NASASpaceFlight.com Forum

Robotic Spacecraft (Astronomy, Planetary, Earth, Solar/Heliophysics) => Space Science Coverage => Topic started by: FransonUK on 11/30/2005 04:58 PM

Title: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: FransonUK on 11/30/2005 04:58 PM
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Results_from_Mars_Express_and_Huygens/SEM7ZTULWFE_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Ad Astra on 11/30/2005 05:54 PM
It's starring us in the face. Let's get to Mars and see what it has to obviously offer.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: realtime on 12/01/2005 03:54 AM
"Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink..."

Unless you stick a well in it and have a sip.  It would be a hard life at first and it may never be easy, but an enterprising and intrepid group of people could make a living there.  This is confirmation.

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: FransonUK on 12/01/2005 12:44 PM
And there's more from Titan as well.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Avron on 12/02/2005 02:35 AM
Quote
FransonUK - 1/12/2005  8:44 AM

And there's more from Titan as well.

Thanks ESA and JPL, great work...
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Hotol on 04/10/2006 02:03 PM
They call it the happy face image, but I think it looks more like Pacman!

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMMTFNFGLE_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: MartianBase on 04/14/2006 06:59 AM
great !

I wonder what those conspiracy nuts think of this, will the add it to the cydonia face and martian pyramids
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Chris Bergin on 04/21/2006 09:19 AM
By mapping minerals on the surface of Mars using the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, scientists have discovered the three ages of Martian geological history - as reported in today's issue of Science - and found valuable clues as to where life might have developed.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM117OFGLE_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 04/21/2006 12:07 PM
Funny ages names... I love the "siderikian";)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Fab on 04/27/2006 02:30 AM
my question is -- if there was life in Mars, billions of years ago, and nobody lived, that means that there wasn't intelligent life there, or else they'd have manage to adapt - whcih makes me think that there wasn't life at all, because even roaches adapt to new living conditions...
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: PlanetStorm on 06/24/2006 02:20 PM
Quote
Fab - 26/4/2006  9:17 PM

my question is -- if there was life in Mars, billions of years ago, and nobody lived, that means that there wasn't intelligent life there, or else they'd have manage to adapt - whcih makes me think that there wasn't life at all, because even roaches adapt to new living conditions...

Ha! Intelligence has yet to be proven to be an advantage! If we are still here in 100 million years I might take your argument seriously! :)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: PlanetStorm on 06/24/2006 02:39 PM
Quote
eeergo - 21/4/2006  6:54 AM

Funny ages names... I love the "siderikian";)


Yes, but quite appropriate for the red planet because I think siderikian = age of iron. Also, Phyllocian (or phyllosian) = age of sheets or leaves (presumably mica of some other sheet-like mineral); and theiikian = age of sulphate.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/28/2006 12:51 PM
Planetary scientists have discovered the highest clouds above any planetary surface. They found them above Mars using the SPICAM instrument on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft. The results are a new piece in the puzzle of how the Martian atmosphere works.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMC4JZ7QQE_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: meiza on 08/28/2006 04:15 PM
CO2 crystal clouds at 80 to 100 km height? Mars Odyssey seems to have passed at 95 km at lowest when aerocapturing... What if it had met one of these?
( http://ccar.colorado.edu/asen5050/projects/projects_2004/dunn/ )
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: simonbp on 08/28/2006 04:49 PM
Here's a 30 km limb cloud seen by MGS; I belive the shot on ESA's site is from Pathfinder...

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2005/09/07/

Simon ;)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: JulesVerneATV on 08/28/2006 08:52 PM
Quote
simonbp - 28/8/2006  11:36 AM

Here's a 30 km limb cloud seen by MGS; I belive the shot on ESA's site is from Pathfinder...

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2005/09/07/

Simon ;)

You're correct

I quote : http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMC4JZ7QQE_1.html
'This true-colour view taken by NASA's Pathfinder rover in August 1997 shows clouds in the Martian eastern sky (30 degrees above the horizon), as imaged before sunrise.'
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/13/2007 10:34 AM
The origin of perennial water-ice at the South Pole of Mars

13 July 2007

Thanks to data from ESA's Mars Express mission, combined with models of the Martian climate, scientists can now suggest how the orbit of Mars around the Sun affects the deposition of water ice at the Martian South Pole.
 
Early during the mission, the OMEGA instrument (Visible and Infrared Mineralogical Mapping Spectrometer) on board Mars Express had already found previously undetected perennial deposits of water-ice. They are sitting on top of million-year old layered terrains and provide strong evidence for a recent glacial activity.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMKZRNSP3F_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 08/01/2007 01:26 PM
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express obtained images of the Tyrrhena Terra region on Mars.

Read more:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM72PB474F_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Michael Z Freeman on 09/04/2007 11:09 PM

Have you discovered the HSRC web interface  ? 3D projections as well.

DJ Barney

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2007 02:48 PM
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA’s Mars Express orbiter has obtained pictures of the Noachis Terra region on Mars, in particular, the striking Maunder crater.

Full story at:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMOHJAMS7F_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/01/2007 09:52 PM
NEWS RELEASE: 2007-126                                                                          Nov. 1, 2007


Mars Express Probes Red Planet's Unusual Deposits

The radar system on the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter has uncovered new details about some of the most mysterious deposits on Mars: the Medusae Fossae Formation.  It has provided the first direct measurement of the depth and electrical properties of these materials, providing new clues about their origin.

The Medusae Fossae Formation consists of enigmatic deposits. Found near the Martian equator along a divide between highlands and lowlands, they may represent some of the youngest deposits on the surface of the planet.  This is implied because there is a marked lack of impact craters dotting these deposits.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages NASA's roles in the Mars Express mission.  Mars Express has been collecting data on the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits using its Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (Marsis).  Between March 2006 and April 2007, Mars Express flew over the Medusae Fossae Formation deposits many times, taking radar soundings as it went.

"This is the first direct measurement of the depth of these deposits," said Thomas Watters of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., lead author of a new report on the findings in the journal Science. "We didn't know whether they were just a thin veneer or much thicker."  The radar observations found the Medusae Fossae Formation to be massive deposits more than 2.5 kilometers (1.4 miles) thick in places. The instrument reveals the depth based on the time it takes for the radar beam to pass through the layers and bounce off the plains material underneath.

The Medusae Fossae deposits intrigue scientists because they are associated with regions that absorb certain wavelengths of Earth-based radar.  This had led to them being called "stealth" regions, because they give no radar echo.  However, the radar instrument on Mars Express uses longer wavelengths than Earth-based radar experiments. At these wavelengths, the radar waves mostly pass through the deposits, creating subsurface echoes when the radar signal reflects off the plains material beneath.

A variety of scenarios has been proposed for the origin and composition of these deposits.  Firstly, they could be volcanic ash deposits from now-buried vents or nearby volcanoes.  Secondly, they could be deposits of wind-blown materials eroded from Martian rocks.  Thirdly, they could be ice-rich deposits, somewhat similar to the layered ice deposits at the poles of the planet, but formed when the spin axis of Mars tilts over, making the equatorial region colder.

Deciding among these scenarios is not easy, even with the new data. The Marsis data reveal the electrical properties of the layers.  These suggest that the layers could be poorly packed, fluffy, dusty material. However it is difficult to understand how porous material from wind-blown dust can be more than two kilometers (more than a mile) thick and yet not be compacted under the weight of the overlying material.

On the other hand, although the electrical properties are consistent with water-ice layers, there is no other strong evidence for the presence of ice today in the equatorial regions of Mars.  "If there is water ice at the equator of Mars, it must be buried at least several meters below the surface," said co-author Jeffrey Plaut of JPL.  This is because the water vapor pressure on Mars is so low that any ice near the surface would quickly evaporate.

So, the mystery of Mars's Medusae Fossae Formation continues.  "It is still early in the game.  We may get cleverer with our analysis and interpretation, or we may only know when we go there with a drill and see for ourselves," Plaut said.

Giovanni Picardi at the University of Rome "La Sapienza," Italy, principal investigator of the radar experiment, said "Not only is Marsis providing excellent scientific results, but the team is also working on the processing techniques that will allow for more accurate evaluation of the characteristics of the subsurface layers and their constituent material. Hence, the possible extension of the mission will be very important to increase the number of observations over the regions of interest and improve the accuracy of the evaluations."

The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding was funded by NASA and the Italian Space Agency and developed by the University of Rome in partnership with JPL. Italy provided the instrument's digital processing system and integrated the parts. The University of Iowa, Iowa City, built the transmitter for the instrument, JPL built the receiver, and Astro Aerospace, Carpinteria, Calif., built the antenna. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


For additional information about Mars Express, see http://sci.esa.int/marsexpress . For additional information about NASA's Mars exploration, see http://www.nasa.gov/mars .

