exploration upper stage and advanced boosters will increase the rocket’s lift capability and flexibility for multiple types of mission needs.



Who knows if it will be built, but the video is awesome.
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Offline Star One

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #673 on: 04/27/2016 09:14 pm »
Who knows if it will be built, but the video is awesome.
"If"?  It already is being built.

 - Ed Kyle

A bill is not paid until the cheque has cleared.

Block 0 SLS is in a race with Falcon Heavy and Vulcan Heavy. Definitely an "If" until Block 1A with its very heavy payload flies.

It is not in a race at all. Attempts to suggest it is are misguided in my view.

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #674 on: 04/27/2016 09:40 pm »
A PR piece from OA. The whole release can befound here: http://www.orbitalatk.com/news-room/feature-stories/EM1_Casting/default.aspx?prid=137
Quote
Progress is being made every day on NASA’s Journey To Mars. Orbital ATK recently completed casting the SLS aft booster segment for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft, EM-1. Casting involves filling the rocket motor case with propellant and allowing it to cure for several days. EM-1 will launch in 2018, powered by two Orbital ATK five-segment solid rocket boosters.

The six year old in me wonders if I can lick the giant beaters...

Offline Mark S

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #675 on: 04/30/2016 10:19 pm »
Block 0 SLS is in a race with Falcon Heavy and Vulcan Heavy. Definitely an "If" until Block 1A with its very heavy payload flies.

Interesting. Do you have any references or documentation on this Vulcan Heavy? I don't believe I've seen anything on that yet.

Also, regarding the SLS configuration terminology. There is no Block 0 and no Block 1A. Right now NASA is building SLS Block 1 vehicle with two 5-segment SRBs and the ICPS upper stage. This configuration should be able to put around 95 tonnes into LEO.

NASA hopes to replace the ICPS with the 8.4m EUS as soon as possible, making it an SLS Block 1B. Depending on many different factors, Block 1B may be ready in time for EM-2. This configuration should put up to 105 tonnes into LEO.

Someday far in the future, Block 2 would replace the 5-segment boosters with advanced composite-wound boosters, or possibly liquid boosters (but probably not). In Congressional theory, this configuration should be able to put at least 130 tonnes of payload into LEO. But probably not.

Based on this information, I would have to guess that a Block 1A would be an SLS core with ICPS upper stage and advanced boosters. I don't think that this configuration is currently under discussion at NASA.

Cheers!

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #676 on: 04/30/2016 11:15 pm »
Block 0 SLS is in a race with Falcon Heavy and Vulcan Heavy. Definitely an "If" until Block 1A with its very heavy payload flies.

Interesting. Do you have any references or documentation on this Vulcan Heavy? I don't believe I've seen anything on that yet.

Also, regarding the SLS configuration terminology. There is no Block 0 and no Block 1A. Right now NASA is building SLS Block 1 vehicle with two 5-segment SRBs and the ICPS upper stage. This configuration should be able to put around 95 tonnes into LEO.

NASA hopes to replace the ICPS with the 8.4m EUS as soon as possible, making it an SLS Block 1B. Depending on many different factors, Block 1B may be ready in time for EM-2. This configuration should put up to 105 tonnes into LEO.

Someday far in the future, Block 2 would replace the 5-segment boosters with advanced composite-wound boosters, or possibly liquid boosters (but probably not). In Congressional theory, this configuration should be able to put at least 130 tonnes of payload into LEO. But probably not.

Based on this information, I would have to guess that a Block 1A would be an SLS core with ICPS upper stage and advanced boosters. I don't think that this configuration is currently under discussion at NASA.

Cheers!

ULA has only only shown an Infographic that included VH to show that it is vastly more capable than FH, but it is not presently planned at this time
« Last Edit: 05/01/2016 06:01 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #677 on: 05/01/2016 07:56 am »
Right now NASA is building SLS Block 1 vehicle with two 5-segment SRBs and the ICPS upper stage. This configuration should be able to put around 95 tonnes into LEO.

Block 1 is 70 t to LEO.

Quote
NASA hopes to replace the ICPS with the 8.4m EUS as soon as possible, making it an SLS Block 1B. Depending on many different factors, Block 1B may be ready in time for EM-2. This configuration should put up to 105 tonnes into LEO.

Block IB with EUS is 93.1 t to LEO (value from Boeing AIAA Space 2013 paper).

Quote
Someday far in the future, Block 2 would replace the 5-segment boosters with advanced composite-wound boosters, or possibly liquid boosters (but probably not). In Congressional theory, this configuration should be able to put at least 130 tonnes of payload into LEO. But probably not.

That configuration won't be able to get 130 t to LEO without using a five engine core and/or a J-2X upper stage.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline TomH

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #678 on: 05/01/2016 09:17 pm »
Regarding the Block IIB, using Dark Knight advanced composite solids, which is what NASA says is its ultimate version of SLS, the performance numbers as calculated by Steven can be found here (113.4t):

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=39526.msg1499269#msg1499269

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #679 on: 05/09/2016 09:46 pm »
First Work Platforms Tested in Vehicle Assembly Building

NASAKennedy

Published on May 9, 2016
The first new work platforms for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) were powered on and tested in the Vehicle Assembly Building High Bay 3 at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During a preliminary test April 28, the two J-level platforms were extended to test their motors, tracks and roller systems for functionality. The J-level platforms are one of ten levels of platforms that will surround the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft during processing.

Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=qnOmIWbp19k

Tony De La Rosa

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