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91
Do we actually know it fell or is it just an assumption? They could've lowered it horizontal in preparation to strong winds...

It seems to me that we are jumping to conclusions here.
92
O say can you see by Boca Chicas bright sunlight
Our shiny tinfoil nosecone
Whose broad sides and spindly insides
Gave proof through the perilous wind that its up to the task of flight
O'er the internets we watched cameras so gallantly streaming
Now lets get on with the raptors blue glare not bursting in air

(the preceding has been a 2 minute effort - you can do better if you try)

Nevermind.
94
Isn't it past the freak outlier level, to have this and the plank of wood within such a short time?  Isn't this kind of below SpaceX standards?
95
I just checked the Facebook page, and the nosecone is currently horizontal.  The wind blew it over.  Hopefully it's not damaged.
96
Quote
It looks like it has fallen over in the wind! 🎥Maria-Pointer @John_Gardi @Avron_p

not good...  Surprised the bolt downs were strong enough.  Maybe skin tore around them?

A good auto body shop will straighten that out in no time.
98
https://twitter.com/RogerLewisHolt/status/1088073319809728512

Quote
It looks like it has fallen over in the wind! 🎥Maria-Pointer @John_Gardi @Avron_p

not good...  Surprised the bolt downs were strong enough.  Maybe skin tore around them?
99
According to Musk’s recent announcements it seems they will use gaseous methane to cool the skin of the Sharship, so they will be able to increase or decrease the cooling effect by increasing or decreasing the methane gas pressure.

They will want to monitor the skin temperature closely, especially on the windward side (sensors on the inside of the outer skin?). So presumably they would link the temperature sensors to whatever devices control the methane pressure so as to prevent overheating and minimise methane use?

I assume each “rib” of coolant pipe running from the centre line to the edge of the windward side would need its own sensor and regulator. No doubt all very doable, although it would involve a lot of wiring and regulators.

Does anyone know what sort of sensors they might use and how they might be arranged / connected so as not to get in the way of the gas flow yet still accurately measure the outer skin temperature?

They actually don't need to measure the temperature.  At (nearly) constant pressure across the pores in the skin and thermal equilibrium, the (mass) flow rate of the methane is proportional to the heat load in, since flow rate times specific heat of the methane equals heat load out. So they need to ensure that the methane in the wall interstice is at ambient pressure, which they can do just by measuring altitude and adjusting the pressure change entering the interstice, and then ensuring that the flow rate is constant at that pressure (the easiest control problem in the world!).  If this is the case then there is no change in temperature.
100
https://twitter.com/RogerLewisHolt/status/1088073319809728512

Quote
It looks like it has fallen over in the wind! 🎥Maria-Pointer @John_Gardi @Avron_p
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