 

-end-

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/02/2007 11:23 AM
The radar system on ESA's Mars Express has uncovered new details about some of the most mysterious deposits on Mars: The Medusae Fossae Formation. It has given the first direct measurement of the depth and electrical properties of these materials, providing new clues about their origin.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM0J2FWB8F_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: meiza on 11/02/2007 01:58 PM
Ah so what they mean to say is that it's a 2 km thick hill of different material sitting on the plains on Mars and it's true composition as well as formation is unknown, but it's different from the surroundings. Deposit is a much too general word to describe it.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/24/2007 08:58 AM
On 25 December 2003, Europe's first Mars explorer arrived at the Red Planet. Almost four years later, Mars Express continues to rewrite the text books as its instruments send back a stream of images and other data. Today, the spacecraft reached another milestone in its remarkable career by completing 5000 orbits of Mars.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM3OQ63R8F_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/05/2008 06:12 PM
ESA presents Mars in 3D

Mars is about to come into 3D focus as never before, thanks to the data from the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). A new high-resolution Digital Terrain Model data set that is about to be released onto the Internet, will allow researchers to obtain new information about the Red Planet in 3D.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM8Q2PR4CF_index_0.html

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/08/2008 08:30 PM
Is there life on Mars? ESA's Mars Express satellite, launched in 2003, has been scanning and mapping the surface of our rocky neighbour, and it has found that there are both substantial deposits of water ice below the Martian crust and traces of methane in the Martian atmosphere. The next step is ExoMars, due for launch in 2013, which will place a lander on the surface of the red planet with the express aim of searching for past or present signs of life. EuroNews talked to the scientists at the cutting edge of this research.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMAXUPR4CF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/15/2008 03:11 PM
Deep valleys of Candor Chasma
 
15 February 2008
Mars Express took snapshots of Candor Chasma, a valley in the northern part of Valles Marineris, as it was in orbit above the region on 6 July 2006.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM8Q7VHJCF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/05/2008 02:17 PM
Mars and Venus are surprisingly similar

5 March 2008  
Using two ESA spacecraft, planetary scientists are watching the atmospheres of Mars and Venus being stripped away into space. The simultaneous observations by Mars Express and Venus Express give scientists the data they need to investigate the evolution of the two planets' atmospheres.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMGQGK26DF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/14/2008 04:42 PM
Mars Express reveals the Red Planet's volcanic past

14 March 2008
A new analysis of impact cratering data from Mars reveals that the planet has undergone a series of global volcanic upheavals. These violent episodes spewed lava and water onto the surface, sculpting the landscape that ESA's Mars Express looks down on today.

http://asimov.esrin.esa.int/esaCP/SEMCPLM5NDF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 04/17/2008 04:25 PM
ESA’s Mars Express radar sounder, MARSIS, has looked beneath the martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique’s success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMIF74XQEF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 04/29/2008 03:11 PM
Artificial intelligence boosts science from Mars

29 April 2008

Artificial intelligence (AI) being used at the European Space Operations Centre is giving a powerful boost to ESA's Mars Express as it searches for signs of past or present life on the Red Planet.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM1RL2QGFF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 05/16/2008 03:09 PM
The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard the ESA spacecraft Mars Express obtained images of a region at the end of Mamers Valles, a long, winding valley. The focus is on a circular depression that contains a crater.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMKPM0YUFF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 05/20/2008 03:08 PM
Mars Express mission controllers ready for NASA Phoenix landing
 
20 May 2008
ESA's Mars Express mission control team are ready to monitor Phoenix's critical entry, descent and landing onto the Martian surface on 26 May 2008.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM8KD0YUFF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Lawntonlookirs on 05/20/2008 03:33 PM
Waiting for Sunday and hopefully some interesting pictures of the landing, or the approach.  15 minute 20 second delay for distance, but maybe some pictures.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 05/22/2008 03:06 PM
Timeline: Mars Express support to Phoenix landing

22 May 2008
Beginning late on 25 May, Mars Express will execute a series of pre-programmed commands specially designed to support NASA's Phoenix lander. The ESA spacecraft will conduct a high-speed slew, enabling it to track Phoenix as it enters the martian atmosphere.

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM3ZB1YUFF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/14/2008 03:39 PM
Echus Chasma
 
14 July 2008

The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express has returned images of Echus Chasma, one of the largest water source regions on the Red Planet.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM4CATHKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/16/2008 01:09 PM
Mars Express to rendezvous with Martian moon
 
16 July 2008
Scientists and engineers are preparing ESA's Mars Express for a pair of close fly-bys of the Martian moon Phobos. Passing within 100 km of the surface, Mars Express will conduct some of the most detailed investigations of the moon to date.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMVGAWIPIF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/30/2008 05:17 PM
Mars Express acquires sharpest images of martian moon Phobos

30 July 2008

Mars Express closed in on the intriguing martian moon Phobos at 6:49 CEST on 23 July, flying past at 3 km/s, only 93 km from the moon. The ESA spacecraft’s fly-bys of the moon have returned its most detailed full-disc images ever, also in 3-D, using the High Resolution Stereo Camera on board.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM5H48N9JF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Lawntonlookirs on 07/30/2008 05:59 PM
That is a quite an orbit that mars express is taking to get the pictures.  It's remarkable how they can work out the mathematics and flight strategy to accomplish this.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 08/22/2008 03:31 PM
'Mars Webcam' now online
22 August 2008

The Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) is mounted on Mars Express, ESA's deep-space probe now orbiting the Red Planet. It originally provided simple, low-tech images of Beagle lander separation, and is now back in action as the 'Mars Webcam'. It's not a scientific instrument, but it does provide fantastic views of Mars - including crescent views of the planet not obtainable from Earth.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/VMC/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 09/22/2008 05:07 PM
Mars polar cap mystery solved
 
22 September 2008

Scientists are now able to better explain why Mars's residual southern ice cap is misplaced, thanks to data from ESA's Mars Express spacecraft - the martian weather system is to blame. And so is the largest impact crater on Mars even though it is nowhere near the south pole.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMO78Q4KKF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 09/26/2008 09:34 AM
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA's Mars Express obtained images of the Mangala Fossae trough, a system of outflow channels on Mars that bears evidence of lava deposition and catastrophic floods.

Read more in our 'Focus on':
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMB4QQ4KKF_FeatureWeek_0.html

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2008 02:29 PM
European space scientists are getting closer to unravelling the origin of Mars' larger moon, Phobos. Thanks to a series of close encounters by ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, the moon looks almost certain to be a 'rubble pile', rather than a single solid object. However, mysteries remain about where the rubble came from.

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMB82TG7MF_index_0.html

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: iamlucky13 on 10/16/2008 06:29 PM
Phobos-Grunt just keeps on looking more and more compelling. Hopefully Russia carries forward with it.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/22/2008 02:26 AM
Scientists using ESA's Mars Express have produced the first crude map of aurorae on Mars. These displays of ultraviolet light appear to be located close to the residual magnetic fields generated by Mars's crustal rocks. They highlight a number of mysteries about the way Mars interacts with electrically charged particles originating from the Sun.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMY1B5DHNF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/28/2008 03:58 PM
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on board ESA's Mars Express imaged the Eumenides Dorsum mountains on the Red Planet.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMRS2AWYNF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2008 07:14 PM
Data and images from Mars Express suggest that several Light Toned Deposits, some of the least understood features on Mars, were formed when large amounts of groundwater burst on to the surface. Scientists propose that groundwater had a greater role in shaping the martian surface than previously believed, and may have sheltered primitive life forms as the planet started drying up.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMJDBSTGOF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/05/2009 02:52 AM
Mars Express January 2009 status report states an orbit maneuver in December 2008. Anyone have details (date/time it took place, length of firing, orbit change, etc.).

Thanks.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/10/2009 01:31 PM
ESA's Science Programme Committee has extended the operations of ESA's Mars Express, Venus Express and Cluster missions until 31 December 2009.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMACI05VQF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/19/2009 06:50 PM
Mars Express has uncovered geological evidence suggesting that some depositional process, revealed by erosion, has been at work on large scales in the equatorial regions of the planet. If so, this would provide another jigsaw piece to be fitted into the emerging picture of Mars' past climate.

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM8MQJTYRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 04/24/2009 03:09 PM
Images taken by the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera, show the region of Ariadnes Colles on the Red Planet.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM8JKANJTF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2009 03:19 PM
Craters and channels in Hephaestus Fossae

5 June 2009
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA's Mars Express orbiter has obtained images of Hephaestus Fossae, a region on Mars dotted with craters and channel systems.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMSKCVTGVF_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 10/09/2009 12:29 PM
Mars Express imaged Daedalia Planum, a sparsely cratered, untextured plain on the Red Planet featuring solidified lava flows of varying ages.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM5TDF280G_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/06/2009 03:02 PM
Mars Express flew over the boundary between Kasei Valles and Sacra Fossae and imaged the region, acquiring spectacular views of the chaotic terrain in the area.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMLEQCUE1G_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2009 12:09 PM
For the very first time, the martian moons Phobos and Deimos have been caught on camera together. ESA's Mars Express orbiter took these pioneering images last month. Apart from their 'wow' factor, these unique images will help the HRSC team validate and refine existing orbit models of the two moons.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMDOE7JT2G_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/03/2010 12:41 PM
Craters young and old in Sirenum Fossae

3 February 2010
The Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera has imaged craters both young and old in this view of the Southern Highlands of Mars.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMJLFSJR4G_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/16/2010 09:59 AM
Phobos flyby season starts again

16 February 2010
Today Mars Express began a series of flybys of Phobos, the largest moon of Mars. The campaign will reach its crescendo on 3 March, when the spacecraft will set a new record for the closest pass to Phobos, skimming the surface at just 50 km. The data collected could help untangle the origin of this mysterious moon.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM4Q1NEG5G_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 03/01/2010 07:03 PM
Some news about the Phobos flybys coming up this week:

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMFKA6K56G_index_0.html

Apparently, overperformance in an adjustment maneuver means the closest approach distance will be raised to 67 km, instead of the planned 50 km, because this closest distance would mean an occultation by Phobos which could degrade the Doppler shift measurements of the carrier signal. However, this doesn't mean we'll lose eye-catching images from a few kilometers closer, because no optical observations were planned at closest approach.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/02/2010 10:44 AM
ESA's Mars Express will skim the surface of Mars' largest moon Phobos on Wednesday evening, at an altitude of 67 km. Closest approach at:

Full coverage at: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/index.html

Phobos flyby blog: http://webservices.esa.int/blog/blog/7

On twitter at: http://www.twitter.com/esa
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 03/05/2010 08:04 PM

Phobos Flyby Success

4 March 2010

Mars Express encountered Phobos last night, smoothly skimming past at just 67 km, the closest any manmade object has ever approached Mars’ enigmatic moon. The data collected could help unlock the origin of not just Phobos but other ‘second generation’ moons.

Last night’s flyby was just one of a campaign of 12 Mars Express flybys taking place in February and March 2010. For the previous two, the radar was working, attempting to probe beneath the surface of the moon, looking for reflections from structures inside. In the coming flybys, the Mars Express camera will take over, providing high resolution pictures of the moon’s surface.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMIPX6K56G_index_0.html


Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/15/2010 10:46 AM
Phobos flyby images
 
15 March 2010
Images from the recent flyby of Phobos, on 7 March 2010, are released today. The images show Mars rocky moon in exquisite detail, with a resolution of just 4.4 metres per pixel. They show the proposed landing sites for the forthcoming Phobos-Grunt mission.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMK17CKP6G_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 05/12/2010 09:43 AM
Volcanic ash in Meridiani Planum

12 May 2010
Deposits of volcanic ash colour this view of the Meridiani Planum, as seen by the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera. They also give clues to the prevailing wind direction in this region of Mars.

http://www.esa.int/export/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMOSA19Y8G_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: neilh on 06/02/2010 09:44 PM
http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002517/
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMOR15XT9G_FeatureWeek_1.html
Quote
An Astronaut's-Eye View of Mars
Jun. 2, 2010 | 08:22 PDT | 15:22 UTC

In a spectacular video released to the Web on the seventh launch anniversary of Mars Express, the "Mars Webcam" has captured an astronaut's eye view of one complete orbit around the Red Planet. Volcanoes, canyons, polar caps, and one of Mars' moons march through the view as the spacecraft sweeps its elliptical path in space around Mars.
...
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 06/25/2010 02:12 PM
Wet era on early Mars was global

25 June 2010
Conditions favourable to life may once have existed all over Mars. Detailed studies of minerals found inside craters show that liquid water was widespread, not only in the southern highlands, but also beneath the northern plains.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMU70MZLAG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 06/28/2010 03:53 PM
Rocky mounds and a plateau on Mars

28 June 2010
When Mars Express set sail for the crater named after Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan, it found a windblown plateau and mysterious rocky mounds nearby.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMZ1FOZVAG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 08/27/2010 03:06 PM
Mars's mysterious elongated crater

27 August 2010
Orcus Patera is an enigmatic elliptical depression near Mars equator, in the eastern hemisphere of the planet. Located between the volcanoes of Elysium Mons and Olympus Mons, its formation remains a mystery.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMDV9BO3DG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/08/2010 08:25 PM
Melas Chasma on Mars: as low as one can go

8 October 2010

There are few places on Mars lower than this. The floor of Melas Chasma sinks nine kilometres below the surrounding plains. New images from the German Aerospace Centre (Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) operated High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA's Mars Express orbiter highlight the complex history of this enormous martian canyon.

http://www.dlr.de/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-1/117_read-26969/

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM8PWSOREG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/12/2010 03:58 PM
Light and dark in the Phoenix Lake


12 November 2010
They say you can't judge a book by its cover but, with planets, first impressions do count. New images show where complex fault lines in Mars Phoenicis Lacus region have resulted in terrain with a distinctly contrasting appearance.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMYQ1DR5GG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 12/10/2010 06:22 PM
Wind and water have shaped Schiaparelli on Mars

10 December 2010
The small crater embedded in the northwestern rim of the Schiaparelli impact basin features prominently in this new image from ESA’s Mars Express. All around is evidence for past water and the great martian winds that periodically blow.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMEEYOR9HG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 01/21/2011 12:33 PM
Mars Express close flybys of martian moon Phobos

21 January 2011

Mars Express has returned images from the Phobos flyby of 9 January 2011. Mars Express passed Mars’ largest moon at a distance of 100km.
 
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMIPY6SXIG_index_0.html

and

http://www.dlr.de/en/DesktopDefault.aspx/tabid-1/117_read-28690/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/04/2011 02:30 PM
Mars Express puts craters on a pedestal

4 February 2011
ESA's Mars Express has returned new views of pedestal craters in the Red Planet's eastern Arabia Terra.


http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMM9RY1LJG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 03/04/2011 11:04 AM
The scars of impacts on Mars

4 March 2011
ESA's Mars Express has returned new images of an elongated impact crater in the southern hemisphere of Mars. Located just south of the Huygens basin, it could have been carved out by a train of projectiles striking the planet at a shallow angle.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMTK5VTLKG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 04/01/2011 11:59 AM
Neighbouring volcanoes on Mars

1 April 2011

ESA’s Mars Express has returned images of mist-capped volcanoes located in the northern hemisphere of the red planet. Long after volcanic activity ceased, the area was transformed by meteor impacts that deposited ejected material over the lower flanks of the volcanoes.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM6057UPLG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 05/06/2011 05:32 PM
Mars Express sees deep fractures on Mars
 
6 May 2011

Newly released images from ESA’s Mars Express show Nili Fossae, a system of deep fractures around the giant Isidis impact basin. Some of these incisions into the martian crust are up to 500 m deep and probably formed at the same time as the basin.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMT4TZ57NG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 06/07/2011 04:58 PM
Springtime at Mars’ south pole
 
7 June 2011

ESA’s Mars Express celebrates eight years in space with a new view of ice in the southern polar region of Mars. The poles are closely linked to the planet’s climate and constantly change with the seasons. Their study is an important scientific objective of the mission.


http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMZBQJ4LOG_index_1.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/17/2011 04:26 PM
Phobos slips past Jupiter

17 June 2011

Earlier this month, ESA’s Mars Express performed a special manoeuvre to observe an unusual alignment of Jupiter and the martian moon Phobos. The impressive images have now been processed into a movie of this rare event.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMJ53E1XOG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 08/05/2011 10:01 AM
Mars’ northern polar regions in transition

5 August 2011

A newly released image from ESA’s Mars Express shows the north pole of Mars during the red planet’s summer solstice. All the carbon dioxide ice has gone, leaving just a bright cap of water ice.
 
This image was captured by the orbiter’s High-Resolution Stereo Camera on 17 May 2010 and shows part of the northern polar region of Mars during the summer solstice. The solstice is the longest day and the beginning of the summer for the planet’s northern hemisphere.

The ice shield is covered by frozen water and carbon dioxide ice in winter and spring but by this point in the martian year all of the carbon dioxide ice has warmed and evaporated into the planet’s atmosphere.

Only water ice is left behind, which shows up as bright white areas in this picture. From these layers, large bursts of water vapour are occasionally released into the atmosphere.

The polar ice follows the seasons. In winter, part of the atmosphere recondenses as frost and snow on the northern cap. These seasonal deposits can extend as far south as 45°N latitude and be up to a metre thick.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMA4VITPQG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 09/02/2011 09:31 AM
Rare martian lake delta spotted by Mars Express

2 September 2011

ESA’s Mars Express has spotted a rare case of a crater once filled by a lake, revealed by the presence of a delta. The delta is an ancient fan-shaped deposit of dark sediments, laid down in water. It is a reminder of Mars’ past, wetter climate.

The delta is in the Eberswalde crater, in the southern highlands of Mars. The 65 km-diameter crater is visible as a semi-circle on the right of the image and was formed more than 3.7 billion years ago when an asteroid hit the planet.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMM71VTTRG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/07/2011 12:22 PM
Mars Express observes clusters of recent craters in Ares Vallis

7 October 2011

Newly released images taken by ESA’s Mars Express show an unusual accumulation of young craters in the large outflow channel called Ares Vallis. Older craters have been reduced to ghostly outlines by the scouring effects of ancient water.
 
In the distant past, probably over 3.8 billion years ago, large volumes of water must have rushed through the Ares Vallis with considerable force. Mars Express imaged the preserved aftermath of this scene on 11 May 2011.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMGJB9U7TG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/07/2011 12:44 PM
European orbiter discovers water supersaturation in the Martian atmosphere

6 Oct 2011

New analysis of data sent back by the SPICAM spectrometer on board the Mars Express spacecraft has revealed for the first time that the planet's atmosphere is supersaturated with water vapour. This surprising discovery has major implications for understanding the Martian water cycle and the historical evolution of the atmosphere.

http://www.bis.gov.uk/ukspaceagency/news-and-events/2011/Oct/european-orbiter-discovers-water-supersaturation-in-the-martian-atmosphere
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Moe Grills on 11/02/2011 01:58 AM
  Some disturbing reports about Mars Express.
It seems that it has been shut down due to software problems.

 I ask you for details, please.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: rdale on 11/02/2011 02:05 AM
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49549
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 11/08/2011 01:21 PM
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49549

Mars Express observations temporarily suspended

31 Oct 2011

Anomalies in the operation of the solid-state mass memory system on board Mars Express have caused science observations to be temporarily halted. A technical work-around is being investigated that will enable the resumption of a number of observations and should evolve into a long-term solution.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 11/08/2011 08:06 PM
Battered Tharsis Tholus volcano on Mars
 
8 November 2011

The latest image released from Mars Express reveals a large extinct volcano that has been battered and deformed over the aeons.
 
By Earthly standards, Tharsis Tholus is a giant, towering 8 km above the surrounding terrain, with a base stretching over 155 x 125 km. Yet on Mars, it is just an average-sized volcano. What marks it out as unusual is its battered condition.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMIU8TWLUG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 11/25/2011 08:50 AM
Mars Express steadily returns to routine operation
 
24 November 2011

Mission controllers are making excellent progress in returning Mars Express to routine service. Some science activities have already resumed after being temporarily suspended last month following a series of faults related to the onboard data storage system.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/SEMYN9ZW5VG_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 12/02/2011 10:33 AM
Mountains and buried ice on Mars
 
2 December 2011

New images from Mars Express show the Phlegra Montes mountain range, in a region where radar probing indicates large volumes of water ice are hiding below. This could be a source of water for future astronauts.
 
Phlegra Montes is a range of gently curving mountains and ridges on Mars. It extends from the northeastern portion of the Elysium volcanic province to the northern lowlands, spanning latitudes from roughly 30°N to 50°N.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMUGI2XFVG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 12/14/2011 03:34 PM
MARSIS completes measurement campaign over Martian North Pole

14 Dec 2011

The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on board Mars Express has recently completed a subsurface sounding campaign over the planet's North Pole. The campaign was interrupted by the suspension of science observations several times between August and October due to safe modes and to anomalies in the operation of the spacecraft's Solid-State Mass Memory (SSMM) system. As MARSIS best observes in the dark, which for the North Pole only occurs every few years, it was among the first instruments to resume observations once a partial work-around for the problems had been implemented.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49771
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 01/13/2012 12:48 PM
Mars Express picture gallery

http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10571/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 01/13/2012 01:00 PM
Mars Express: 'Wrinkle ridges' and grabens in Tempe Terra

06 January 2012

Tempe Terra is located at the northeastern edge of the Tharsis volcanic region and forms the transition zone between the southern highlands and the northern lowlands. This area is characterised by a large variety of tectonic structures and is one of the most geologically diverse on Mars.

http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10231/336_read-2417/year-2012/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 02/03/2012 03:49 PM
Mars Express reveals wind-blown deposits on Mars

3 February 2012
New images from ESA’s Mars Express show the Syrtis Major region on Mars. Once thought to be a sea of water, the region is now known to be a volcanic province dating back billions of years.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM1NHTXXXG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 02/06/2012 03:18 PM
ESA's Mars Express radar gives strong evidence for former Mars ocean
 
6 February 2012

ESA's Mars Express has returned strong evidence for an ocean once covering part of Mars. Using radar, it has detected sediments reminiscent of an ocean floor within the boundaries of previously identified, ancient shorelines on Mars.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMVINVX7YG_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 02/15/2012 12:52 PM
Return to full science operations

15 Feb 2012

Following a permanent anomaly affecting the onboard solid-state mass memory system on Mars Express, efforts to implement a work-around are almost complete. Full science operations have been resumed and the potential mission lifetime remains unaltered.

Since the suspension of Mars Express science operations, the mission control team has been hard at work devising, testing and implementing a new method of commanding the spacecraft in order to mitigate the effects of a failure in the onboard data storage system.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50026
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 03/26/2012 01:34 PM
A glow in the Martian night throws light on atmospheric circulation

23 Mar 2012

A faint, infrared glow above the winter poles of Mars is giving new insights into seasonal changes in the planet's atmospheric circulation. The tell-tale night emission was first detected in 2004 in observations made by the OMEGA imaging spectrometer on ESA's Mars Express orbiter.

 http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50198
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 04/05/2012 07:56 PM
The pit-chains of Mars – a possible place for life?

5 April 2012

The latest images released from ESA’s Mars Express reveal a series of ‘pit-chains’ on the flanks of one of the largest volcanoes in the Solar System. Depending on their origin, they might be tempting targets in the search for microbial life on the Red Planet.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 04/26/2012 05:04 PM
First Mars Express gravity results plot volcanic history

26 April 2012

Five years of Mars Express gravity mapping data are providing unique insights into what lies beneath the Red Planet’s largest volcanoes. The results show that the lava grew denser over time and that the thickness of the planet's rigid outer layers varies across the Tharsis region.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM6HJNW91H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 05/04/2012 03:50 PM
Signs of ancient flowing water on Mars

4 May 2012

ESA’s Mars Express has returned images of a region on the Red Planet that appears to have been sculpted in part by flowing liquid. This again adds to the growing evidence that Mars had large volumes of water on its surface in the distant past.
 
On 21 June last year, Mars Express pointed its high-resolution stereo camera at the western part of Acidalia Planitia, a gigantic basin in the planet’s northern lowlands, at the interface with Tempe Terra, an older, higher terrain.
 
Acidalia Planitia is a region so vast that it can be seen from Earth by amateur astronomers.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM2RJQWJ1H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 05/21/2012 02:00 PM
http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2012/05/21/return-of-the-mars-webcam/

Quote
The smallest instrument on Mars Express - VMC (Visual Monitoring Camera), the Mars Webcam - has finally returned to service following the major anomaly that struck Mars Express at the end of summer 2011.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/07/2012 11:18 AM
Mars crater shows evidence for climate evolution

7 June 2012

ESA’s Mars Express has provided images of a remarkable crater on Mars that may show evidence that the planet underwent significant periodic fluctuations in its climate due to changes in its rotation axis.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMD285XX2H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/27/2012 02:36 PM
Craters expose action of groundwater beneath Martian highlands

27 Jun 2012

A new study of the ancient, cratered highlands of Mars has detected numerous exposures of minerals that were altered by underground water during the planet's early history. The data indicate that subsurface water persisted for prolonged periods of time during the first billion years of the planet's existence.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50508

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMKT91VW3H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/05/2012 01:06 PM
Melas Dorsa reveals a complex geological history on Mars
 
5 July 2012

ESA’s Mars Express has imaged an area to the south of the famed Valles Marineris canyon on the Red Planet, showing a wide range of tectonic and impact features.
 
On 17 April, the orbiter pointed its high-resolution stereo camera at the Melas Dorsa region of Mars. This area sits in the volcanic highlands of Mars between Sinai and Thaumasia Plana, 250 km south of Melas Chasma. Melas Chasma itself is part of the Valles Marineris rift system.

The image captures wrinkle ridges, some unusual intersecting faults and an elliptical crater surrounded by ejecta in the shape of a butterfly and with a strange ‘fluid-like’ appearance. 

Elliptical craters like this 16 km-wide example are formed when asteroids or comets strike the surface of the planet at a shallow angle.

Scientists have suggested that a fluidised ejecta pattern indicates the presence of subsurface ice which melted during the impact. Subsequent impacts have created a number of smaller craters in the ejecta blanket.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM26D2VW3H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/25/2012 03:57 PM
Planetary missions probe giant eruptions in the Sun's corona

24 Jul 2012

Scientists have probed the corona of the Sun by studying the disturbances that it causes to radio transmission from three of ESA's planetary missions: Mars Express, Venus Express and Rosetta. The measurements were performed on several occasions, when each of the spacecraft was located behind the Sun as viewed from Earth. In particular, five coronal mass ejections were detected with Mars Express in 2004. Analysis of these data has revealed the morphology of these colossal solar eruptions in great detail, complementing the view that can be achieved via direct imaging of the Sun's corona.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50627
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/26/2012 12:59 PM
ESA's Mars Express supports dramatic landing on Mars
 
25 July 2012

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMJBLPXV4H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 08/02/2012 03:23 PM
The fractured features of Ladon basin

2 August 2012

ESA’s Mars Express has observed the southern part of a partially buried approx. 440-km wide crater, informally named Ladon basin. The images, near to where Ladon Valles enters this large impact region reveal a variety of features, most notably the double interconnected impact craters Sigli and Shambe, the basins of which are criss-crossed by extensive fracturing.
 
This region, imaged on 27 April by the high-resolution stereo camera on Mars Express is of great interest to scientists since it shows significant signs of ancient lakes and rivers.

 http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM5O1TX55H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 08/04/2012 07:39 PM
Mars Express marks the spot for Curiosity landing

3 August 2012


http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMEV8TX55H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 09/06/2012 09:26 AM
Hadley Crater provides deep insight into martian geology

6 September 2012

Recently engaged in providing support to the successful landing of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory “Curiosity”, ESA’s Mars Express has now returned to its primary mission of studying the diverse geology and atmosphere of the Red Planet from orbit.
 
Earlier this year, the spacecraft observed the 120 km wide Hadley Crater, providing a tantalising insight into the martian crust. The images show multiple subsequent impacts within the main crater wall, reaching depths of up to 2600 m below the surrounding surface.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM8BQ7YJ6H_index_0.html 
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/04/2012 01:55 PM
Ice-coated beauty in Mars’ Silver Island

4 October 2012

On 8 June, the high-resolution stereo camera on Mars Express captured a region within the 1800 km-wide and 5 km-deep Argyre basin, which was created by a gigantic impact in the planet’s early history.
 
After Hellas, the Argyre impact basin is the second largest on the Red Planet. 

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM8GXERI7H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/23/2012 12:03 PM
The Solar System’s grandest canyon

22 October 2012

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMAEO4S18H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/03/2012 08:15 AM
Nereidum Montes helps unlock Mars’ glacial past


High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) nadir and colour channel data taken during revolution 10736 on 6 June 2012 by ESA’s Mars Express have been combined to form a natural-colour view of Nereidum Montes. Centred at around 40°S and 310°E, the image has a ground resolution of about 23 m per pixel. It shows a portion of the extensive region, with concentric crater fill in many of the craters towards the east (lower part of the image). Undulations in crater floors are commonly seen in mid-latitude regions on Mars and are believed to be a result of glacial movement.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/03/2012 08:16 AM
Nereidum Montes perspective view


This computer-generated perspective view was created using data obtained from the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA’s Mars Express. Centred at around 40°S and 310°E, the image has a ground resolution of about 23 m per pixel. This perspective view highlights many of the rippled sand dunes which form on the leeward (wind-sheltered) sides of mounds and canyons, as well as the lobate and fan-shaped surface around the impact crater which dominates the lower portion of the image. These features may indicate the previous extent of glaciation in the region, before a drier period in the planet’s history created the smooth plains. Taken during revolution 10736 on 6 June 2012.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 11/27/2012 10:09 AM
Fostering Curiosity: Mars Express relays rocky images

Rocknest3 relayed by Mars Express
 
26 November 2012
For the first time, ESA’s Mars orbiter has relayed scientific data from NASA’s Curiosity rover on the Red Planet’s surface. The data included detailed images of ‘Rocknest3’ and were received by ESA’s deep-space antenna in Australia.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMZ7ZB1W9H_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 12/06/2012 06:06 PM
Charitum Montes: a cratered winter wonderland
 
6 December 2012
The high-resolution stereo camera on ESA’s Mars Express imaged the Charitum Montes region of the Red Planet on 18 June, near to Gale crater and the Argyre basin featured in our October and November image releases.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMH7W2ABAH_index_0.html
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 04/11/2013 04:48 PM
Explosive crater twins on Mars
 
11 April 2013

Dramatic underground explosions, perhaps involving ice, are responsible for the pits inside these two large martian impact craters, imaged by ESA’s Mars Express on 4 January.
 
The ‘twin’ craters are in the Thaumasia Planum region, a large plateau that lies immediately to the south of Valles Marineris, the largest canyon in the Solar System.
 
The northernmost (right) large crater in this scene was officially given the name Arima in early 2012, but the southernmost (left) crater remains unnamed. Both are just over 50 km wide and display intricate interior features.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Explosive_crater_twins_on_Mars

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 04/25/2013 01:56 PM
http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_activities_in_2013_of_interest_to_media_-_Update_25_April_2013

Quote
Skimming the surface of Phobos
 Mars Express will perform the closest ever fly-by of martian moon Phobos, passing only 58 km from the moon's centre (or within around 47 km of the moon's surface). Flying so close to the surface will in itself be a navigation feat, and will provide an unprecedented determination of the moon's mass distribution.
Expected date: Flyby will take place on 29 December, with results available in early 2014
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/03/2013 02:16 PM
Ten years at Mars: new global views plot the Red Planet’s history

03 Jun 2013

New global maps of Mars released on the 10th anniversary of the launch of ESA's Mars Express trace the history of water and volcanic activity on the Red Planet, and identify sites of special interest for the next generation of Mars explorers.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=51856

DLR Web special: The High Resolution Stereo Camera has been on board Mars Express for 10 years

http://www.mex10.dlr.de/index-en.html

Mars Express mission highlights

http://spaceinimages.esa.int/Images/2013/05/Mars_Express_mission_highlights

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: catdlr on 06/04/2013 04:04 AM
and a 10 year highlight video:

Mars Express ten year highlights

Published on Jun 3, 2013
ESA
The journey of Mars Express, from drawing board through launch, to its key science highlights during ten years of operations. With its suite of seven instruments, Mars Express has studied the subsurface of the Red Planet to the upper atmosphere and beyond to the two tiny moons Phobos and Deimos, providing an in depth analysis of the planet's history and returning stunning 3D images

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyWC_zPTLsI
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: catdlr on 06/04/2013 06:17 PM
Mars Express Full Orbit Video 2.0

Published on Jun 4, 2013
In celebration of the 10th anniversary of Mars Express: a new and enhanced Full Orbit Video genarted by multiple images acquired by the VMC camera - the Mars Webcam - on board ESA's Mars Express

This version is a special 'MEX birthday preview'. We'll post a somewhat extended version late next week, to coincide with the next expected VMC image set arriving from Mars (for news, follow the VMC blog http://blogs.esa.int/vmc)

Thanks to the Mars Express Science & operations teams for generating a fabulous, unique-in-our-Solar-System view of the Red planet. And happy Birthday, Mars Express!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Os5aQ25ECg
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/07/2013 08:28 PM
The floodwaters of Mars

6 June 2013

Dramatic flood events carved this impressive channel system on Mars covering 1.55 million square kilometres, shown here in a stunning new mosaic from ESA’s Mars Express.

The mosaic, which features the spectacular Kasei Valles, comprises 67 images taken with the spacecraft’s high-resolution stereo camera and is released during the week of the 10th anniversary of the spacecraft’s launch to the Red Planet.

Kasei Valles is one of the largest outflow channel systems on Mars – from source to sink, it extends some 3000 km and descends by 3 km in altitude. The scene covered in the mosaic spans 987 km north–south (19–36°N) and 1550 km east–west (280–310°E).

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/The_floodwaters_of_Mars

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/20/2013 04:09 PM
ESA science missions continue in overtime

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=51944

Quote
On 19 June, the SPC approved new extensions – until 31 December 2016 - for Cassini-Huygens, Cluster, Hinode, Hubble Space Telescope, INTEGRAL, Mars Express, SOHO and XMM-Newton. Consistent with previous cycles, these are subject to mid-term confirmation, in late 2014.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/04/2013 09:19 AM
At the foot of the Red Planet’s giant volcano

4 July 2013

Hundreds of individual lava flows are seen frozen in time on the flanks of Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the Solar System.

The images, taken on 21 January 2013 by ESA’s Mars Express, focus on the southeast segment of the giant volcano, which towers some 22 km above the surrounding plains. This is more than double the height of Mauna Kea, the tallest volcano on Earth at 10 km, when measured from its oceanic base to summit.


http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/At_the_foot_of_the_Red_Planet_s_giant_volcano
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Star One on 08/01/2013 05:46 PM
1 August 2013
Craters once brim-full with sediments and water have long since drained dry, but traces of their former lives as muddy lakes cling on in the martian desert.

The images were taken on 15 January by ESA’s Mars Express, and feature a region just a few degrees south of the equator within the ancient southern highlands of Mars. The unnamed region lies immediately to the north of an ancient riverbed known as Tagus Valles and east of Tinto Valles and Palos crater that were presented in an earlier release.

The 34 km-wide crater in the top left of the main images perhaps draws most attention with its chaotic interior. Here, broad flat-topped blocks called mesas can be found alongside smaller parallel wind-blown features known as yardangs.

Both mesas and yardangs were carved from sediments that originally filled the crater, deposited there during a flood event that covered the entire scene. Over time, the weakest sediments were eroded away, leaving the haphazard pattern of stronger blocks behind.

Further evidence of this crater’s watery past can be seen in the top right of the crater in the shape of a small, winding river channel.

Clues also hang onto the ghostly outline of an ancient crater some 20 km to the east (below in the main images). While the crater has all but been erased from the geological record, a long meandering channel clearly remains, and flows towards the crater in the centre of the scene.

This central complex of craters is seen close up in the perspective view below, showing in more detail another channel-like feature, along with a highly deformed crater. Perhaps the rim of this eroded crater was breached as sediments flooded the larger crater.

The crater is also seen from a different angle and in the background of the second perspective view below. In the foreground is one of the deepest craters in the scene, as indicated by the topography map.

Numerous landslides have occurred within this crater, perhaps facilitated by the presence of water weakening the crater walls. Grooves etched into the crater’s inner walls mark the paths of tumbling rocks, while larger piles of material have slumped en-masse to litter the crater floor.

A group of interconnected craters with flat floors smoothed over by sediments lie in the lower right part of the main image. One small crater with a prominent debris deposit – an ejecta blanket – lies within the crater.

Ejecta blankets are composed of material excavated from inside the crater during its formation. This particular crater exhibits a ‘rampart’ ejecta blanket – one with petal-like lobes around its edges. Liquid water bound up in the ejected material allowed it to flow along the surface, giving it a fluid appearance.

But it’s not just water that has played a role in this region; volcanic eruptions have also had their say. A dark layer of fine-grained ash covers the top left corner of the main image that may have been deposited from the Elysium volcanic province to the northeast. Over time, the ash was redistributed by wind, and buried deposits exposed in localised areas by erosion.

This region is one of many that exposes evidence of the Red Planet’s active past, and shows that the marks of water are engraved in even the most unlikely ancient crater-strewn fields.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Water_in_a_martian_desert
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 09/05/2013 06:50 PM
A radiating beauty on Mars

5 September 2013

Exceptional structures deposited and shaped by water and winds adorn these interlocking craters and sculpt radiating patterns in the sands of Mars.

This mosaic, which focuses on Becquerel crater in Arabia Terra, is composed of four images taken by the high-resolution stereo camera on ESA’s Mars Express. Arabia Terra is in the transition zone between the southern highlands and the northern lowlands of Mars.

Becquerel crater is named for the 19th-century French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel (1852–1908), winner of the Nobel Prize in physics in 1903 along with Marie and Pierre Curie for the discovery of radioactivity.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/A_radiating_beauty_on_Mars

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 10/05/2013 10:43 AM
A seasonal ozone layer over the Martian south pole

29 September 2013

For the past decade, ESA's Mars Express orbiter has been observing atmospheric structure on the Red Planet. Among its discoveries is the presence of three separate ozone layers, each with its own characteristics. A new comparison of spacecraft data with computer models explains how global atmospheric circulation creates a layer of ozone above the planet's southern winter pole.

http://sci.esa.int/mars-express/52881-a-seasonal-ozone-layer-over-the-martian-south-pole/

Image credit: ESA/ATG medialab
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 10/11/2013 12:22 PM
This mosaic of Hebes Chasma is composed of eight single images taken with the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express, corresponding to orbits 360 (2 May 2004), 2149 (16 September 2005), 3217 (12 July 2006), 5142 (3 January 2008), 5160 (8 January 2008), 5178 (13 January 2008), 6241 (11 November 2008), and 7237 (24 August 2009). The image centre lies at about 1°S / 284°E.

Hebes Chasma is an enclosed, almost 8 km-deep trough stretching 315 km in an east–west direction and 125 km from north to south at its widest point. It sits about 300 km north of the vast Valles Marineris canyon. A flat-topped mesa is located in the centre of Hebes Chasma, which was likely shaped by the action of wind and water.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)

Read more:
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Martian_scars
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 12/25/2013 08:28 PM
Mars Express heading towards daring flyby of Phobos

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2013/12/23/mars-express-heading-towards-daring-flyby-of-phobos/

Quote
   
Late this month, ESA’s Mars Express will make the closest flyby yet of the Red Planet’s largest moon Phobos, skimming past at only 45 km above its surface.

The flyby on 29 December will be so close and fast that Mars Express will not be able to take any images, but instead it will yield the most accurate details yet of the moon’s gravitational field and, in turn, provide new details of its internal structure.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 01/08/2014 08:22 AM
Phobos: Like a Phoenix from the ashes

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2013/12/31/phobos-like-a-phoenix-from-the-ashes/

Alien audio: Listen to Mars Express skim by Phobos

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2013/12/31/alien-audio-listen-to-mars-express-skim-by-phobos/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 02/21/2014 07:25 PM
Very interesting set of posts (ongoing) about how Mars Express' team plans to protect the spacecraft from this October's flyby of Comet C/2013 A1 "Siding Spring" :

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/02/07/mars-express-team-readies-for-siding-springs/
http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/02/14/why-orienting-our-spacecraft-is-the-heart-of-the-challenge/
http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/02/21/space-is-really-really-big-except-sometimes-it-isnt/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 03/06/2014 08:09 PM
Lava floods the ancient plains of Mars

6 March 2014

Two distinct volcanic eruptions have flooded this area of Daedalia Planum with lava, flowing around an elevated fragment of ancient terrain.

The images were acquired by ESA’s Mars Express on 28 November 2013 towards the eastern boundary of the gigantic Tharsis Montes volcanic region, where the largest volcanoes on Mars are found.

The lava flows seen in this image come from Arsia Mons, the southernmost volcano in the Tharsis complex, which lies around 1000 km to the northwest of the region featured here.

This volcanic region is thought to have been active until tens of millions of years ago, relatively recent on the planet’s geological timescale that spans 4.6 billion years.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Lava_floods_the_ancient_plains_of_Mars

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/28/2014 02:09 PM
http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2014/07/27/earth-seen-from-mars-we-are-here/

Earth seen from Mars: We are here

Image credit: ESA/Mars Express/VMC
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 12/22/2014 10:24 AM
Access the full VMC image archive

http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2014/12/17/access-the-full-vmc-image-archive/

ESA Mars Express HRSC images now available under a Creative Commons licence

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/12/18/esa-mars-express-hrsc-images-now-available-under-a-creative-commons-licence/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 08/19/2015 08:49 AM
Flight over Atlantis Chaos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_b39AHRMlw
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 09/10/2015 02:52 PM
Mars south pole and beyond

This sweeping view by ESA’s Mars Express extends from the planet’s south polar ice cap and across its cratered highlands to the Hellas Basin (top left) and beyond.

The image was acquired by the high-resolution stereo camera on ESA’s Mars Express on 25 February 2015. It is a ‘broom calibration’ image, acquired while the spacecraft performed a manoeuvre such that its camera pans over the surface far above the planet, at about 9 900 km.

The ground resolution is about 1 km per pixel at the closest point to the surface. The image was created using data from the nadir channel, the field of view of which is aligned perpendicular to the surface of Mars, and the colour channels of HRSC. These channels have been co-registered using ‘markers’ on the surface, such as a mountain or dark spot, to achieve a common geometry. That is, for each colour channel, these markers are overlain to produce the colour image. This process is not needed for ‘normal’ nadir observations because the geometry is known here, unlike in this broom observation.

Related article:

- Sweeping over the south pole of Mars

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Sweeping_over_the_south_pole_of_Mars

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/09/Mars_south_pole_and_beyond
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Nomadd on 09/10/2015 04:11 PM
http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2014/07/27/earth-seen-from-mars-we-are-here/

Earth seen from Mars: We are here

Image credit: ESA/Mars Express/VMC

I can see my house.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 11/13/2015 01:44 PM
Mars’ night-time aurora

Using 10 years of data from Mars Express, scientists have for the first time combined remote sensing observations of localised ultraviolet aurora with in situ measurements of electrons hitting the atmosphere, finding these rare light emissions only occur under special magnetic field conditions.

Centre: Locations of the 19 auroral detections (white circles) by SPICAM on the Mars nightside in the southern hemisphere, over locations already known to be associated with residual crustal magnetism. The data is superimposed on the magnetic field line structure (from NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor) where red indicates closed magnetic field lines, grading through yellow, green and blue to open field lines in purple. The auroral emissions are very short-lived, they are not seen to repeat in the same locations, and only occur near the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines (also visualised top right).

Bottom right: SPICAM limb observations enabled the altitude of some of the auroral events to be determined as 137+/- 27 km.

Full story: Shining a light on the aurora of Mars (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Shining_a_light_on_the_aurora_of_Mars)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/11/Mars_night-time_aurora

Image credit: Spacecraft: ESA/ATG medialab; data: J-C. Gérard & L. Soret (2015)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 01/28/2016 01:59 PM
The close-approach Phobos imaging sequence wasn't saved due to a recurrent error with the mass memory that happened during the latest Phobos flyby. Other science data (radar, particle and plasma) was saved and transmitted back.

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2016/01/28/update-on-phobos-flyby-science-results/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 03/29/2016 10:35 AM
Hellas Basin rim

A portion of the vast Hellas Basin, incorporating the transition of the fractured, terraced rim (top) into the smoother frost-covered basin floor (bottom).

The region was imaged by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA’s Mars Express on 6 December 2015 during orbit 15127. The image is centred on 45ºS/48ºE and the ground resolution is about 52 m per pixel.

Related article: Frosty martian valleys (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Frosty_martian_valleys)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/03/Hellas_Basin_rim

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 05/28/2016 11:02 AM
Access the full VMC image archive

http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2014/12/17/access-the-full-vmc-image-archive/

ESA Mars Express HRSC images now available under a Creative Commons licence

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/12/18/esa-mars-express-hrsc-images-now-available-under-a-creative-commons-licence/

Mars Webcam goes pro

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Mars_Webcam_goes_pro

VMC The Mars Webcam (Flickr)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/esa_marswebcam/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/01/2016 01:53 PM
http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2016/06/15/mars-express-chats-with-curiosity-practice-makes-perfect/

Quote
.... Mars Express established a communication link with NASA's Curiosity rover (MSL) on the surface of Mars to conduct an important test prior to the arrival of ESA's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), carrying the the ExoMars Entry, Descent and Landing Demonstrator Module (EDM), Schiaparelli, in October.

The test saw Curiosity serve as a stand-in (rove-in?) for Schiaparelli on the surface, transmitting a signal to MEX similar to how Schiaparelli will transmit during landing on 19 October. From orbit above, MEX had its lander communication system (Melacom) – with recently updated software – configured as it will be in October, and the orbiter tested receiving signals from below.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 08/11/2016 08:31 AM
Access the full VMC image archive

http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2014/12/17/access-the-full-vmc-image-archive/

ESA Mars Express HRSC images now available under a Creative Commons licence

http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2014/12/18/esa-mars-express-hrsc-images-now-available-under-a-creative-commons-licence/

Mars Webcam goes pro

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Mars_Webcam_goes_pro

VMC The Mars Webcam (Flickr)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/esa_marswebcam/

VMC grows up

http://blogs.esa.int/vmc/2016/08/05/vmc-grows-up/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 12/06/2016 08:02 PM
New evidence for a warmer and wetter early mars

06 December 2016

A recent study from ESA's Mars Express and NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provides new evidence for a warm young Mars that hosted water across a geologically long timescale, rather than in short episodic bursts – something that has important consequences for habitability and the possibility of past life on the planet.

http://sci.esa.int/mars-express/58613-new-evidence-for-a-warmer-and-wetter-early-mars/
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 02/03/2017 10:50 AM

Gorgeous images of the Northern polar cap:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Swirling_spirals_at_the_north_pole_of_Mars
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 12/25/2017 11:43 AM
Still going strong after 14 years:

Quote
#OTD 25 December 2003, Mars Express enters martian orbit, Europe’s successful 1st attempt to send a space probe into orbit around another planet... See esa.int/Our_Activities…
https://twitter.com/esa_history/status/945217476115271680

Quote
And #MarsExpress is staying busy this Christmas, too! Last night #MEX conducted overflight & test communication link w/ @MarsCuriosity #RedPlanet Link was live for 6 mins starting 22:35CET. Recorded signal data was downloaded at 02:33CET this AM
https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/945251285284130816 (https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/945251285284130816)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: redliox on 12/26/2017 02:57 AM
Between the age of the spacecraft and the success Venus Express had at Venus, I wonder if aerobraking would ever be attempted with Mars Express.  I assume, with TGO in orbit now, it's unnecessary since that orbiter is optimized to handle aerobraking.  How much longer can 'Express last as is in light of it's arrival anniversary?
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 01/18/2018 08:12 PM
Crater Neukum named after Mars Express founder

18 January 2018

A fascinating martian crater has been chosen to honour the German physicist and planetary scientist, Gerhard Neukum, one of the founders of ESA’s Mars Express mission.

The International Astronomical Union named the 102 km-wide crater in the Noachis Terra region “Neukum” in September last year after the camera’s leader, who died in 2014. Professor Neukum inspired and led the development of the high-resolution stereo camera on Mars Express, which helped to establish the regional geology and topography of Mars.

Observations by the camera in December 2005 and May 2007 were used to create the image mosaic of Neukum Crater presented here.

Neukum Crater sits in the Noachis Terra region in the densely cratered southern highlands of Mars, some 800 km to the west of the planet’s largest impact basin, Hellas. Noachis Terra is one of the oldest known regions on the Red Planet, dating back at least 3.9 billion years – the earliest martian era, the Noachian epoch, is named after it.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Crater_Neukum_named_after_Mars_Express_founder

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Star One on 04/12/2018 08:06 PM
MARS IMPACT CRATER OR SUPERVOLCANO?

Quote
These images from ESA’s Mars Express show a crater named Ismenia Patera on the Red Planet. Its origin remains uncertain: did a meteorite smash into the surface or could it be the remnants of a supervolcano?

http://m.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Mars_impact_crater_or_supervolcano
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: AlexA on 04/13/2018 03:34 PM
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Mars_Express_v2.0 (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Mars_Express_v2.0)
Quote
Mars Express v2.0

11 April 2018
Every so often, your smartphone or tablet receives new software to improve its functionality and extend its life. Now, ESA’s Mars Express is getting a fresh install, delivered across over 150 million km of space.

With nearly 15 years in orbit, Mars Express – one of the most successful interplanetary missions ever – is on track to keep gathering critical science data for many more years thanks to a fresh software installation developed by the mission teams at ESA.
...
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 04/17/2018 02:14 AM
All is well after the update reboot, full functionality expected to be back in a few days. Live replay of events can be found in @ESA_Operations twitter history, from this tweet: https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/985873946401746945 to this one: https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/985952195693559808
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 06/02/2018 09:36 AM
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/From_horizon_to_horizon_Celebrating_15_years_of_Mars_Express

From horizon to horizon: Celebrating 15 years of Mars Express

Quote
The past 15 years of observations from Mars Express have significantly contributed to the newly emerging picture of Mars as a once-habitable planet, with warmer and wetter epochs that may have once acted as oases for ancient martian life. These findings have paved the way for missions dedicated to hunting for signs of life on the planet, such as ESA and Roscosmos’s two-mission ExoMars programme.   

Meanwhile, on board Mars Express, an innovative software patch has recently rejuvenated the spacecraft.

After the successful activation of new software loaded on the spacecraft on 16 April, followed by a series of in-flight tests, Mars Express resumed science operations on 27 April. The new software, developed by ESA, was needed to compensate for the potential old-age run-down of the satellite's six gyroscopes, which measure how much Mars Express rotates about any of its three axes. Since 16 May, the spacecraft has been operating with its gyros mostly switched off. Fine-tuning of the new software will take place over the coming months.

This implementation is a major operational milestone for the mission, as it gives Mars Express an extended lifeline, possibly through the mid-2020s.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: jacqmans on 07/20/2018 08:48 AM
A unique view of Mars Express

In this unique image, one satellite orbiting Mars records the presence of another. The narrow blur against a black backdrop is in fact ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft, taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor. It is the first-ever successful image of any spacecraft orbiting Mars taken by another spacecraft in a Martian orbit.

Mars Express, still in operation, represents ESA’s first visit to another planet in the Solar System. Launched in 2003 with seven instruments, a lander, a network of ground and data processing stations and a launcher, Mars Express marked the beginning of a new era for Europe’s planetary exploration.

The Mars Global Surveyor was developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and launched in 1996. It mapped the entire Martian planet from the ionosphere down through the atmosphere to its red, rocky surface, but it also caught this glimpse of another spacecraft dedicated to revealing the secrets of one of Earth’s nearest neighbours.

From a distance of 250-370 km, the Mars Global Surveyor captured this remarkable shot of Mars Express, but unfortunately ESA’s satellite could not return the favour.

On 2 November 2016 the NASA spacecraft failed to respond to messages and commands. Three days later a faint signal was detected, indicating the spacecraft had gone into safe mode and was awaiting further instruction. Attempts to re-contact the Mars Global Surveyor and resolve the problem failed, and the mission ended officially in January 2007.

Following this loss of contact, the Mars Express team was requested by NASA to perform actions in the hope of visually identifying the American spacecraft. Two attempts were made to find it, but both proved unsuccessful.

Credits: Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) team, NASA/JPL/MSSS
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/22/2018 02:13 PM
MARTIAN ATMOSPHERE BEHAVES AS ONE

18 July 2018

New research using a decade of data from ESA’s Mars Express has found clear signs of the complex martian atmosphere acting as a single, interconnected system, with processes occurring at low and mid levels significantly affecting those seen higher up.

Understanding the martian atmosphere is a key topic in planetary science, from its current status to its past history. Mars’ atmosphere continuously leaks out to space, and is a crucial factor in the planet’s past, present, and future habitability – or lack of it. The planet has lost the majority of its once much denser and wetter atmosphere, causing it to evolve into the dry, arid world we see today.

However, the tenuous atmosphere Mars has retained remains complex, and scientists are working to understand if and how the processes within it are connected over space and time.

A new study based on 10 years of data from the radar instrument on Mars Express now offers clear evidence of a sought-after link between the upper and lower atmospheres of the planet. While best known for probing the interior of Mars via radar sounding, the instrument has also gathered observations of the martian ionosphere since it began operating in 2005.

http://sci.esa.int/mars-express/60510-martian-atmosphere-behaves-as-one/

"Spatial, seasonal and solar cycle variations of the Martian total electron content (TEC): Is the TEC a good tracer for atmospheric cycles?" by Sánchez-Cano et al. is published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, doi: 10.1029/2018JE005626

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2018JE005626

The study is based on data collected by the Mars Express MARSIS instrument, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding.

Image credit:  ESA/Mars Express/MARSIS/B. Sánchez-Cano et al 2018
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express LIQUID water update
Post by: eeergo on 07/25/2018 02:21 PM
If this interpretation holds, this discovery by MARSIS -apart from being huge by itself- will shift exobiology and direct sampling strategies for decades to come, although the ice in the area is 1.5 km thick and the 1-2 m-deep brine is at -68ºC.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/07/24/science.aar7268


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jul/25/huge-underground-lake-discovered-on-mars-say-astronomers


Quote
Huge underground lake raises prospects of life on Mars, say astronomers


Scientists have spotted a 12 mile-wide stretch of water underneath a slab of ice at the Martian south pole
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Eric Hedman on 07/25/2018 02:24 PM
Another article on it:

https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/world/mars-subsurface-water-lake-evidence/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/world/mars-subsurface-water-lake-evidence/index.html)
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express LIQUID water update
Post by: meekGee on 07/25/2018 03:17 PM
If this interpretation holds, this discovery by MARSIS -apart from being huge by itself- will shift exobiology and direct sampling strategies for decades to come, although the ice in the area is 1.5 km thick and the 1-2 m-deep brine is at -68ºC.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/07/24/science.aar7268


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jul/25/huge-underground-lake-discovered-on-mars-say-astronomers

Quote
Huge underground lake raises prospects of life on Mars, say astronomers


Scientists have spotted a 12 mile-wide stretch of water underneath a slab of ice at the Martian south pole

I certainly hope not!   "Shift strategies", for sure.   But "for decades to come" implies we won't have more significant results and more significant ground capabilities for decades...

This reservoir was an expected find.  Wait till we get to the unexpected finds...



Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: redliox on 07/25/2018 04:45 PM
Well this might raise the potential of the Icebreaker or some other probe to the South Pole now.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 07/25/2018 05:03 PM
Mars Express detects water buried under the south pole of Mars

ESA’s Mars Express has used radar signals bounced through underground layers of ice to find evidence of a pond of water buried below the south polar cap.

Twenty-nine dedicated observations were made between 2012 and 2015 in the Planum Australe region at the south pole using the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding instrument, MARSIS. A new mode of operations established in this period enabled a higher quality of data to be retrieved than earlier in the mission.

The 200 km square study area is indicated in the left-hand image and the radar footprints on the surface are indicated in the middle image for multiple orbits. The greyscale background image is a Thermal Emission Imaging System image from NASA’s Mars Odyssey, and highlights the underlying topography: a mostly featureless plain with icy scarps in the lower right (south is up).

The footprints are colour-coded corresponding to the ‘power’ of the radar signal reflected from features below the surface. The large blue area close to the centre corresponds to the main  radar-bright area, detected on many overlapping orbits of the spacecraft.

A subsurface radar profile is shown in the right hand panel for one of the Mars orbits. The bright horizontal feature at the top represents the icy surface of Mars in this region. The south polar layered deposits – layers of ice and dust – are seen to a depth of about 1.5 km. Below is a base layer that in some areas is even much brighter than the surface reflections, highlighted in blue, while in other places is rather diffuse. Analysing the details of the reflected signals from the base layer yields properties that correspond to liquid water.

The brightest reflections are centred around 193°E/81°S in the intersecting orbits, outlining a well-defined, 20 km-wide zone.

- Related ESA's article: Mars Express detects liquid water hidden under planet's south pole (https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Mars_Express_detects_liquid_water_hidden_under_planet_s_south_pole)

https://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2018/07/Mars_Express_detects_water_buried_under_the_south_pole_of_Mars

Image credit Context map: NASA/Viking; THEMIS background: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Arizona State University; MARSIS data: ESA/NASA/JPL/ASI/Univ. Rome; R. Orosei et al 2018
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: TomH on 07/25/2018 05:38 PM
Mars Express detects water buried under the south pole of Mars

 WaPo (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/07/25/a-12-mile-wide-body-of-water-lies-beneath-the-ice-cap-of-mars/?utm_term=.09a15a9be4ae),  CNN (https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/world/mars-subsurface-water-lake-evidence/index.html),  Time (http://time.com/5347063/mars-lake-water-life/),  Newsweek (https://www.newsweek.com/water-mars-huge-lake-detected-below-red-planets-surface-major-milestone-1041265), and US News (https://www.usnews.com/news/news/articles/2018-07-25/water-is-buried-beneath-martian-landscape-study-says) on same topic.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: dsmillman on 07/26/2018 07:47 PM
There is a press conference on this discovery at:

http://www.asitv.it/media/vod/v/4892/video/latest-news-from-marsis-radar

Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/26/2018 11:33 PM
The actual paper is public access http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/07/24/science.aar7268

People have been predicting subsurface water on Mars for over 40 years, and sub-polar water for about30.It is good to discovery at last.
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: bolun on 09/21/2018 06:37 PM
Mars Express view of Cerberus Fossae

This image, taken on 27 January 2018 during orbit 17813 by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA’s Mars Express, shows a portion of the Cerberus Fossae system in Elysium Planitia near the martian equator.

The image was created using data from the nadir channel, the field of view which is aligned perpendicular to the surface of Mars, and the colour channels of the HRSC. The ground resolution is approximately 16 m/pixel and the images are centred at about 159°E/10°N.

Related article: Recent tectonics on Mars (https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Recent_tectonics_on_Mars)

https://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2018/09/Mars_Express_view_of_Cerberus_Fossae

Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: eeergo on 10/25/2018 03:03 PM
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Mars_Express_keeps_an_eye_on_curious_cloud


Quote
Since 13 September, ESA’s Mars Express has been observing the evolution of an elongated cloud formation hovering in the vicinity of the 20 km-high Arsia Mons volcano, close to the planet’s equator. In spite of its location, this atmospheric feature is not linked to volcanic activity but is rather a water ice cloud driven by the influence of the volcano’s leeward slope on the air flow – something that scientists call an orographic or lee cloud – and a regular phenomenon in this region.
[/font][/size]
Title: Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
Post by: SciNews on 10/26/2018 10:53 AM
Elongated cloud on Mars
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PPK_lN7mOE
images were taken by the Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) between 13 September 2018 and 24 October 2018